Archaeology

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  • Did Cave Acoustics Inspire Prehistoric Artists?

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine
    29 Oct 2014 | 2:30 pm
    INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA—The field of acoustic archaeology is growing as scientists consider the importance of sound to prehistoric cultures and their rituals. Steven Waller of Rock Art Acoustics thinks that ancient people were inspired to decorate cave walls and canyons with images of herds of animals because of the thundering echoes the formations produced. He has found that European caves with higher levels of reverberation are more likely to be decorated, and in North America, there is a correlation between places in canyons with echoes and the placement of prehistoric art. “It’s a…
  • 6 Organisms That Can Survive The Fallout From A Nuclear Explosion

    MorgansLists.com
    Morgans Lists
    29 Aug 2014 | 2:13 pm
    An animal's ability to survive the fallout from a nuclear explosion is usually dependent on its ability to withstand radiation, otherwise know as radioresistance. Radioresistant life forms or ionizing-radiation-resistant organisms (IRRO) are a group of organisms that require large doses of radiation, 1000 gray (Gy), to achieve a 90% reduction in their survival rate. To put it in perspective, a human would need anywhere between 4-10 (Gy) to achieve the same result and a dog could withstand even less, about 3.5 (Gy). Gray, with the symbol of (Gy), is a unit of measurement used to describe the…
  • 60 Examples Of Real Medieval Clothing - An Evolution Of Fashion

    MorgansLists.com
    Morgans Lists
    24 Sep 2014 | 1:48 pm
    Linen tunic with embroidered "jewelry" from grave of Queen Bathildis. (d. 680; buried at Chelles Abbey)Leggings from the 8th century A.D.Photograph of Skjoldehamn decorated trouserlegs. (Skjold harbor, Norway, ca 1050-1090)Hose belonging to German Emperor Heinrich III., Speyr Dom, 1056.Caftan of a chieftain, covered with Syrian silk featuring senmurvs Early 9th century Moshchevaya Balka burial ground, North-Western Caucasus, Stavropol Region Silk (samite), squirrel fur.Tunic belonging to Heinrich II, first half of the 11th C. Abegg-Stiftung Foundation, Bern.A tunic of the infante Don García…
  • Ancient Bahrain exhibition opens

    archaeology - Yahoo News Search Results
    29 Oct 2014 | 8:12 am
    The exhibition will run until March 29, 2015 at the Sharjah Archaeology Museum
  • Ancient auditory illusions reflected in prehistoric art?

    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily
    28 Oct 2014 | 8:47 am
    Some of humankind's earliest and most mysterious artistic achievements -- including prehistoric cave paintings, canyon petroglyphs and megalithic structures such as Stonehenge -- may have been inspired by the behaviors of sound waves being misinterpreted as "supernatural."
 
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    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine

  • Did Cave Acoustics Inspire Prehistoric Artists?

    29 Oct 2014 | 2:30 pm
    INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA—The field of acoustic archaeology is growing as scientists consider the importance of sound to prehistoric cultures and their rituals. Steven Waller of Rock Art Acoustics thinks that ancient people were inspired to decorate cave walls and canyons with images of herds of animals because of the thundering echoes the formations produced. He has found that European caves with higher levels of reverberation are more likely to be decorated, and in North America, there is a correlation between places in canyons with echoes and the placement of prehistoric art. “It’s a…
  • Unusual Sacrifices Unearthed in Peru

    29 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA—Peruvian archaeologist Gabriel Prieto and John Verano of Tulane University have expanded the excavation of a site where the sacrificed remains of 42 children and 76 young llamas were found in 2011. “This is unusual, and not what we’ve seen before, especially on the coast of Peru,” Verano told Phys.org. The site is close to the beach, in an area that was dominated by the Chimú state from 1100 to 1470 A.D., when it was conquered by the Inca Empire. “It’s not a place where you’d think to look,” he added. For more on the site and Chimú-era rituals,…
  • Roman Sculptures Discovered in Northern England

    29 Oct 2014 | 1:30 pm
    PAPCASTLE, ENGLAND—A fertility genius thought to represent a local deity has been unearthed in a village in Cumbria. He holds a cornucopia and a patera, which are symbols of fertility. The site has also yielded the carved heads of male and female gods. The male statue wears a Phrygian cap, and may represent the god Mithras, or perhaps the god Attis, the consort of the goddess Cybele. If Attis, then the female head may represent his counterpart. The base of an amphora that contained a few coins, a stag figurine, and a Roman oil lamp have also been uncovered. According to a report in Culture…
  • Aluminum Debris Identified as Amelia Earhart Artifact

    29 Oct 2014 | 1:00 pm
    OXFORD, PENNSYLVANIA—A piece of aluminum recovered from Nikumaroro, an uninhabited atoll in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, has been identified to a high degree of certainty as a patch that had been applied to Amelia Earhart’s Lockheed Electra on a stop during her attempt to circumnavigate the globe. The repair can been seen in a photograph published in the Miami Herald on June 1, 1937. The aluminum debris was discovered on the island in 1991 by researchers from The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR). They compared the patch’s dimensions and features with the…
  • News from James Fort

    28 Oct 2014 | 2:30 pm
    RICHMOND, VIRGINIA—Captain John Smith wrote that the original, three-sided James Fort was expanded and given five sides sometime in 1608, with as many as 50 houses at the site by 1609. The Williamsburg Yorktown Daily reports that archaeologists from Preservation Virginia have found the outline of the expanded fort and ten buildings. They are currently excavating an area located outside the walls of the expanded fort, where they have found a series of postholes and what may have been a pit or a well. Debris from the pit has included a spur made from copper alloy that dates from 1625 to 1650.
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    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Ancient auditory illusions reflected in prehistoric art?

