Archaeology

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  • Great Dismal Swamp Archaeological Field School, May 13- June 17th

    ArchaeologyOnline: Archaeological Information on the Web
    Anita
    6 Apr 2015 | 6:14 pm
    American University and the Department of Anthropology are pleased to invite students to participate in the 6th Great Dismal Swamp Archaeology Field School to start during the early summer of 2015. The Field School will take place in the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) located in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina (near Norfolk, Suffolk, and Virginia
  • Polynesians Spread Rapidly Across the Tongan Archipelago

    Archaeological Headlines - Archaeology Magazine
    1 May 2015 | 2:30 pm
    BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA—People first arrived on the Tongan island of Tongatapu around 2,800 years ago, according to a study by Marshall Weisler of the University of Queensland and David Burley of Simon Fraser University. In a new study, Weisler and his colleagues obtained dates for coral abraders, animal bones, shell tools, and charcoal from ovens from 20 Lapita sites across the Tongan archipelago using uranium- and radiocarbon-dating techniques. “We now have a precise chronology for the settlement of Tonga and the radiating out and occupying the islands of Tonga,” he told ABC…
  • Heritage destruction in conflict zones provides archaeological opportunities

    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily
    1 May 2015 | 5:17 am
    An international archaeological team is investigating an historic site devastated by conflict in Lebanon. They have demonstrated it is possible to obtain original and important information from heritage sites that have been devastated by conflict.
  • Cambodian military official caught smuggling statues out of the country

    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog
    noelbynature
    30 Apr 2015 | 5:52 am
    A Cambodian official was caught smuggling three statues out of the country when he was checked by the customs officials at the Thai border. Statues confiscated at the Thai-Cambodian border. Source: Phnom Penh Post 20150427 Statues seized at border Phnom Penh Post, 27 April 2015 Army Officer Smuggling Statues Into Thailand Caught at Border Cambodia Daily, 27 April 2015 A military official was arrested in Thailand on Saturday after smuggling three statues across the border from Banteay Meanchey province in his car, officials said Sunday. Prak Sa, chief of the Boeung Trakuon border checkpoint in…
  • SAA 2015: Lithics Cowgirl, Household Archaeologist, Digital Doyenne: A Session Dedicated to Ruth Tringham

    Middle Savagery
    colleenmorgan
    13 Apr 2015 | 9:11 am
    Last Fall I announced the session that I organized, honoring the achievements of Ruth Tringham, my most fantastic colleague. Now the time has come and we have a panel that explores a broad range of topics from Ruth’s career: her ground-breaking research on lithics, household archaeology, digital archaeology, and much more. I hope to see you there! Society for American Archaeology 80th Annual Meeting SATURDAY April 18th, 8:00AM Continental Ballroom 6 08:00 Michael Ashley—Remediated Roads and Flights of Fancy, Travels with Ruth from Past to Present 08:15 Barbara Voytek—From Russia…
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    ArchaeologyOnline: Archaeological Information on the Web

  • Great Dismal Swamp Archaeological Field School, May 13- June 17th

    Anita
    6 Apr 2015 | 6:14 pm
    American University and the Department of Anthropology are pleased to invite students to participate in the 6th Great Dismal Swamp Archaeology Field School to start during the early summer of 2015. The Field School will take place in the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) located in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina (near Norfolk, Suffolk, and Virginia
  • The International Brigades Archaeology Project - September 1-15, 2015

    Anita
    18 Feb 2015 | 6:50 am
    English: Memorial plate for international brigade from London to the Spanish civil war. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) The International Brigades Archaeology Project (IBAP) is studying the sites of the Spanish Civil War in Spain. In 1937, the 15th International Brigade, including the Abraham Lincoln, British, and MacKenzie-Papineau Battalions, was heavily involved in a fierce battle for the small
  • Valcamonica Rock Art and Archaeology Fieldwork & Fieldschool

    Anita
    17 Feb 2015 | 2:29 pm
    From July 16 to August 6 2015 the annual archaeology field school at Paspardo will be open to archaeologists, scholars, students and enthusiasts. This area gives a great opportunity to learn, survey, photograph, draw and catalogue the rock engravings. The program involves field research, documentation, tracing, guided visits and lectures. Fieldwork is organised by Footsteps of Man, Valcamonica.
  • Mount Vernon 2014 Collaborative Historic Preservation Field School May 27- July 3

    Anita
    22 Feb 2014 | 8:23 am
    George Washington’s Mount Vernon, located near Washington, DC, is the historic site dedicated to interpreting the life of the first president within the context of his home and plantation.  The 2014 Mount Vernon/University of Maryland (UMD) Field School in Historic Preservation is in the second year of a multi-year project to explore the archaeological, architectural, and interpretive
  • Strawbery Banke Museum Archaeology Field School 2014

    Anita
    22 Feb 2014 | 8:02 am
    Strawbery Banke Museum (Photo credit: Selbe B) The Strawbery Banke Museum Archaeology Department is pleased to announce its 18th Annual Archaeological Field School! June 23 - July 25, 2014, Monday - Friday 8:30am - 4pm Strawbery Banke Museum is an outdoor living history museum located in historic Portsmouth, NH. Strawbery Banke archaeologists have conducted some of the largest urban
 
