Archaeology

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  • Divers sure of new finds at Antikythera shipwreck

    The Archaeology News Network
    15 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    Archaeologists set out Monday to use a revolutionary new deep sea diving suit to explore the ancient shipwreck where one of the most remarkable scientific objects of antiquity was found. A picture taken at the Archaeological Museum in Athens on September 14, 2014 shows  pieces of the so-called Antikythera Mechanism, a 2nd-century BC device known  as the world’s oldest computer, which was discovered by sponge divers in... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Historical Oracles

    archaeology - Yahoo News Search Results
    17 Sep 2014 | 1:40 pm
    The Mississippi Archaeology Expo brings expert presenters to Jacksonians of all ages.
  • Shipwrecks Tell Story of California’s Past

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine
    17 Sep 2014 | 2:30 pm
    SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA—Members of a NOAA research team used remote-controlled cameras and sensing equipment to investigate the shipwrecks in the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary and the adjacent Golden Gate National Recreation Area. They were able to identify the SS Selja, which sank after a fatal collision in 1910. The resulting legal case was ultimately argued before the U.S. Supreme Court over a key aspect of maritime law, the “rule of the road.” The Gold-Rush era clipper ship Noonday was also found beneath mud and silt on the ocean floor. An early steam tugboat has yet to be…
  • Modern forensic techniques identify most likely cause of King Richard III’s death

    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily
    17 Sep 2014 | 4:31 am
    The remains of King Richard III —- the last English monarch to die in battle -— were found under a car park in Leicester by archaeologists. The forensic imaging team used whole body CT scans and micro-CT imaging of injured bones to analyse trauma to the 500-year-old skeleton carefully, and to determine which of the King's wounds might have proved fatal.
  • The September edition of the Video News from TAC, online and on TV

    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek
    Rick Pettigrew
    15 Sep 2014 | 2:12 pm
    Friends and colleagues: The latest installment of the Video News from TAC features the following story: * Filmmaker Tashi Wangchuk followed Tsering Dorjee, exiled Tibetan folk artist, for about six months with a camera to make a film about displaced Tibetans in exile. This film is a real life story about Dorjee and his initiative in passing down centuries-old Tibetan literature and performing arts that are being erased inside Tibet to the Tibetan younger generation in the San Francisco Bay area. He does this through the community’s Sunday school and the school’s annual day event, which…
 
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    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine

  • Shipwrecks Tell Story of California’s Past

    17 Sep 2014 | 2:30 pm
    SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA—Members of a NOAA research team used remote-controlled cameras and sensing equipment to investigate the shipwrecks in the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary and the adjacent Golden Gate National Recreation Area. They were able to identify the SS Selja, which sank after a fatal collision in 1910. The resulting legal case was ultimately argued before the U.S. Supreme Court over a key aspect of maritime law, the “rule of the road.” The Gold-Rush era clipper ship Noonday was also found beneath mud and silt on the ocean floor. An early steam tugboat has yet to be…
  • Hairstyles from Akhenaten’s Ancient Egyptian City

    17 Sep 2014 | 2:00 pm
    CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND—Archaeologist Jolanda Bos of the Armana Project has analyzed a selection of 100 recently excavated skulls from the Armana cemetery. Twenty-eight of those skulls still had hair, including that of one woman who had “a very complex coiffure with approximately 70 extensions fastened in different layers and heights on the head,” Bos wrote in the Journal of Egyptian Archaeology. She thinks that the hair was probably styled after death, but such elaborate styles, held together with some kind of fat, were also likely a part of daily life. The skulls had hair ranging from very…
  • Richard III’s Injuries Suggest He’d Removed His Helmet

    17 Sep 2014 | 1:30 pm
    LEICESTER, ENGLAND—A new study published in The Lancet concludes that Richard III suffered 11 wounds—nine of them to the skull—at the time of his death at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485. The team of forensic scientists from the University of Leicester used whole body CT scans and micro-CT imaging of injured bones to see which of the wounds might have been fatal, and to determine which weapons had caused the injuries. “Richard’s injuries represent a sustained attack or an attack by several assailants with weapons from the later medieval period. The wounds to the skull suggest…
  • Gas Chamber Found at Sobibór Death Camp