    28 Oct 2014 | 8:47 am
    Some of humankind's earliest and most mysterious artistic achievements -- including prehistoric cave paintings, canyon petroglyphs and megalithic structures such as Stonehenge -- may have been inspired by the behaviors of sound waves being misinterpreted as "supernatural."
  • Genomic data support early contact between Easter Island and Americas

    23 Oct 2014 | 10:16 am
    People may have been making their way from Easter Island to the Americas well before Dutch commander Jakob Roggeveen arrived in 1722, according to new genomic evidence showing that the Rapanui people living on that most isolated of islands had significant contact with Native American populations hundreds of years earlier. The findings lend the first genetic support for such an early trans-Pacific route between Polynesia and the Americas, a trek of more than 4,000 kilometers.
  • Hippos-Sussita excavation: Silent evidence of the earthquake of 363 CE

    23 Oct 2014 | 7:04 am
    Silent evidence of a large earthquake in 363 CE -- the skeleton of a woman with a dove-shaped pendant -- was discovered under the tiles of a collapsed roof by archeologists from the University of Haifa during this excavation season at Hippos-Sussita. They also found a large muscular marble leg and artillery ammunition from some 2,000 years ago. "The data is finally beginning to form a clear historical-archaeological picture," said Dr. Michael Eisenberg, head of the international excavation team.
  • Ancient Europeans intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agriculture

    21 Oct 2014 | 9:59 am
    By analyzing DNA from petrous bones of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified these peoples remained intolerant to lactose (natural sugar in the milk of mammals) for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultural practices. The scientific team examined nuclear ancient DNA extracted from thirteen individuals from burials from archaeological sites in the Great Hungarian Plain. The skeletons sampled date from 5,700 BC (Early Neolithic) to 800 BC (Iron Age).
  • Roman Gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank a tonic of ashes after training

    20 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    Roman gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank ashes after training as a tonic. These are the findings of anthropological investigations carried out on bones of warriors found during excavations in the ancient city of Ephesos.
 
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    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek

  • TOC & CFP, J. African Diaspora Archaeology & Heritage

    Christopher Fennell
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:41 am
    Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and HeritageVolume 3, No. 2, November 2014   This issue is now available online at:http://www.maneyonline.com/toc/jaf/3/2?ai=yo&ui=1yc&af=T ; Table of Contents Weaving the Second Skin: Protection Against Evil Among the Valongo Slaves in Nineteenth-century Rio de JaneiroBy Tania Andrade Lima Marcos André Torres de Souza Glaucia Malerba SeneJ. of African Diaspora Archaeology & Heritage, Vol. 3, No. 2: 103-136.http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/2161944114Z.00000000015?ai=yo&ui=1yc&af=T ; Toys with Professions: Racialized…
  • 2015 Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Field School, Great Blasket Island, Ireland

    Christopher Fennell
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:38 am
    2015 Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Field School, Great Blasket Island, IrelandUniversity of Illinois, Urbana-ChampaignMay 25 to July 3, 20156 weeks, 6 creditsThis field school in archaeology, history, heritage, and landscape studies will examine the lifeways of residents of Great Blasket Island (Blascaod Mor) off the southwest coast of the Dingle Peninsula (Corca Dhuibhne) of the Republic of Ireland. Great Blasket and its surrounding islands have been traversed by cultures leaving traces from fort sites thousands of years in age, to monastic dwellings and Viking incursions in the medieval…
  • Entry deadline extended to Nov. 15 for TAC Festival 2015 film entries

    Rick Pettigrew
    28 Oct 2014 | 2:17 pm
    To our film producer and distributor friends:  Due to multiple requests, we have extended the deadline for the last time for submitting entries for the 2015 edition of The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival.  This is the only international competition for this genre in the entire Western Hemisphere and a wonderful showcase for your work.  Our NEW deadline for receipt of entries is November 15, 2014.  TAC Festival 2015 takes place May 15-19, 2015, in the Recital Hall at The Shedd Institute and at the University of Oregon Baker Downtown Center here in Eugene, Oregon,…
  • Introducing Strata: Portraits of Humanity, online and on TV

    Rick Pettigrew
    15 Oct 2014 | 11:32 am
    Friends and colleagues: We are very excited today to launch Strata: Portraits of Humanity online and on TV! Please share this news with everyone who will listen. Unlike any other show available anywhere, Strata is a fresh monthly showcase for unique, captivating and diverse stories about our cultural heritage from an archaeological perspective. Besides that, it’s just plain fun to watch! We produce some of the segments ourselves and acquire the rest from our dozens of producer and distributor partners around the world. Our stories come from across the globe, ranging from North America to…
  • Strata: Portraits of Humanity premieres on Oct. 15th!

    Rick Pettigrew
    2 Oct 2014 | 10:12 am
    Strata: Portraits of Humanity is The Archaeology Channel's all new monthly show featuring handpicked stories from the world of cultural heritage! The show will be available on the TAC website archaeologychannel.org, 26 local cable stations across the country, and on Comcast OnDemand in western Oregon and western Washington. Watch the preview below and tune in on Oct. 15th for the full episode!
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    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog

  • New exhibition in Singapore will feature archaeology

    noelbynature
    29 Oct 2014 | 6:35 am
    A new exhibition at the National Museum of Singapore highlights 700 years of Singapore history, including displays on Singapore archaeology and pre-colonial Singapore. New exhibition to explore 700 years of Singapore’s history Channel NewsAsia, 27 October 2014 The National Museum of Singapore is launching SINGAPURA: 700 Years, an interactive exhibition that explores seven centuries of the Republic’s history, on Tuesday (Oct 28), it announced in a press release on Monday (Oct 27). With the closure of the Singapore History Gallery on Nov 3, SINGAPORE: 700 Years will be one of the…
  • Thai archaeologists inspect repatriated Ban Chiang artefacts

    noelbynature
    27 Oct 2014 | 12:44 am
    Ban Chiang artefacts returned by the Bowers Museum in US earlier this year are now being inspected by the archaeologists of the the Fine Arts Department. Source: Bangkok Post 20141026 Ancient artefacts back where they belong Bangkok Post, 26 October 2014 A group of the country’s top archaeologists recently went about the painstaking task of examining more than 500 ancient antiquities returned to Thailand. Some of the pottery was placed on shelves, while small ornamental items were wrapped in transparent plastic with handwritten codes to identify the sources of the items. Amara…
  • Job Opportunity: Faculty Position in Southeast Asian History, NYU Abu Dhabi

    noelbynature
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:28 am
    NYU Abu Dhabi has a Faculty Position open for Southeast Asian History, with a targeted appointment for September 2015. NYU Abu Dhabi is currently inviting applications for a tenured or tenure-track appointment at any level (assistant, associate, or full professor) for its History Program. Applicants should offer a special area of research and teaching dealing with any historical period concerning Southeast Asia. We are seeking historians with an active research and publishing agenda, and a demonstrated commitment to undergraduate teaching. Please visit the History Program’s website for more…
  • Cham people observe annual Kate festival

    noelbynature
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:19 am
    The Cham people observe the annual Kate Festival in commemoration of their gods and ancestors. Cham Towers in Ninh Thuan Province. Source: Viet Nam News 20141024 Cham people hold annual festival Viet Nam News, 24 October 2014 Thousands of ethnic Cham and tourists travelled to the Po Inu Nagar Temple, Po Klong Garai Tower and Po Rome Tower in the central province of Ninh Thuan to celebrate the traditional Kate festival that kicked off yesterday. The festival, the largest on the Cham calendar, pays respect to the gods and makes offerings to ancestors, along with wishes for favorable weather,…
  • Vandalised statue returns to Bayon

    noelbynature
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:09 am
    The statue that was destroyed by a recalcitrant tourist earlier this month is re-installed in the Bayon with a Buddhist ceremony. Statue Smashed by Tourist Returned to Bayon Temple Cambodia Daily, 24 October 2014 The Apsara Authority on Thursday returned a statue of the Buddha to its place in Bayon temple at the Angkor Archaeological Park after a tourist smashed it earlier this month. The woman, Willemijn Vermaat, a Dutch national living in New Zealand, told local media in New Zealand that a voice in her head told her to break the statue because it was in a temple dedicated to the wrong…
 