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    Archaeological Headlines - Archaeology Magazine

  • Polynesians Spread Rapidly Across the Tongan Archipelago

    1 May 2015 | 2:30 pm
    BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA—People first arrived on the Tongan island of Tongatapu around 2,800 years ago, according to a study by Marshall Weisler of the University of Queensland and David Burley of Simon Fraser University. In a new study, Weisler and his colleagues obtained dates for coral abraders, animal bones, shell tools, and charcoal from ovens from 20 Lapita sites across the Tongan archipelago using uranium- and radiocarbon-dating techniques. “We now have a precise chronology for the settlement of Tonga and the radiating out and occupying the islands of Tonga,” he told ABC…
  • Neolithic Fishing Spear Retains Its Bone Point

    1 May 2015 | 2:00 pm
    LOLLAND, DENMARK—A pronged spear with a center bone point was uncovered during the construction of a tunnel that will connect the German island of Fehmarn with the Danish island of Lolland. “It was found obliquely embedded in the seafloor and must have been lost during fishing at some point in the Neolithic,” Line Marie Olesen of the Museum Lolland-Falster told Discovery News. Known as a leister, this Stone Age spear is the first to have been found with the lateral prongs and the bone point still in place. “It tells us, that in some cases at least, the leisters were…
  • Were Neolithic Societies Egalitarian?

    1 May 2015 | 1:30 pm
    VIZCAYA, SPAIN—Teresa Fernández-Crespo of the University of the Basque Country suggests that late Neolithic and Chalcolithic societies were starting to become hierarchized, based upon data obtained from five megalithic graves in La Rioja and two in Araba-Álava, which together contained the remains of 248 individuals. “We propose that the people buried were intentionally selected,” she said in a press release. “The demographic composition of the megaliths displays significant anomalies with respect to a natural population of an ancient type. The bias…
  • 13th-Century Rune Stick Unearthed in Denmark

    1 May 2015 | 1:00 pm
    ODENSE, DENMARK—A rune stick dating to the thirteenth century has been unearthed among market stalls buried beneath I. Vilhelm Werners Square in Odense. “The stick itself had the consistency of cold butter before it was conserved, and some little devil of a root has gouged its way along the inscription on one side, which is a bit upsetting,” Lisbeth Imer of the National Museum of Denmark said in a press release reported in Science Nordic. The fragile, round stick was found in three pieces that had been carved with the words “good health” and “Tomme his…
  • “Waterloo Uncovered” Discovers Battle’s First Shots

    30 Apr 2015 | 2:30 pm
    GHENT, BELGIUM—Musket balls thought to be from some of the first shots fired in the Battle of Waterloo have been discovered by a team led by Tony Pollard, director of the Centre for Battlefield Archaeology at the University of Glasgow. “The full team has only been working on site for two days and we have made some very interesting discoveries. In particular, we have started a comprehensive survey, including metal detecting, of the area of the former wood to the south of the Hougoumont buildings and we have already found spent and unfired musket shots at the southern-most tip of…
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    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Heritage destruction in conflict zones provides archaeological opportunities

    1 May 2015 | 5:17 am
    An international archaeological team is investigating an historic site devastated by conflict in Lebanon. They have demonstrated it is possible to obtain original and important information from heritage sites that have been devastated by conflict.
  • DNA suggests all early Eskimos migrated from Alaska's North Slope

    29 Apr 2015 | 6:01 am
    Genetic testing of Inupiat people currently living in Alaska's North Slope is helping Northwestern University scientists fill in the blanks on questions about the migration patterns and ancestral pool of the people who populated the North American Arctic over the last 5,000 years.
  • Ancient connection between the Americas enhanced extreme biodiversity

    28 Apr 2015 | 2:17 pm
    Species migrations across the Isthmus of Panama began about 20 million years ago, some six times earlier than commonly assumed, a new study shows.
  • Alternate theory of inhabitation of North America disproven

    27 Apr 2015 | 11:51 am
    The most widely accepted theory of the inhabitation of North America is that humans migrated from Siberia to Alaska by means of a 'land bridge' that spanned the Bering Strait. However, in the 1990s, a small group of researchers proposed that North America was first settled by people from Europe, who moved from east to west via a glacial 'ice bridge.' Now, researchers have definitively disproven the ice bridge theory.
  • Common back problems may be caused by evolution of human locomotion

    27 Apr 2015 | 5:28 am
    A common spinal disease could be the result of some people's vertebrae, the bones that make up the spine, sharing similarities in shape to a non-human primate. The research suggests that the relatively quick evolution of the ability to walk on two legs may have had a substantial impact on modern human health.
 