    17 Sep 2014 | 1:00 pm
    WARSAW, POLAND—Holocaust researchers from Israel’s Yad Vashem and Poland’s Majdanek State Museum announced that they have found the exact location of the building that housed the gas chambers at Sobibór, a Nazi death camp in occupied Poland that killed an estimated 250,000 Jewish people between April 1942 and October 1943. The Germans dismantled the camp during the war, after a prisoner revolt in which several German officers and guards were killed. There were very few survivors. “Any small piece of information we can add to our knowledge is a great thing,” Israeli archaeologist…
  • Survey of Gallipoli Battlefield Continues

    16 Sep 2014 | 2:30 pm
    GALLIPOLI, TURKEY—Archaeologists from Turkey, Australia, and New Zealand are wrapping up a five-year project to survey the World War I battlefield site on the Gallipoli Peninsula. For eight months, Turkish soldiers of the Ottoman Empire and the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) engaged in trench warfare. “We are trying to find out what’s still there and what we can learn from it,” retired Rear Admiral and Australia’s team leader Simon Harrington told The Age. They have found latrines, bomb shelters, command posts, and trenches from the battle lines. “An individual find…
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    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Modern forensic techniques identify most likely cause of King Richard III’s death

    17 Sep 2014 | 4:31 am
    The remains of King Richard III —- the last English monarch to die in battle -— were found under a car park in Leicester by archaeologists. The forensic imaging team used whole body CT scans and micro-CT imaging of injured bones to analyse trauma to the 500-year-old skeleton carefully, and to determine which of the King's wounds might have proved fatal.
  • Hitting the jackpot on a dig in Gernsheim: Long lost Roman fort discovered

    15 Sep 2014 | 5:37 am
    In the course of an educational dig in Gernsheim in the Hessian Ried, archaeologists have discovered a long lost Roman fort: A troop unit made up out of approximately 500 soldiers (known as a cohort)  was stationed there between 70/80 and 110/120 AD. Over the past weeks, the archaeologists found two V-shaped ditches, typical of this type of fort, and the post holes of a wooden defensive tower as well as other evidence from the time after the fort was abandoned.
  • Scientists report first semiaquatic dinosaur, Spinosaurus: Massive predator was more than 9 feet longer than largest T. rex

    11 Sep 2014 | 11:27 am
    Scientists today unveiled what appears to be the first truly semiaquatic dinosaur, Spinosaurus aegyptiacus. New fossils of the massive Cretaceous-era predator reveal it adapted to life in the water some 95 million years ago, providing the most compelling evidence to date of a dinosaur able to live and hunt in an aquatic environment. The fossils also indicate that Spinosaurus was the largest known predatory dinosaur to roam the Earth, measuring more than nine feet longer than the world's largest Tyrannosaurus rex specimen.
  • New digital map reveals stunning hidden archaeology of Stonehenge

    9 Sep 2014 | 4:21 pm
    A host of previously unknown archaeological monuments have been discovered around Stonehenge as part of an unprecedented digital mapping project that will transform our knowledge of this iconic landscape -- including remarkable new findings on the world's largest 'super henge,' Durrington Walls.
  • Study traces ecological collapse over 6,000 years of Egyptian history

    8 Sep 2014 | 12:29 pm
    Depictions of animals in ancient Egyptian artifacts have helped scientists assemble a detailed record of the large mammals that lived in the Nile Valley over the past 6,000 years. A new analysis of this record shows that species extinctions, probably caused by a drying climate and growing human population in the region, have made the ecosystem progressively less stable.
 
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    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek

  • The September edition of the Video News from TAC, online and on TV

    Rick Pettigrew
    15 Sep 2014 | 2:12 pm
    Friends and colleagues: The latest installment of the Video News from TAC features the following story: * Filmmaker Tashi Wangchuk followed Tsering Dorjee, exiled Tibetan folk artist, for about six months with a camera to make a film about displaced Tibetans in exile. This film is a real life story about Dorjee and his initiative in passing down centuries-old Tibetan literature and performing arts that are being erased inside Tibet to the Tibetan younger generation in the San Francisco Bay area. He does this through the community’s Sunday school and the school’s annual day event, which…
  • Calling all teachers and students!