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    Publishing Archaeology

  • Open Access Week

    Michael E. Smith
    19 Oct 2014 | 1:13 pm
    This coming week is "Open Access Week". Check out the central website, called Open access week. The promise and importance of open access was one of the main reasons I started this blog in 2007. Over the years I think I have grown cynical about the lack of progress in open access on most fronts, but I remain committed to the concept. I was asked by librarian Anali Perry to respond to several questions about open access; my responses (and several others) will be posted on the library website this week. Here are my replies: What is your experience with open access publishing?I write about…
  • How to make a weak argument

    Michael E. Smith
    12 Oct 2014 | 3:59 pm
    Suppose you are writing up some archaeological results. You will be making a bunch of arguments--statements that draw on data and theory to come to some conclusion of interest. Most works contain a number of arguments, often at different levels. For example you make claim that you found 41 pieces of obsidian in the lowest level and only 14 in the uppermost level. This is an argument, but it is not a particularly interesting one. You may later make a more interesting argument suggesting that the decline in obsidian was due to changing commercial routes that now avoided your site, or perhaps…
  • How would you know if you are wrong?

    Michael E. Smith
    7 Oct 2014 | 9:31 pm
    I haven't been posting lately. I've been busy running a bunch of research projects, and I'm teaching a new grad seminar on theory in archaeology. We've finished with the epistemology part of the class (what is theory? how to you construct a good argument? what is an explanation? how should you use analogy?), and have started on the theory part. We are focusing on theory that can be applied archaeologically, and on how one goes about applying theory.One benefit of the epistemology part of the class is that it has helped me organize my thoughts, and given me a better understanding of just what…
  • Breakthrough discovery!

    Michael E. Smith
    5 Aug 2014 | 11:31 am
    Scientists have discovered the earliest retraction of a scientific work, back in the Upper Paleolithic. Check this out at Retraction Watch.
  • Authorship: Who gets credit?

    Michael E. Smith
    3 Aug 2014 | 6:17 pm
    "Piled Higher and Deeper" by Jorge Cham www.phdcomics.com  Several things have gotten me thinking about issues of authorship. I've been publishing quite a bit with student co-authors lately, so this is an active topic with me and my students. In fact, authorship is most commonly a topic of concern when students are involved. Should students get authorship credit on published articles? How is this determined? Many professional societies have explicit principles and guidelines about this. The Society for American Archaeology evidently does not have any guidelines. The American…
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    Middle Savagery

  • Who Digs? Craft & Non-specialist labor in archaeology

    colleenmorgan
    9 Oct 2014 | 11:24 am
    Dan and I wrote a short polemic for Bill Caraher’s series on Craft and Archaeology. It was a hydra of a piece to write–we wanted to be succinct and direct, but it kept spiraling out of control. We obviously have a lot more to say on the subject, here’s a short excerpt: Digging is the most evocative archaeological practice, yet it is the most undervalued mode of archaeological knowledge production, least cultivated skill with fewest monetary rewards, and is considered so inconsequential that non-specialist labor is regularly employed to uncover our most critical data sets.
  • Book Review: Archaeographies

    colleenmorgan
    8 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Real Estate Open House, by Fotis Ifantidis My review of Fotis Ifantidis’ Archaeographies came out in the Journal of Contemporary Archaeology. I’m not sure why there aren’t figures, but oh well. A quote from the review: Out of the thousands of photographs taken at Dispilio, Ifantidis has selected examples that are, on the surface, aggressively non-archaeological. These photographs do not effectively document the archaeological record in a way that is acceptable as standard site photography: scales, when deployed, are haphazard, artifacts are scattered and in partial focus,…
  • 50 Years of Visualization at Çatalhöyük

    colleenmorgan
    7 Oct 2014 | 9:14 am
    As I previously mentioned, Jason Quinlan and I co-presented a poster at this year’s EAA in Istanbul. While it isn’t quite as brilliant as Alison Akins’ Plague Poster, I enjoyed putting something together about the photography at Çatalhöyük, especially with one of the primary photographers involved! Regardless, I’ve put our poster below. Of particular note is the immense increase in the size of the archive after Photoscan was introduced at Çatalhöyük. Jason and I collaborated on this remotely, and so there is some funny bits with converting between iterations of…
  • Punks, Hard Drives & Minecraft Archaeology

    colleenmorgan
    30 Sep 2014 | 6:31 am
    The inimitable Sara Perry and I have been working on the archaeological excavation of a hard drive, for science! We’ve been writing about it on Savage Minds, the Other blog about Savages. Here are the blog posts in order: What Archaeologists Do What Archaeologists Do: Between Archaeology and Media Archaeology What Archaeologists Do: Research Design and the Media Archaeology Drive Project (MAD-P) What Archaeologists Do: The Site Report & What it Means to Excavate a Hard Drive I’m also very excited that the Punk Archaeology volume has landed, be sure to download…
  • Notes on Getting Your Whole Life Stolen

    colleenmorgan
    17 Sep 2014 | 8:23 am
    “It’s Not the Same” by Jonathan on Flickr At the European Association for Archaeologists this year, our rented flat was broken into and a lot…a LOT of stuff was stolen, from me and the other archaeologists we were staying with. We’re still sorting everything out with the police, Airbnb, and insurance, but I thought I’d document a few things that I’ve learned. I had Prey and Find My Iphone installed on my Macbook pro, ipad and iphone. While I will install them again on my new equipment, they are not much good against savvy thieves. We actually were…
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    Looting Matters

  • The Intellectual Consequences of Collecting Archaeological Material

    David Gill
    27 Oct 2014 | 1:30 am
    Context helps to explain archaeological material. There is information about the specific location, the stratigraphic relationship with other objects, and the association with related material. It is easy for archaeologists to document the looting of archaeological sites. And the Medici Dossier, the Becchina Archive, and the Schinoussa Images have made it possible to identify objects that have entered the market.But we also need to consider the limitations of discussing such 'unexcavated' objects. Chris Chippindale and I explored some of the issues relating to Cycladic figures, and I…
  • The Curator, the Fax and the Mummy Mask