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    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog

  • Cambodian military official caught smuggling statues out of the country

    noelbynature
    30 Apr 2015 | 5:52 am
    A Cambodian official was caught smuggling three statues out of the country when he was checked by the customs officials at the Thai border. Statues confiscated at the Thai-Cambodian border. Source: Phnom Penh Post 20150427 Statues seized at border Phnom Penh Post, 27 April 2015 Army Officer Smuggling Statues Into Thailand Caught at Border Cambodia Daily, 27 April 2015 A military official was arrested in Thailand on Saturday after smuggling three statues across the border from Banteay Meanchey province in his car, officials said Sunday. Prak Sa, chief of the Boeung Trakuon border checkpoint in…
  • A historical guide to one of Bangkok’s canals

    noelbynature
    30 Apr 2015 | 5:23 am
    A Bangkok Post feature on the historic Krung Kasem canal, which is quite near my workplace, and all the notable sights along it. At the end of the canal is the 600-year-old Wat Thewarat Kunchorn, which is just outside my workplace! Wat Yuan Saphan Khao. Source: Bangkok Post 20150423 Streaming with history Bangkok Post, 23 April 2015 Khlong Phadung Krung Kasem is likely to become one of Bangkok’s major transportation routes once again due to government support, and this may also benefit tourism. Building of the canal was commissioned by King Rama IV in 1851 to serve as the outer city…
  • Rock art discovered in eastern Indonesia

    noelbynature
    29 Apr 2015 | 6:59 pm
    A new rock art site has been discovered in the Kei Islands of Indonesia’s Maluku Province, as well as in the Aru Islands. Ohoidertaun rock paintings discovered in Kei islands Antara News, 25 April 2015 Ancient rock paintings have been discovered in the Ohoidertaun village of Kei islands. These include at least 400 images, among others of humans, hand prints, trees, and boats, the head of Ambons archaeology office Muh. Husni said on Friday. “Up to now, the Mesolithic discovery was still the most image-contained rock panting that had been found in the Maluku province,” he…
  • Chinese ceramics suggest presence of a ruler in ancient Singapore

    noelbynature
    29 Apr 2015 | 6:06 pm
    Preliminary finds of a specific type Chinese Ming ware used as gifts for overseas leaders suggest that ancient Singapore may have been the seat of a local ruler who was recognised by the Chinese. Excavation at Empress Place. Source: The Straits Times 20150426 Archaeological discoveries dig deeper into past The Straits Times, 26 April 2015 Archaeological discoveries keep confirming that there was a thriving community here long before Stamford Raffles “created” Singapore in the 19th century. The latest evidence suggests that Temasek, or ancient Singapore, could have had an…
  • Lithophone found in central Vietnam

    noelbynature
    29 Apr 2015 | 5:50 pm
    A farmer in Quang Binh Province unearthed what is thought to be a set of stone gongs, which has been donated to the local museum. Supposed lithophone found in Quang Binh province. Source: Viet Nam News 20150424 Farmer discovers lithophone in Quang Binh Viet Nam News, 24 April 2015 The general museum of the central Quang Binh Province yesterday announced the discovery of a lithophone. Farmer Pham Dinh Huyen was digging in his garden in Cu Nam Commune in the province’s Bo Trach District, when he found 20 unique rock pieces 2m below the surface. The rocks produced musical sounds when Huyen…
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    Middle Savagery

  • SAA 2015: Lithics Cowgirl, Household Archaeologist, Digital Doyenne: A Session Dedicated to Ruth Tringham

    colleenmorgan
    13 Apr 2015 | 9:11 am
    Last Fall I announced the session that I organized, honoring the achievements of Ruth Tringham, my most fantastic colleague. Now the time has come and we have a panel that explores a broad range of topics from Ruth’s career: her ground-breaking research on lithics, household archaeology, digital archaeology, and much more. I hope to see you there! Society for American Archaeology 80th Annual Meeting SATURDAY April 18th, 8:00AM Continental Ballroom 6 08:00 Michael Ashley—Remediated Roads and Flights of Fancy, Travels with Ruth from Past to Present 08:15 Barbara Voytek—From Russia…
  • CAA 2015: The Death (and Afterlife) of Archaeological Photography

    colleenmorgan
    1 Apr 2015 | 2:55 am
    Hello from lovely Siena! In about an hour I will be presenting in the Towards a Theory of Practice in Applied Digital Field Methods session at the CAA conference. It’s my first CAA–it is usually too close to SAA to manage, but I thought I’d try both this year. Anyway, here’s my paper title & abstract: Title: The Death (and Afterlife) of Archaeological Photography Abstract:  The second wave of digital photography in archaeology, including HDR, photogrammetry, textures for 3D objects, time-lapse, drone photography, and screen-shots from google earth has…
  • Eating Weeds in the Arab World

    colleenmorgan
    26 Mar 2015 | 11:48 pm
    Purslane salad, by Esto. Portulaca oleracea. The first time I tried it, was, admittedly, in Turkey. It was probably relatively early in the season at Çatalhöyük, when the dig house cooks were only feeding 40-50 people instead of the 100+ ravening hoards. There were tomatoes, cucumber, and a slightly tangy, green succulent seasoned with olive oil and lemon juice. What was it? I had to know. Semizotu. When I got back to California I tried to figure out what it was exactly–even in the vast foodie farmers markets the vendors had no idea what I was talking about. Semizotu? What? Finally…
  • Navigating Brutalism at the 100 Minories Archaeology Project