    Rick Pettigrew
    5 Sep 2014 | 4:01 pm
    At ALI we are attempting to gain a better understanding of our audience and want to know how many of you are teachers or students! If you are a teacher or student and use TAC for educational purposes, please submit a comment below stating how and what you use TAC for! THANK YOU!
  • SCHAC, the South Central Historical Archeology Conference Announcement

    Anita Cohen-Williams
    4 Sep 2014 | 1:03 pm
    SCHAC, the South Central Historical Archeology Conference, will be held for the 16th time, in Memphis Tennessee 17-19 October, 2014. It will include a gathering on top of the conference hotel, the Comfort Inn Downtown, on Friday night 5-7p.m., papers at the Mississippi River Museum and Mud Island River Park nearby on Saturday, a BBQ dinner cruise on the Mississippi Saturday night, and a tour of the Ornamental Metal Museum and Civil War Fort Pickering in Memphis on Sunday morning. For more informationsee the SCHAC page on Facebook, or the SCHAC website atSCHAC website SCHAC includes the…
  • TAC's Find-It Challenge 08/26/2014

    Rick Pettigrew
    26 Aug 2014 | 3:20 pm
    The Archaeology Channel brings you a new weekly competition: The Find-It Challenge. Enter for your chance to win a TAC International Film and Video Festival Keychain! The first person to submit the most correct answers wins the prize. All answers and interactions must be gathered or performed on or within ALI’s website (www.archaeologychannel.org). To participate, simply read through the regulations so that you understand how the contest works and then start digging! For the complete list of Find-It regulations and guidelines, please visit [http://on.fb.me/1s69SrO]. Good luck and Happy…
  • New Member

    Leslie Patterson
    24 Aug 2014 | 7:24 pm
    Hello Everyone, I will keep this short an sweet. I am an Anthropology student. I am enrolled at USF in Tampa. I am also a single mother of two adult children. I am here mainly to learn so I doubt I will post much but I will read and learn I that I am able. Thanks for accepting me. 
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    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog

  • Dhammazedi Bell search proves fruitless

    noelbynature
    17 Sep 2014 | 6:54 am
    Rumours that a bell stolen from the Shwedagon Pagoda in the 16th century had been found proved to be just that – rumours. The salvage company has reportedly given up on the search, and public opinion has shifted to that of anger after donations were given to the ultimately fruitless cause. Source: Myanmar Times 20140830 Officials insist bell must return to pagoda Myanmar Times, 30 August 2014 Hope turns to anger as bell search ends Myanmar Times, 12 September 2014 The tide appears to be turning against those leading the expedition to raise the fabled Dhammazedi Bell. The team announced…
  • Now reporting ‘live’ from Bangkok

    noelbynature
    17 Sep 2014 | 5:57 am
    I’m finally back from my holiday and have also transitioned to a new country – greetings from Bangkok! I just started with the SEAMEO Regional Centre for Archaeology and Fine Arts (SEAMEO-SPAFA, check them out here). It’s a big move, from cool and dry Canberra to sunny and humid Bangkok, but one I am very happy to make. My role in SPAFA is to promote archaeology in Southeast Asia, and so there is much synergy between my professional role and my work with this website. As has been in my previous professional affiliations, I run SEAArch in a personal capacity and my personal…
  • Institute for Southeast Asian Archaeology Early Career Award

    noelbynature
    16 Sep 2014 | 12:40 am
    The Institute for Southeast Asian Archaeology has just set up an award for early career archaeologists for exceptional application of archaeological theory in Southeast Asian Archaeology. Awards are valued at USD$1,000. The deadline for nominations is 1 December 2015. Self nominations are encouraged. Institute of Southeast Asian Archaeology Who Is Eligible to Submit Nominations or Apply for Award: Nominations may be made by any professional archaeologist who holds a PhD. Self-nominations are strongly encouraged. Nomination/Submission Materials Required: Nomination letters should be submitted…
  • Excavations at Loc Giang