    David Gill
    24 Oct 2014 | 2:07 pm
    I remain puzzled by the St Louis Art Museum. It seems that less than one year after acquiring the Ka-Nefer-Nefer mummy mask (the one with the name erased from the hand), a distinguished Egyptologist from a major international museum faxed a member of the curatorial team at SLAM drawing attention to the link with Saqqara.It also seems that another museum-based Egyptologist encouraged the leadership team at SLAM to contact the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA), in part because it was known that the archaeological store at Saqqara had been 'disturbed'.The leadership team at SLAM will…
  • James Cuno Revives "Culture Wars"

    David Gill
    23 Oct 2014 | 1:58 pm
    I have been unimpressed by James Cuno's attempts to be a commentator on the looting of archaeological sites. I have reviewed his works elsewhere:Who Owns Antiquity? (2008) [academia.edu]Who Owns Culture? (2009) [academia.edu]Museums Matter (2011) [academia.edu]Now Cuno has decided to reopen the discussion with an essay, "Culture Wars: The Case Against Repatriating Museum Artifacts
", Foreign Affairs November / December 2014.Cuno overlooks some issues that are very relevant to the debate about repatriation. What about the Egyptian material from the Tomb of Tetatki that had been acquired by…
  • US Government Pays $425,000 for Legal Case

    David Gill
    22 Oct 2014 | 3:07 pm
    It now appears that the US Government has had to pay $425,000 in legal fees and costs to the St Louis Art Museum (Jenna Greence, "Feds Lose Fight Over Ancient Mummy Mask", National Law Journal October 21, 2014).The mask was purchased for $499,000 in 1998.Pat McInerney of Dentons and Husch Blackwell was quoted:"The Mask of Ka-Nefer-Nefer was a fascinating case that ultimately showed the extent to which the government unfortunately overreached in an attempt to literally take an artifact from the Saint Louis Art Museum using a lawsuit the court said was ‘completely devoid of any facts’…
  • Ka-Nefer-Nefer Mummy Mask: the unanswered questions

    David Gill
    22 Oct 2014 | 7:55 am
    Paul Barford has drawn attention to the response by SLAM's legal team to the conclusion of the two parallel legal cases.Patrick McInerney will need to explain when his client was first informed that the Ka-Nefer-Nefer mask was derived from Saqqara. How did curators at SLAM respond? Then there is the issue of when (or if) SLAM contacted the Egyptian SCA about the mask. And was the Director of SLAM ever advised to contact Zahi Hawass about the acquisition and the Saqqara link? Did the curator responsible for the acquisition provide misleading or inaccurate information to the Cairo Museum? How…
 
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    Theoretical Structural Archaeology

  • Posthole Archaeology; Function, Form and Fighting

    Geoff Carter
    26 Oct 2014 | 1:19 pm
    In the previous post I posed the question what buildings does a moderately complex hierarchical agricultural society require, looking at aspects of agricultural buildings; this time I am looking at moderately complex hierarchical society, or at least that end of hierarchy that tends to represented in archaeology.It is fashionable, and perhaps progressive, to talk of higher status individuals or elites, to avoid cultural bias inherent such terms as aristocracy.   However, I use the term in its original cultural context precisely to reference that bias, or understanding, and…
  • Posthole archaeology; function, form and farming

    Geoff Carter
    25 Sep 2014 | 6:18 pm
    By the Bronze Age in British Isles, and certainly in terms of the proto-historic Late Iron Age, we have what historians might call petty kings and aristocracy, sometimes with a more wider regional and national institutions.  Although our museums have their weapons and treasures, architecturally, we have lost sight of the petty king in his palace and the homes of the aristocracy, always such a feature of our countryside.  But this is just the tip of an iceberg of ignorance, since we know very little of the charcoal burner in his hut, and have no real notion of cart sheds or byres;…
  • Dumbing down the past.

    Geoff Carter
    12 Sep 2014 | 5:14 pm
    Dumbing down through abstraction.In two previous posts, [ 1 + 2 ] I have demonstrated that one of the central images of British Prehistory, the Wessex Roundhouse, is a construct which does not accurately represent the evidence.  It is not a discovery, or rocket science, I just read the relevant reports and looked at the plans and sections. While I am happy to call these roundhouse constructs dumbing down, what to call the scholarship they generate presents a problem, since it represents the application of presumably perfectly acceptable theory to an imaginary data set. Archaeology…
  • Parish Notices; Help Nigel Hetherington of Past Preservers do the EH Wall Hike

    Geoff Carter
    4 Sep 2014 | 11:52 am
    On  19 of September Nigel Hetherington of Past Preservers, will be returning to his ancestral homelands and taking part in the English Heritage's Hadrian's Wall Hike to raise funds for much needed conservation along the famous route. Please Donate today to support Nigel and English Heritage, and share with your friends and colleagues. All of your donations and efforts are greatly appreciated, please Tweet your support to @Pastpreservers and @EnglishHeritage using the #HadriansHike hashtag and please spread the word! Things are not…
  • Roundhouse Psychosis

    Geoff Carter
    30 Aug 2014 | 5:31 pm
    In the previous post I explained why the large Wessex style “roundhouse” as illustrated and rebuilt is a fiction which is not supported by the evidence.  To be fair to all concerned, it never was a “peer reviewed” idea, but like the artists reconstruction that decorate the front of some archaeological texts, it has a far greater impact on our collective perception of the past than any sterile rendition of the evidence.  The problem is that Roundhouses are more than just infotainment, a bit of harmless hokum for Joe Public, they are taken seriously, not only by those who…
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    Stone Pages Archaeo News

  • Massive prehistoric settlement unearthed in Ukraine

    23 Oct 2014 | 3:47 am
    A temple dating back about 6,000 years has been discovered within a massive prehistoric settlement in Ukraine. The temple is about 60 by 20 meters (197 by 66 feet) in...
  • Neolithic barbeque pit found in Cyprus

    23 Oct 2014 | 3:47 am
    Archaeologists have uncovered what could be a prehistoric barbeque pit used by large bands of hunters at the Prastio-Mesorotsos site in Cyprus. According to the antiquities department, the team of...
  • 5000-year-old cave paintings discovered in Russia

    23 Oct 2014 | 3:46 am
    Russian archaeologists have discovered ancient cave paintings dating back to 3000 BC in a gorge in southern Russia. "A few days ago we found five drawings, fairly large fragments, on...
  • New settlement found in Arizona desert

    20 Oct 2014 | 1:53 am
    In the northeast corner of Arizona (USA) is an area known as the Arizona Petrified Forest National Park. The forest in question is actually over 200 million years old and...
  • Tracing our ancestors at the bottom of the sea

    20 Oct 2014 | 1:52 am
    A specialist group of European researchers are studying the remains of prehistoric human settlements which are now submerged beneath our coastal seas. Some of these drowned sites are tens of...
 