    colleenmorgan
    5 Mar 2015 | 7:48 am
    Back in 2012, Dan and I worked at the fantastic 100 Minories project with L-P Archaeology. They’re some of my favorite people, so I was sad that I was not able to work with them on the excavation phase of the project, which is currently in full swing. I have two blog posts about the evaluation stage, wherein archaeologists dug to 7m deep, punching test pits through the thick London stratigraphy: 100 Minories Project Diggin’ Deep at 100 Minories They have their own, very nice project website now, take a gander: http://100minories.lparchaeology.com/  And they’ve featured…
  • Mornings in the Manor

    colleenmorgan
    2 Mar 2015 | 1:15 am
      It was all so new, a year ago, when I described the over and under and through of my commute to work, walking through a microcosm of English history. Now it passes in a blur, I’m either in my headphones listening to a podcast or buzzing by on my lovely Gazelle–the sturdy Danish bicycle that I steer over frozen cobblestones and muddy, overgrown pathways. I was delayed this morning by a brief flurry of snow, predicated by an Easter pink and yellow sky. I don’t notice my commute much, and a lot of the culture shock has worn off. Now I hear my previous self in other…
 
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    Looting Matters

  • Nighthawking and Hertfordshire

    David Gill
    28 Apr 2015 | 12:30 am
    I note that Hertfordshire Constabulary have issued some guidance over 'nighthawking'. Over the county boundary in Essex a 'Heritage Watch' scheme has been launched.
  • Metal-detecting at Castlerigg Stone Circle

    David Gill
    27 Apr 2015 | 2:26 pm
    Video shot taken inside the circle. Posted April 2015.The Castlerigg stone circle is located near Keswick in Cumbria. Aurbrey Burl describes is as 'one of the earliest circles in Europe' (Burl, no. 18). The site is under the guardianship of English Heritage and is managed by the National Trust. (It was taken into State care in 1883.)A video posted on YouTube in April 2015 [12 minutes] noted what appears to be metal-detecting activity on the site, including within the circle.The stone circle was "... one of the earliest Ancient Scheduled Monuments ever designated in the UK, giving it special…
  • Archaeological looting in Spain

    David Gill
    27 Apr 2015 | 2:30 am
    Ignacio Rodríguez Temiño and Antonio Roma Valdés have written an important study "Fighting against the archaeological looting and the illicit trade of antiquities in Spain" for International Journal of Cultural Property 22,1 (2015) 111-30. [Available here]Abstract During the seventies, archaeological looting, of both land and underwater sites, not only was widespread in Spain, but also went unpunished. This situation stemmed from a lack of effective administrative and criminal legislation, human resources to combat the plague, and educational policies warning of how harmful such…
  • The Houston bronze krater

    David Gill
    23 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    The bronze krater (once) on loan to Houston is mentioned by Monica S. Dugot, Thomas R. Kline, Jennifer Anglim Kreder, and Lucille A. Roussin, "Legal and Ethical Problems in Art Restitution", in a paper given in New York on April 4, 2008.... a bronze krater is currently on loan to the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston from the Shelby White –Leon Levy collection, and there are calls for the museum to release its provenience history. As far as I know the collecting history for this krater has not been released.Interestingly the cases relating to cultural property in Minneapolis (2011)…
  • Operation Mummy's Curse

    David Gill
    23 Apr 2015 | 3:44 am
    Source: ICE.There are times when you wonder if there is a lack of imagination when it comes to naming operations but 'Mummy's Curse' is probably one of them.Put that aside, ICE has announced that it is has returned "dozens" of Egyptian antiquities to Egypt as part of an "ongoing five-year investigation by ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) targeting an international criminal network that illegally smuggled and imported more than 7,000 cultural items from around the world". The total value of the seizures so far is approximately $3 million.This sarcophagus appears to be the one…
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    Theoretical Structural Archaeology

  • Building the Past - in Ohio

    Geoff Carter
    30 Apr 2015 | 8:38 am
    I have been blogging about the archaeology of structures for nearly 7 years, during which Google tells me I have a little over half a million page views; some of this self-selecting audience get in touch and we take things further.One such was Bill Kennedy; we share an interest in modelling  archaeological structures from their foundations, only he builds full scale Prehistoric Native American structures at Sun Watch nr. Dayton, while I like mine to fit on my drawing board or hard disc.So, at Bill’s instigation, we have written a chapter together in Building the Past: Prehistoric…
  • Imaginary woods

    Geoff Carter
    13 Mar 2015 | 1:30 pm
    Often, when we think about the past, we do so in our imaginations, using the pictures and impressions we have picked from our shared visual culture, we mix the real things we find into a fantasy world.  Envisioning the environment in terms of its familiar topography and plants does not present much of a problem, domestic animals are bits hazier, but most of the things that made up the fabric of life just don’t survive here in our damp climate.  However, even trees in the picture may not be clear, the focus of archaeology is on tools, seldom extending to a consideration of the…
  • Where is the woodshed?

    Geoff Carter
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:47 pm
    Much of the material culture of past was fabricated from timber, and, just as significantly, fuelled by wood, a material that is usually invisible to archaeology.  Thus, provision for fuel storage, like sanitation and water supply, is one of the basics that have to be considered in the analysis of built environments.Traditionally, firewood is measured by stacked volume; a “cord” being a stack of 8x4x4 feet, or 128 cubic feet, including the spaces between logs.[1]  The calorific value of a cord will depend mostly on the actual mass of solid wood and its density, so it is…
  • The Northern Frontier; lilies, Latin, and illiteracy

    Geoff Carter
    20 Jan 2015 | 12:52 pm
    Some readers, new to archaeology, particularly students like those on MOOC courses, discover that the evidence based arguments about Roman Military archaeology found on this blog , are not well received by their tutors.  It is important to understand that many academics can only understand archaeology when it is written down, having no experience of real archaeological interpretation. As a result, the text of an archaeological report, rather than the evidence can become an article of faith, and ideas become embedded at a fundamental level, immovable objects, that actual…
  • De-turfing Hadrian’s Wall

    Geoff Carter
    28 Dec 2014 | 12:35 pm
    I have argued the postholes found on the berm of Hadrian’s Wall are the remains of the a timber rampart, which together with theTurf Wall, formed the primary rampart and ditch phase of the frontier.[here] Recent work by Eric Graafstal also suggests the turf wall was the very first part of Hadrian’s Wall, and would date this phase to 119 AD, although the author believes that the Turf Wall was built in isolation against the tribes in SW Scotland [1].  Unfortunately, this leaves the Turf Wall dangling, awaiting the eventual arrival of the Stone Wall in centre of the country, and also…
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    Stone Pages Archaeo News

  • Altamira cave paintings under threat again

    4 May 2015 | 10:11 am
    Inadvertently, precious cave paintings are being irretrievably damaged by the people flocking to view them. The cave paintings in question are those in the Altamira cave in Spain. It is...
  • More light shed on European origins

    4 May 2015 | 10:11 am
    The question of 'where did we come from?' has been posed many times over the millennia, particularly when it comes to the origins of European peoples and their cultures. Traditional...
  • Iron Age tumulus discovered near Paris

    4 May 2015 | 10:10 am
    In France, as in many European countries, part of the planning process for any new development incorporates the requirement for an archaeological investigation of the site, before any building or...
  • Ancient Sharjahan site found

    29 Apr 2015 | 3:47 am
    Stone axes, scrapers and awls thought to date back hundreds of thousands of years have been unearthed at a newly discovered archaeological site in Al Dhaid, the central district of...
  • Megalithic burial site discovered in India

    29 Apr 2015 | 3:46 am
    An early Iron Age megalithic burial site dated to black and red ware period (12th - 9th century BCE) was excavated at Vadamalakunda in the of Krishnagiri-Andhra Pradesh border (India)....
 
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    Archaeology News from Past Horizons

  • Comparing early Rome and Naples

    Past Horizons
    4 May 2015 | 3:51 am
    Geology was a major contributor to the fortune of Rome, which had more resources and reduced risks relative to Naples. Related posts: Ancient cities not so different to modern ones Rare first edition of ‘The Map that Changed the World’ unearthed Study identifies potential grass route for early African cattle herders Project Eliseg: Digging for early medieval myths and memories Studies show early contact between Easter Island and the Americas
  • Teeth tell story about people buried at Harappa

    Past Horizons
    30 Apr 2015 | 5:09 am
    Dental enamel and chemical analyses of the water, fauna and rocks, using isotope ratios of lead and strontium has given some insight into individuals buried at the Indus Valley city of Harappa. Related posts: Researchers examine diet of 2000 year old Paracas people Understanding the people of the lake Grooves in Neanderthal teeth suggests division of labour between sexes Teeth from Irish famine era could help predict future health of children Examination of Polish deviant burials show they were non-immigrant
  • DNA results supports North Slope as origin for peopling of the eastern Arctic

    Past Horizons
    29 Apr 2015 | 12:05 pm
    Genetic testing of Iñupiat people currently living in Alaska's North Slope is helping Northwestern University scientists fill in the blanks on questions about the migration patterns and ancestral pool of the people who populated the North American Arctic over the last 5,000 years. Related posts: First inhabitants of Arctic not related to the Inuit Inconsistencies in peopling of North America ‘ice bridge’ theory revealed (Memo)First atlas of Inuit Arctic trails launched Tracking the origin and evolution of maize in the U.S. Southwest Research supports Neanderthals as a separate…
  • Why millet was not a staple crop in the East Tibetan Highlands after 2,000 BC

    Past Horizons
    29 Apr 2015 | 4:12 am
    New research explains why the area's original inhabitants either left or so abruptly changed their lifestyles around four thousand years ago. Related posts: Pinpointing early sustained farming on the Tibetan Plateau Dental calculus reveals sweet potato as staple food for pre-contact Easter Islanders Crop irrigation in Mesopotamia may have spread disease Localised drought contributed to 13th century southwest Colorado depopulation Domestic cereals in evidence 7,000 years ago in Sudan
  • Technological innovation may not have led modern humans into Europe

    Past Horizons
    28 Apr 2015 | 12:13 pm
    Traditionally, it was believed that innovation in weapons enabled humans to spread into Europe, but a new study suggests that we moved from west Asia to Europe without a big change in behaviour. Related posts: 43,500 year old modern human presence in Europe 55,000 year old skull in Galilee cave connects Africa to Europe Australopithecus africanus used their hands like modern humans Genome sequence of 45,000 year-old Siberian Humans adapted to rain forests earlier than previously thought
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    The Archaeology News Network