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    Archaeology News from Past Horizons

  • Medieval oak timbers and hexagonal harbour discovered on west coast of Scotland

    Past Horizons
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:05 am
    A group of large Scottish oak timbers probably from a substantial, dismantled timber tower has been discovered buried in the coastal sand flats at Hunterston Sands, North Ayrshire. Initial tree ring (dendrochronological) dating suggests at least one of the timbers is around 800 years old, making this a very unusual find.
  • Offerings found in Temple of the Feathered Serpent tunnel at Teotihuacan

    Past Horizons
    30 Oct 2014 | 2:30 am
    At a recent press conference on the Tlalocan project, it was announced that a substantial offering and three chambers have been discovered at the far end of a tunnel discovered under the Temple of the Feathered Serpent in Teotihuacan, Mexico.
  • Small clue to Neolithic Cham flint traders

    Alexander Binsteiner
    29 Oct 2014 | 11:38 pm
    Weighing in at a few grammes, and measuring only 25mm long, a tiny scraper discovered by an amateur archaeologist on the Schlögen loop of the River Danube, Upper Austria, tells a story of trade and society in Central Europe over 5,000 years ago, and helps piece together a long forgotten way of life.Author informationAlexander BinsteinerDipl.Geol.Univ. Alexander Binsteiner examined in his thesis the chert deposit of Baierdorf at Ried castle in Altmühltal. After that, he was a field director of excavations at the flint mine of Arnhofen near Abensberg. From 1993-96 he was chief geologist of…
  • Talking statues in London and Manchester

    Past Horizons
    28 Oct 2014 | 7:25 am
    The University of Leicester is a partner in an innovative project that has seen statues ‘come alive’ and ‘speak’ to passers-by.
  • Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade [in 60 seconds]

    Past Horizons
    28 Oct 2014 | 2:39 am
    [http://1a4studio.com/] What a treat, as the folk at 1a4 Studios present the entire Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade film in just 60 seconds. Not to be missed.
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    The Archaeology News Network

  • Ancient auditory illusions reflected in prehistoric art?

    28 Oct 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Some of humankind's earliest and most mysterious artistic achievements -- including prehistoric cave paintings, canyon petroglyphs and megalithic structures such as Stonehenge -- may have been inspired by the behaviors of sound waves being misinterpreted as "supernatural." Prehistoric paintings of hoofed animals in a cave with thunderous reverberations located in Bhimbetka, India [Credit: S. Waller]During the 168th Meeting of the... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Amphipolis dig shows no doorway to fourth chamber

    28 Oct 2014 | 11:00 am
    Indications that a huge tomb being excavated in Ancient Amphipolis, northern Greece, could have a doorway leading to a fourth chamber have not been confirmed by the dig, the Culture Ministry’s general secretary Lina Mendoni said on Tuesday. Restored view of the tomb's entrance by the excavation's architect M. Levantzi   [Credit: Greek Ministry of Culture]Archaeologists working in the tomb’s third chamber thought a gap in the... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Wreck of HMS Victory may soon reveal its secrets

    28 Oct 2014 | 10:30 am
    In April 2008, as part of its ongoing “Atlas” shipwreck survey project in the western English Channel, Odyssey Marine Exploration recorded an interesting target using side-scan sonar and a magnetometer. The resultant high-frequency image depicted a clearly disturbed sea bottom across an oval area of 40m, interspersed with linear objects. The 35-gamma magnetometer profile was suggestive of a wooden wreck with features typifying iron... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Raw clay pots from Pompeii workshop found

    28 Oct 2014 | 10:00 am
    Archaeologists say they have found the remains of dozens of pieces of pottery in their raw clay form in what was once a ceramics workshop near ancient Pompeii's Herculaneum gate. The vessels, sealed under ash from the fiery eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, have been catalogued for study by scholars interested in the daily life of Pompeii, including numerous artisanal workshops. The office of Italy's superintendent of archaeology... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Vietnam salvager says ancient coins looted from shipwreck

    28 Oct 2014 | 9:30 am
    Around two tons of ancient coins have disappeared from a sunken boat yet to be salvaged off Quang Ngai Province on Vietnam's central coast and locals held the blame of stealing them. Ancient pottery recovered from a shipwreck off Quang Ngai Province  [Credit: Thanh Long/Vietnam News Agency]Nguyen Dang Vu, director of the province’s culture department, said many people have taken advantage of the rough weather that delayed... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    The Mathisen Corollary

  • Find the Beehive Cluster in the pre-dawn sky!

    David Warner Mathisen
    29 Oct 2014 | 12:26 am
    The constellations and celestial bodies visible before sunrise are truly spectacular at this time of year, and well worth rising early and heading directly outside to marvel at them, if at all possible.The brilliant figure of Orion has been rising a bit earlier each morning (see this long-ago post which discusses this earlier-rising motion) and thus making his way just a bit further towards the west when viewed at the same time from one morning to the next. Because of this fact, he is now past the meridian line (or past "culmination") and further towards the west than the east by about 5:30…
  • Get ready for Halloween! (And for All-Hallow's Day, with the teachings of Alvin Boyd Kuhn)

    David Warner Mathisen
    28 Oct 2014 | 12:29 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).Halloween approaches in just a few days, but there is still time to get ready . . . by reading the enlightening meditation by Alvin Boyd Kuhn entitled Hallowe'en: A Festival of Lost Meanings.The entire booklet is only 33 pages long (in its electronic format's electronic pagination -- 64 pages long in the original pagination, of which the "pages" are very short, only a paragraph or two each, with two or three of them appearing on every "page" of the electronic layout), and it is available for your enjoyment on the web here (click on the word "fullscreen" under…
  • Happy Birthday to Bootsy Collins!

    David Warner Mathisen
    26 Oct 2014 | 10:16 am
    Happy Birthday today to Bootsy Collins: singer, bassist, songwriter, and space traveler! (October 26)You can hear his distinctive and pioneering bass on any Parliament song and almost any Funkadelic song, and he continues creating, receiving, and bringing out new music from the celestial spheres, such as Tha Funk Capitol of the World album, which can be played in its entirety at his official website. The entire mythology of the Funk revolves around the message that all men and women are somehow descended from the stars, which also happens to be true (mythology being one of the most…
  • Star Myths in the Arabian Nights!