  • Zominthos archaeological site damaged by looters

    3 May 2015 | 8:30 am
    Greece's culture ministry has announced that work will begin on Monday to restored damage caused by illegal digging carried out by looters at the Zominthos archaeological site, on Mount Psiloritis on Crete. According to experts, there are signs that the site was vandalised and disturbed. The Neopalatial building at Zominthos  [Credit: Michael Cosmopoulos]In an announcement issued on Sunday, the ministry reported damage in three... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Cairo’s Blue Mosque opens after 6-year restoration

    3 May 2015 | 7:00 am
    The 14th century mosque of the Amir Aqsunqur, better known as the Blue Mosque, has been opened to the public Saturday after the completion of a six-year renovation project. The Blue Mosque in the Bab al-Wazir district of Cairo, built in 1347  by Amir Aqsunqur [Credit: Marc Lacoste/WikiCommons]The mosque had been closed since 1992 due to damage it had suffered from an earthquake in the same year. As part of the Al-Darb al-Ahmar... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Dental enamel reveals surprising migration patterns in ancient Indus civilizations

    2 May 2015 | 11:00 am
    University of Florida researchers have discovered that ancient peoples in the Indus Valley apparently did not stay put, as was previously thought. Equally surprising is how they found out: by examining 4,000-year-old teeth. The so-called "Priest King" statue from Mohenjo-Daro, late Mature Harappan period,  National Museum, Karachi, Pakistan [Credit: WikiCommons]When tooth enamel forms, it incorporates elements from the local... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Neolithic fishing spear found in southern Denmark

    2 May 2015 | 10:00 am
    At the archaeological investigations ahead of the construction of the future Fehmarn Belt Fixed Link, archaeologists from Museum Lolland-Falster have found an object that attracts particular attention. Jammed into the marine sediments was the head part of a fragmented fishing leister consisting of parts from both lateral prongs and a bone point slightly offset between them. It has long been presumed that there was a link between... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Nazca geoglyphs marked ritual pathways, claims new study

    2 May 2015 | 9:00 am
    The Nazca Lines, a series of fantastical geoglyphs etched into the desert in Peru, may have been used by two separate groups of people to make pilgrimage to an ancient temple, new research suggests. But the purpose of the desert etchings may have changed over time. One of the most famous of the geoglyphs, an enigmatic supernatural creature  called "The Astronaut" [Credit: Raymond Ostertag/WikiCommons]The earliest Nazca Lines were... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    The Mathisen Corollary

  • The Djed Column every day: Yoga

    David Warner Mathisen
    30 Apr 2015 | 12:20 am
    The past several posts have examined the concept of "raising the Djed" (cultivating and evoking and amplifying the spiritual, invisible, divine spark in ourselves and in the universe we travel through), the possibility that we can in some way incorporate this concept into daily life, and some of the multitude of practices for doing so which cultures from around the world have preserved from ancient times.Part of the reason for this short survey is to bring the discussion of what may seem at times to be a very esoteric and philosophical topic "down to earth" and suggest that it is actually an…
  • The Djed Column everyday: Tantra and Fong Zhong Shu

    David Warner Mathisen
    28 Apr 2015 | 2:39 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).If all the world's sacred scriptures and mythology actually consist of stories in which the motions of the celestial spheres take on the personalities of men, women, gods, goddesses, angels, demons, monsters, djinn, and other mystical creatures (and they most certainly do), then we are left with a very important question: Why?I believe the answer certainly includes as a central feature the profound teaching embodied in the Great Cross of the Year, formed by the solstices and equinoxes, and associated with the concept symbolized in ancient Egypt by the "casting…
  • New Osiris video, and new "video archive" section

    David Warner Mathisen
    24 Apr 2015 | 6:55 am
    I've just added a new video to help illustrate some of the concepts discussed in the previous post.The video is entitled "The Celestial Djed: Orion - Osiris" and is about five minutes and fifty-three seconds in length.This is (I believe) a much clearer and better version than the video that was originally included with the previous post, and it was just posted this morning (Friday, April 24, 2015 in California -- although it is already April 25 in some parts of the globe), so if you have only seen the previous version you may want to have a look at this one (above).Additionally, I have now…
  • The Djed Column every day: Earendil

    David Warner Mathisen
    22 Apr 2015 | 7:06 pm
    Orion rising on the eastern horizon (left), crossing the center of the southern sky (center, directly over the letter "S"), and sinking down into the west (right). (Click to enlarge). Planetarium app: stellarium.org.In the previous post, we took what appeared to be a quick break from the discussion in the preceding posts regarding one of the central foundational themes of all the world's ancient myths: the dual physical-spiritual nature of human existence and indeed the dual physical-spiritual nature of the world / universe / cosmos in which we find ourselves, embodied in the great annual…
  • The Lord of the Rings, the Power of Music, and the Stories that Really Matter

    David Warner Mathisen
    20 Apr 2015 | 1:49 am
    (video link).I'm taking a brief intermission from the "ecstasy every day" mini-series to report on an unforgettable experience I had the opportunity to be part of this weekend with my extended family, at the San Jose Center for the Performing Arts where the Symphony Silicon Valley along with the Symphony Silicon Valley Chorale, the Ragazzi Boy's Choir and the Cantabile Youth Singers performed the entire musical score of the Lord of the Rings live, as the movies themselves played on an enormous big-screen overhead (with the original soundtrack from which the musical score had been removed in…
 
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    AntiquityNOW

  • AntiquityNOW Month: Make Something Monday! Ancient Pictographs and Hand Stencil Activity

    AntiquityNOW
    4 May 2015 | 2:00 am
    It’s AntiquityNOW Month! Pictograms and pictographs have been telling stories for thousands of years. Read more here.  Click here to visit a website with instructions on how to create your very own hand stencil.
  • Factoid Friday! Ancient Ice Cream

    AntiquityNOW
    1 May 2015 | 2:00 am
    The origins of ice cream most likely began with ice that was flavored with fruit and essences by the ancient Chinese around 3000 BCE. Learn more about ice cream and the 5,000 year old delectable history of the hot fudge sundae.
  • The Nepal Earthquake: Cultural Heritage and the Soul of a People

    AntiquityNOW
    30 Apr 2015 | 2:00 am
    How do societies define themselves? To some degree or another, they look to the past. Where their people originated, the gods who have guided and protected them, their cultural accomplishments through the ages and the ancient sites that embody their … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! Mung Bean Quinoa Soup

    AntiquityNOW
    29 Apr 2015 | 2:00 am
    The mung bean. The name doesn’t inspire thoughts of deliciousness, the tongue doesn’t begin to water with anticipation of scrumptiousness, but maybe it should. Perhaps the rest of the world needs to get on board with a fact that India … Continue reading →
  • AntiquityNOW Month is Almost Here!

    AntiquityNOW
    28 Apr 2015 | 2:00 am
    This Friday is the start of the second annual AntiquityNOW Month when we celebrate all things ancient, with a modern twist! There are plenty of ways for you to join in as we look to the past for some of … Continue reading →
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    Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica

  • Audio News for April 19 to 25, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    27 Apr 2015 | 5:15 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Mysterious find of mercury may lead to tomb in Teotihuacan (details) Royal tomb in Egypt's delta raises new questions about ancient provinces (details) Clam gardens were constructed for sustainable seafood source in early Pacific Northwest (a href="http://www.sfu.ca/university-communications/media-releases/2015/study-finds-ancient-clam-beaches-not-so-natural.html">details) How to cure a hangover in Hellenistic Egypt (details)
  • Audio News for April 12 to 18, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    20 Apr 2015 | 4:32 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Roman ceramic graffiti illustrates vernacular Latin (details) Spanish cave holds the earliest known European tool set (details) New finds fill in the gaps in the Great Wall of China (a href="http://europe.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2015-04/15/content_20441162.htm">details) Pre-Columbian trade across the Bering Strait (details)
  • Audio News for April 5 to 11, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    13 Apr 2015 | 4:45 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Greek graves used first in Neolithic, then again by Myceneans (details) Peruvian tomb site may show how political stress was resolved (details) Korean tomb reveals powerful woman and the man sacrificed to guard her (details) Research continues in southern Iraq with finds from Babylonian times (details)
  • Audio News for March 29 to April 4, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    6 Apr 2015 | 7:44 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Medieval salve may be a remedy for MRSA (details) Over 1,000 medieval burials come to light beneath an English school (details) 17th century camel skeleton analyzed from Austria’s Danube valley (details) Utah site yields tool kit left by Clovis contemporaries (details)
  • Audio News for March 22 to 28, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    30 Mar 2015 | 11:28 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Huge underground city found in Cappadocia (details) Construction of ritual centers was the force that built early Maya society (details) Neolithic farmers in Italy defleshed their dead in ritual cave placement (details) World's earliest evidence of breast cancer found in Egyptian burial (details)
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    NOSAS Archaeology Blog

  • Mulchaich 18th Century Distillery, Ross-shire: a NOSAS Project

    nosas
    26 Apr 2015 | 8:50 am
    by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS) NOSAS members working at Mulchaich 16th August 2013 Over the years tradition has had it that there are the remains of a distillery dating back to the 18th Century at Mulchaich Farm, located in the district of Ferintosh on the Black Isle. The distillery site is about 200m NW of the farm and was previously unrecorded; it was in a sorry state being quite overgrown with whins and with the few open areas grossly trampled by cattle. In 2009 members of the North of Scotland Archaeological Society began a project which had as one of its aims the surveying and recording of…
  • The Rosemarkie Caves Project

    nosas
    20 Apr 2015 | 2:08 pm
    by Simon Gunn (NOSAS) The subterranean section of NOSAS, the Rosemarkie Caves Project (RCP), is planning more work in the caves this year (2015). The RCP was set up to research the archaeology of the caves on the Moray Firth coast near Rosemarkie. The group started its work in 2006 with a weekend excavation of Learnie 2B when evidence was found of occupation and leatherwork in the 19th century, probably by summer travellers. This was followed by a more ambitious 14 day dig at Cairds’ Cave in 2010, when we confirmed that the cave had been excavated 100 years before by local doctor…
  • The Church of the Immaculate Conception, Whitebridge