    David Warner Mathisen
    25 Oct 2014 | 11:31 pm
    imagery: Stellarium.orgSPOILER ALERT: This blog post will reveal my interpretations of the celestial foundations underlying two episodes from the incredible Thousand Nights and a Night (otherwise known as the 1,001 Nights, or the Arabian Nights). These two episodes were introduced in the previous post entitled "The Arabian Nights: can you unlock their celestial metaphors?" If you want to go back and try to unlock them for yourself before you read the following explanation, just click the link before reading any further, and come back after you're done!Here we go . . .In the first…
  • The Arabian Nights: can you unlock their celestial metaphors?

    David Warner Mathisen
    24 Oct 2014 | 2:30 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).Richard Francis Burton (1821 - 1890) "was one of those Victorians whose energy and achievements make any modern man quail," in the words of the novelist A. S. Byatt in the introduction to Burton's translation of the Thousand Nights and a Night, also commonly known as the Thousand and One Nights, or the Arabian Nights (xv). A partial list of examples ensues, of course:He lived like one of his own heroes, travelling in Goa, Equatorial Africa, brazil, India, and the Middle East. He took part in the Crimean war. He went with J. H. Speke to find the source…
 
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    Doug's Archaeology

  • With Archaeology and Science Under Assault How Many Allies Do We Have? – Number of People with Archaeology Degrees

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    27 Oct 2014 | 12:00 am
    A few months ago I posted an estimation of the number of people with Archaeology degrees from US Universities. I have since done quite a bit more research on the subject. My initial estimates are probably too high for undergraduate degrees. But, I also found some associated degrees i.e. CRM, and pushed the data back to 1894- the year the first Archaeology PhD was given out (Add that question to the Antiquity quiz at this year’s TAG conference).  I have compiled it all together into a piece for the SAA Archaeological Record (SAAAR) and submitted it last week. I am posting in here for…
  • Around the Archaeology Blog-o-sphere Digest #8

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    26 Oct 2014 | 5:39 am
    Here is my weekly list of blog posts from Archaeology blogs/ blogs that focus on Archaeology. Purpose I am highlighting some of the other archeo-blogs out there by collecting all their posts from the previous week . Hopefully, you find some of the posts interesting and/or find a new blog to follow. Source I took these posts from my now updated list of archaeology blogs (415+ and counting). There are a few blogs that should be in this list that are missing — hoping to fix that. Here are this weeks posts– Edited- Robert Asked for some of his posts to be included so adding them to the list-…
  • In Open Access Publishing There Are No Free Lunches….. but it is really really cheap.

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    23 Oct 2014 | 3:59 pm
    In my last post, I mentioned that not all Open Access publishing involves authors paying $2,000. In fact, many journals neither charge the authors or readers and if they do some will waive fees. This led to this very thoughtful comment from Anders- “Excellent that there are OA publishers that do not charge the authors an APC, and that the review process is independent of payment. However, that does raise another question. If the journal offer the same service as we (at least I) have been used to, that is things like professional peer review, archiving, indexing, PR (see also the blog…
  • Open Access Does NOT equal You, the Author, Paying

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    20 Oct 2014 | 3:16 pm
    Open Access hurts young scholars, people from poor countries, people not working in Universities, and those in poor disciplines, like Archaeology, etc. etc. etc. because they can’t afford paying $2,000, $3,000, $10,000 to get published in OA publications. I have my suspicions about how this rumor got started. Critics of Open Access, like Jeffrey Beall, mention some of these issues in tirades* against Open Access. But, probably 99% of people who publish in scholarly journals do not actually follow the debate about scholarly publishing. I highly suspect that most of you feel this way…
  • Around the Archaeology Blog-o-sphere Digest #7

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:05 am
    Here is my weekly list of blog posts from Archaeology blogs/ blogs that focus on Archaeology. I have added a couple of more blogs to the list so some more new reading. Purpose I am highlighting some of the other archeo-blogs out there by collecting all their posts from the previous week . Hopefully, you find some of the posts interesting and/or find a new blog to follow. Source I took these posts from my now updated list of archaeology blogs (415+ and counting). There are a few blogs that should be in this list that are missing — hoping to fix that. Here are this weeks posts–…
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    Cultural Heritage Lawyer Rick St. Hilaire

  • Terrorism and Financial Intelligence Undersecretary Points to Antiquities Trafficking as a Source of ISIS Funding

    23 Oct 2014 | 7:22 pm
    David CohenSource: U.S. TreasuryThe Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) earns most of its cash from oil revenues, approximately $1 million per day. But the terror group also profits from crimes that include heritage trafficking."They lay waste to thousands of years of civilization in Iraq and Syria by looting and selling antiquities," David Cohen said today.As the federal government's point-man in charge of uncovering and blocking financial support for terrorist groups, Under Secretary Cohen's insight on the topic should be given considerable weight. Since 2011, Attorney Cohen has served…
  • Conflict and the Heritage Trade: Rise in U.S. Imports of Middle East "Antiques" and "Collectors' Pieces" Raises Questions

    6 Oct 2014 | 4:30 am
    American imports of art, collections and collectors' pieces, and antiques from Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria, and Turkey increased sharply between 2011 and 2013, prompting questions about whether trafficked heritage has piggybacked onto the mainstream marketplace.War, mass looting, and other grave threats to heritage greatly expand the risk that smuggled cultural contraband will slide into the stream of international commerce undetected. Because art and antiquities transactions often lack transparency or fail to exercise rigorous due diligence, examining…
  • Stipulation Puts a Lid on Litigation Over Roman Sarcophagus Cover Featured in the Becchina Archive

    22 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    The Roman sarcophagus lid. ICEA marble Roman sarcophagus lid is expected to be forfeited and returned to Italy after federal prosecutors and the potential claimant signed a stipulation last week.Litigation over the sculptured coffin cover--the so-called Defendant in rem--was avoided when the parties finalized their September 14 agreement over the stolen cultural object, which features in the Becchina archiveThe stipulation filed in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York recites in part:WHEREAS, Mr. [Noriyoshi] Horiuchi [of Tokyo,…
  • Register Now for the Sixth Annual Cultural Heritage Law Moot Court Competition

    21 Sep 2014 | 6:51 am
    The Lawyers’ Committee for Cultural Heritage Preservation and DePaul College of Law have opened registration for the Sixth Annual Cultural Heritage Law Moot Court Competition.Chicago-Kent College of Law won the fifth annual event that focused on trafficked heritage. Who will win next?The 2015 competition will argue constitutional challenges to the Visual Artists Rights Act of 1990 (VARA), 17 U.S.C. § 106A, which protects visual artists’ moral rights of attribution and integrity.Oral Arguments are scheduled for February 27 and 28, 2015 at the United States Court of…
  • Conservator's Records To Be Subpoenaed As Prosecutors Score Triple Victory in Peruvian Artifacts Forfeiture Cases

    16 Sep 2014 | 3:30 am
    Federal prosecutors recently scored three court victories in two forfeiture actions and one subpoena case involving allegedly contraband Peruvian artifacts.A federal magistrate in New Mexico recommended that a conservator, who may have handled contraband objects, turn over his business records to prosecutors under subpoena, a decision that certainly will attract attention among conservation professionals since they are rarely the subject of cultural property claims filed by the government.A federal judge in Miami, meanwhile, ruled that the two cases seeking to forfeit the Peruvian objects…
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    The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty

  • Episode 19 “Caen you handle this? It’s France, part Deux!”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    2 Oct 2014 | 11:50 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back to The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty! This is episode 19 of the podcast “Caen you handle this? It’s France, part Deux!” In this, the second installment of Jenny’s French adventures, we talk about my time in Paris and the Normandy region. Some of the things I waxed on about in this episode include: What’s up with city planning and historical relevance in Paris? Saint Denis Paris? Really? His name is Denis… Jenny’s movie recommendation for the month: Midnight in Paris Guess the obscure musical…
  • Béarnaise Awesome-Sauce

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:17 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Bonjour mes amis! Et bienvenue to episode 18 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty, “Béarnaise Awesome-Sauce!” You may have noticed that I’ve been gone for the last three weeks (yeah, sorry about that), well it’s because I’ve been in France! So I thought now that I’ve returned to my native soil I would tell you all about my travels and the fun and fascinating things I learned while exploring the beautiful land of baguettes, burgundy, and béarnaise sauce! This will be a two-part series because there’s…
  • Episode 17 “Great Odin’s Raven- it’s Archaeology 101!

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    5 Jul 2014 | 5:48 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Hi friends, welcome to Episode 17 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty Podcast “Great Odin’s Raven-it’s Archaeology 101!” In this fun filled episode we tackle some of the basics of excavation, with a focus on why archaeology and geology are old friends- and how this makes us better at what we do. It’s like taking that Archaeology 101 class you never got around to in college! (Unless you actually did take that class, then it’s more of a review of things you probably already know…sorry). In this new…
  • Episode 16 “Go West, Young (Wo)Man!”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    13 Jun 2014 | 2:26 am
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back friends! It’s another fantabulous episode of basically the best podcast that ever lived, “The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty!” So perhaps you noticed that I disappeared from the interwebs all of last week, that’s because I was working outside the reach of modern technology (and air conditioning). I had a fun week camping and surveying in the Zuni Mountains of New Mexico, which sounded like a pretty good topic for this week’s episode. We discuss the history of pioneering logging efforts in this area, as…
  • SAA Time 2014!

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    7 May 2014 | 6:32 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Tweet Hello friends! It's time for episode 15 of The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty "SAA Time 2014!" That's right, this is my reaction podcast to the Society for American Archaeology Conference in Austin, Texas. Pretty exciting stuff right?! Well, it's informative and entertaining at least (I hope!). This is a shorter episode because I have stuck only to topics falling under the banner of conferences, career advice, my fabu 4 days in Austin, and summer plans. I would definitely listen if you are a young archaeologist interested in figuring out the…
 
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    AntiquityNOW

  • The Colorful Past of Halloween Treats

    AntiquityNOW
    30 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Lads, look at yourselves. Why are you, boy, wearing that Skull face? And you, boy, carrying a scythe, and you, lad, made up like a Witch? And you, you, you!” He thrust his bony finger at each mask. “You don’t … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! A 200-Year-Old Recipe for Pumpkin Pie

    AntiquityNOW
    29 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Pumpkin spice lattes, pumpkin cheesecake, even pumpkin spice Oreos! When the leaves start to change and weather starts to cool, pumpkin season is in full swing. Whether it’s carving one or cooking one, pumpkins just put you into the holiday … Continue reading →
  • Double Trouble: Doppelgangers and the Mythology of Spirit Doubles

    AntiquityNOW
    28 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    It’s almost Halloween! In our recent posts we’ve been delving into why some of us are so drawn to the supernatural, the paranormal and the scaring the pants off terrifying. In today’s post we hurl ourselves once more into the … Continue reading →
  • A Frightful History: Author P J Hodge Presents “The Ghost Hunter”

    AntiquityNOW
    23 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Last Tuesday’s blog explored the neurology of fear and introduced a 2000 year old horror story from Pliny the Younger. Despite its antiquity, this story (actually contained in a missive to an acquaintance by the prolific letter writer) exhibited remarkable … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! An Ancient Roman Salad

    AntiquityNOW
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    This week we’re bringing you a recipe straight out of ancient Rome. The Columella Salad, named for its author, Lucius Junius Moderatus Columella, is the perfect side dish and would fit easily on any modern menu. Yet it was created … Continue reading →
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    Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica

  • Audio News for October 19 to 25, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    27 Oct 2014 | 8:06 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: High-altitude site raises new questions about Ice Age occupation in the Andes (details) Christian quarter found in trading city built by the Golden Horde (details) Gladiator bone analysis confirms vegetarian diet and power drink made of ashes (details) Genetic study shows early links between Easter Island and South America (details)
  • Audio News for October 12 to 18, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Archaeologists discover a link between rock art and living plants in the Chihuahuan Desert of New Mexico (details) Largest known Greek pottery workshop discovered on Sicily (details) High-altitude finds in Wyoming change perspectives on Native American land use (details) Massive temple complex dedicated to Baal the Storm God discovered in Israel (details)
  • Audio News for October 5 to 11, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    13 Oct 2014 | 11:52 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Spanish site shows wealthy, well-organized Bronze Age society (details) New finds help decipher key ritual of the Inca (details) Ancient date for Indonesian cave art may rewrite human history (details) Greek burial confirmed as Philip II, father of Alexander the Great (details)
  • Audio News for September 28 to October 4, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    6 Oct 2014 | 5:53 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Newly discovered pre-Chacoan villages in northern Arizona provide clues to a gap in Southwestern prehistory (details) Archaeological climate study indicates a brief window of opportunity for Polynesian migration (details) A new archaeological perspective on Scandinavian masculinity (details) Canadian researchers confirm the discovery of the doomed HMS Erebus (details)
  • Audio News for September 21 to 27, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:51 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Underwater search seeks signs of ice-age sites in British Columbia (details) Paleolithic site in Armenia suggests human ability to innovate is universal trait (details) New trove of geoglyphs documented in Kazakhstan (details) Ordnance clearing work in Poland finds older weapons, too, from medieval knights (details)
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    MorgansLists.com