    nosas
    2 Apr 2015 | 4:13 am
    by Marion Ruscoe (NOSAS) During a recent NOSAS field trip to archaeological sites on the east of Loch Ness, our attention was drawn to the Roman Catholic Chapel near Whitebridge (NH 49496 17045 – HER ID MHG47419) which is situated close to the Pictish Cemetery there. The architectural style is deceptively simple, suggesting an earlier building date than was actually the case, and perhaps also reflecting a continuity with the croft buildings which must have preceded it. The following is the result of my research into the history of the site and its architecture. By the middle of…
  • Experiments using a Quadcopter for Archaeological Aerial Photography

    nosas
    28 Mar 2015 | 3:57 pm
    by Alan Thompson (NOSAS) Introduction I’ve had my Quadcopter for over a year now, had great fun flying it, and have produced many interesting images.  I recently showed a selection of images at a NOSAS evening, and was asked if I would write this blog and share some of the things I’ve learned along the way. Of course the pictures are what it’s all about and even if you’re not interested in my comments, I hope you enjoy looking at them. Background Inspired by some of the wonderful aerial photos (APs) I’ve seen (for example on Canmore) I have long thought how good…
  • A Bronze Age Cist Burial in Drumnadrochit

    nosas
    7 Feb 2015 | 4:52 pm
    by James McComas (NOSAS) Drumnadrochit, by Loch Ness. On the flat former croft land between the Rivers Coilte and Enrick a new NHS Medical Centre is under construction. In January 2015 workers on the site removed a large stone slab. Beneath the slab, undisturbed for perhaps 4500 years, were the crouched remains of an individual resting in a stone lined cist, approximately 0.7 metres deep. Burial Cist in Drumnadrochit (Courtesy of Mary Peteranna/ AOC) Initially Highland Council archaeologists assessed the site, concluding it was probably bronze age.  A skull and possible femur were clearly…
 
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    eaglesanddragonspublishing.com

  • Quiet and Contemplative – Essentials for Writing Historical Fiction

    AdamAH
    27 Apr 2015 | 5:45 pm
    There is a truth which I have forgotten lately. With the day-to-day workings of my modern, connected life, I’ve been missing out on something essential, something that in the past has always helped me to nurture my creativity, and better my historical fiction. What is it? Quiet. Yes. That illusive modern-day grail, that has the power to slow us down, to help us think, to regroup and empower ourselves. Now that I write that, it really does seem obvious, not ground-breaking at all. But it is, and I’ve found that without taking some calm time to contemplate the past, my fiction suffers. Like…
  • The World of Children of Apollo – Part V – Etruria

    AdamAH
    20 Apr 2015 | 6:36 pm
    In the previous installment we visited Rome, the centre of the world when the Roman Empire was at its greatest extent. We will now leave that ancient city for an even more ancient landscape. What we know today as Tuscany, the central and western region of Italy, was then part of the larger central Italian kingdom of Etruria. This region plays a large role in Children of Apollo, as it is the ancestral land of Lucius Metellus Anguis’ family. For them, the family estate is a place of childhood memory, of escape, and of mystery. Their roots run deep in that ancient land. Chimera of Arezzo I…
  • Humour in the Ancient World

    AdamAH
    14 Apr 2015 | 7:14 pm
    Laughing Legionaries An Abderite saw a eunuch and asked him how many kids he had. When that guy said that he didn’t have the balls, so as to be able to have children, the Abderite asked when he was going to get the balls (Philagelos, #114) Is that funny to you? A little? Or does it make you scratch your head and wonder if I’ve gone off the deep end? It’s not my joke, thankfully. In truth, I’m not a very funny person, but I do enjoy a good laugh, as many of us do. The joke above is actually a Roman joke about 2000 years old. Yes, that old. It’s one of 250-odd jokes in the oldest…
  • Book Reading – Chariot of the Son

    AdamAH
    8 Apr 2015 | 6:47 pm
    Hello everyone! Well, I’ve done it! I’ve gone and posted my first foray into video book readings. If you watched the video above, I hope you enjoyed it. Feel free to share it around. Yes, I know. I’m a bit awkward, and not entirely video-friendly (or is it that video is not friendly to me?). But, if I don’t try new things out, and take some risks, new adventures will remain out of reach. With time, I promise I’ll find my video groove. Lest we forget, these stories were a part of an ancient oral tradition, and were meant to be spoken aloud. What would ‘the poet’ think of…
  • The Amphipolis Tomb – The Discoveries and Theories

    AdamAH
    30 Mar 2015 | 6:25 pm
    Over the past months, the on-line world has been set ablaze with Greek fire. By that, I mean that the talk in ancient history and archaeology circles has been dominated by one of the most exciting discoveries in recent memory – The Amphipolis Tomb. You may have heard about this ‘Alexander the Great era’ tomb in media around the world. The Rumours and theories about what it contains are as thick and the sarrissae of a Macedonian phalanx. So, I thought I would use this post to go over the various finds, and some of the theories we’ve seen thus far. But first, here’s a video of an…
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