  • Images of the Most Beautiful Cockroaches From Around the Internet

    Morgans Lists
    9 Oct 2014 | 10:17 am
    Trilobite CockroachYellow Porcelain RoachNeotropical CockroachBlue CockroachCanopy CockroachBlue-lined CockroachTrilobite CockroachDomino CockroachEllipsidion CockroachBush CockroachForest CockroachBlattodea CockroachBlattodea CockroachTropical CockroachBlattodea CockroachBlattoptera CockroachRainforest CockroachGreen Banana CockroachEucorydia aenea dasytoides CockroachWasp-Mimic CockroachPerisphaerus CockroachCloud Forest Cockroachbeautiful cockroaches, beautiful roaches, cockroaches, colorful cockroaches, Neotropical Cockroach, roaches, Trilobite Cockroach, Cloud Forest…
  • 60 Examples Of Real Medieval Clothing - An Evolution Of Fashion

    Morgans Lists
    24 Sep 2014 | 1:48 pm
    Linen tunic with embroidered "jewelry" from grave of Queen Bathildis. (d. 680; buried at Chelles Abbey)Leggings from the 8th century A.D.Photograph of Skjoldehamn decorated trouserlegs. (Skjold harbor, Norway, ca 1050-1090)Hose belonging to German Emperor Heinrich III., Speyr Dom, 1056.Caftan of a chieftain, covered with Syrian silk featuring senmurvs Early 9th century Moshchevaya Balka burial ground, North-Western Caucasus, Stavropol Region Silk (samite), squirrel fur.Tunic belonging to Heinrich II, first half of the 11th C. Abegg-Stiftung Foundation, Bern.A tunic of the infante Don García…
  • 5 Modern Reptiles That Give Birth To Live Young

    Morgans Lists
    17 Sep 2014 | 12:20 am
    A female Adder giving birth to live young.Ovoviviparous is the term used for reptiles that give birth to live young, which only represents about 20 percent of the modern scaled reptile population. Ovoviviparous species are similar to viviparous species, in that there is internal fertilization and the young are born live, but differ because the young are nourished by egg yolk, as there is no placental connection. Most reptiles give birth to live young, but there are some reptiles that do have placenta like structures capable of transferring nutrients and are therefore considered…
  • When Predators Become Prey - 4 Animals That Twist The Food Chain

    Morgans Lists
    10 Sep 2014 | 1:40 pm
    #1 Frog Devours SnakeNear Queensland, Australia Ian Hamiliton of Australia's Daily Mercury captured these photos of what several articles identify as a Cane Toad, but what may actually be a type of Tree Frog (Litoria), devouring a Brown Tree Snake or a Keelback snake, in a bizarre twist of the normal food chain. The non-venomous Brown Tree Snake usually feeds on birds and even amphibians, so it was a surprise and a treat for many interested parties. A veterinary surgeon interviewed in one newspaper commented, "We have seen snakes eating frogs here but not the other way around. We have…
  • 6 Organisms That Can Survive The Fallout From A Nuclear Explosion

    Morgans Lists
    29 Aug 2014 | 2:13 pm
    An animal's ability to survive the fallout from a nuclear explosion is usually dependent on its ability to withstand radiation, otherwise know as radioresistance. Radioresistant life forms or ionizing-radiation-resistant organisms (IRRO) are a group of organisms that require large doses of radiation, 1000 gray (Gy), to achieve a 90% reduction in their survival rate. To put it in perspective, a human would need anywhere between 4-10 (Gy) to achieve the same result and a dog could withstand even less, about 3.5 (Gy). Gray, with the symbol of (Gy), is a unit of measurement used to describe the…
 
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    NOSAS Archaeology Blog

  • Old routes through Ross-shire: Luib, near Achnasheen, to Scardroy in Strathconon

    nosas
    14 Oct 2014 | 3:24 pm
    by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS) A six mile stretch of rough moorland, west of Achnasheen, is traversed by what was once a well made road generally 3 metres in width. Although it has fallen into disuse and is travelled only by the occasional walker, possibly doing a coast to coast trip, the road today is very distinct and forms a pleasant days’ ramble, especially when combined with an outward journey to Achnasheen on the Kyle of Lochalsh train (with homeward transport parked at Scardroy). But what are the origins of the road? and why did it fall out of use? A route through Strathconon to Loch…
  • Pictish Burial Practices and Remains

    nosas
    12 Oct 2014 | 8:34 am
    by Roland Spencer-Jones (NOSAS) These notes are in preparation for NOSAS field trips to two recognised Pictish cemeteries in the Highland region – Garbeg near Drumnadrochit on Saturday 1st November 2014. See Highland Council HER, RCAHMS Canmore Whitebridge near Foyers on Sunday March 8th 2015. See HER, RCAHMS Canmore The Picts, those most elusive of early medieval Scottish peoples, seem to have disposed of their dead in a variety of ways. Remains that can still be found in the landscape include cremations, simple burials in the ground, long cist burials, burials under cairns, and burials…
  • Excavations at Rhynie 2014

    nosas
    4 Oct 2014 | 1:04 pm
    by Cathy MacIver (Rhynie Community Archaeologist, CMS Archaeology) Earlier in September the Village Square in Rhynie, Aberdeenshire was a bustling hive of activity. Archaeologists, artists and locals got together for a week-long celebration of heritage and hospitality during the Art and Artefact Project (funded by HLF). This project was a collaboration between Dr Gordon Noble (University of Aberdeen) and Rhynie Woman, a local artists collective. The project capitalised on the research and fieldwork undertaken in and around Rhynie since 2005 by Gordon (Aberdeen) and Meggen (Chester) as part…
  • Belladrum Excavation, 31st August – 7th September 2014

    nosas
    15 Sep 2014 | 2:16 pm
    by Roland Spencer-Jones (NOSAS) The Belladrum drama has a Prologue and two Acts, three main protagonists, and a horde (sic) of extras. The Prologue: Enter first Joe Gibbs, landowner at Belladrum and host to the annual August Tartan Heart Festival. During clearing his fields after the Festival, he employs a metal detectorist to identify and get rid of all the left-behind tent pegs. Enter next that said detectorist, Eric Soane, who in August 2009 scanned the site and discovered a scatter of Roman denarii and some mediaeval coins. Enter third, Fraser Hunter, a principal Curator at the National…
  • Highland Hillforts

    nosas
    15 Sep 2014 | 1:54 pm
    by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS) The Atlas of Hillforts in Britain and Ireland project Hillforts are one of the most prominent types of prehistoric monument seen across many parts of Britain and Ireland, and this hillfort project has recently been set up with the aim of producing a paper atlas and an online searchable atlas linked to Google Earth. It is a collaborative four year project between the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh, and contributions from members of the public, either as individuals or as part of local field groups, are welcome. Several members of NOSAS were interested in…
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