    noelbynature
    11 Sep 2014 | 10:19 pm
    Fredeliza Campos Piper The Australian National University The Lo Gach Archaeological Site in Southern Vietnam, Mar-April 2014 season. Related posts: Prei Khmeng excavations Archaeologists excavate skeleton at Long An Province A Hmong family in Son La province, Vietnam
  • Angkor Wat

    noelbynature
    11 Sep 2014 | 5:15 pm
    Tanachy Bruhns Northern Arizona University Shooting the back site at Angkor Wat I think it was done June 2012 Related posts: More news stories on the Angkor Wat Paintings More outrage over replica Angkor Wat Cambodia and Unesco agree to preserve Angkor Wat
 
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    Middle Savagery

  • Notes on Getting Your Whole Life Stolen

    Colleen Morgan
    17 Sep 2014 | 8:23 am
    “It’s Not the Same” by Jonathan on Flickr At the European Association for Archaeologists this year, our rented flat was broken into and a lot…a LOT of stuff was stolen, from me and the other archaeologists we were staying with. We’re still sorting everything out with the police, Airbnb, and insurance, but I thought I’d document a few things that I’ve learned. I had Prey and Find My Iphone installed on my Macbook pro, ipad and iphone. While I will install them again on my new equipment, they are not much good against savvy thieves. We actually were…
  • SHA 2015: Punk as Organizing Structure and Ethos for Emancipatory Archaeological Practice

    Colleen Morgan
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:05 am
    Tongue-in-cheek portrait of me by my oldest friend, Jesse Kulenski. He also designs the defcon t-shirts, check him out: https://www.facebook.com/designbyjesse I am very happy to participate in another conference I’ve never been to before–the SHA 2015 Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology, as part of a Punk Public Archaeology session organized by Christopher Matthews. John Lowe and I have been talking about punk and archaeology for a long time now, glad to have a chance to talk about some of those ideas. Title: Punk as Organizing Structure and Ethos for Emancipatory…
  • SAA 2015: A Session Honoring Ruth Tringham

    Colleen Morgan
    11 Sep 2014 | 11:23 pm
    I’m extremely pleased to announce the session that I have organized for the 80th meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, April 15-19, 2015: Lithics Cowgirl, Household Archaeologist, Digital Doyenne: A Session Dedicated to Ruth Tringham Throughout her incredibly active, extraordinarily creative career as an archaeologist, Ruth Tringham has transformed experimental lithic technology, re-animated “faceless blobs” with her Neolithic narratives, and explored digital technology in archaeology from punch cards to virtual worlds. With field projects at Selevac and…
  • Fossil Hunting with Paleontologists in Saltwick Bay

    Colleen Morgan
    3 Sep 2014 | 2:47 am
      About a month ago I got an email. Any archaeologists who were interested could tag along on a trip to Saltwick Bay on the northeast coast of England to hunt for fossils. The trip was arranged as part of the Symposium on Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy, an annual conference that was being held at King’s Manor this year.   Going fossil hunting with a bunch of paleontologists? Heck yeah! A month later I was neck-deep in deadlines, but decided to go anyway and do some writing on the bus. We scrambled along the shoreline and picked up a bunch of fossils. Dean…
  • Origins of Doha Re-Photography Featured on CNN

    Colleen Morgan
    2 Sep 2014 | 2:25 am
    I was happy to see that a mash-up that did a while ago for the Origins of Doha project was featured on the special Qatar Foundation section of CNN. The photo is near the Souq Waqif, and we located and re-shot the photograph using one of the few landmarks left in that area, a small minaret visible above and to the left of the men walking toward the camera. The black and white photograph comes from the Bibby and Glob expedition to Doha. I posted some of my initial attempts here: http://middlesavagery.wordpress.com/2013/01/02/rephotography-in-doha/…
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    Looting Matters

  • The identification of Ka Nefer Nefer

    David Gill
    17 Sep 2014 | 2:54 pm
    I have already reflected on the significance of 1999 for the collecting history of the Ka Nefer Nefer mask acquired by the St Louis Art Museum.It now appears that a member of the curatorial team at SLAM was informed about the Saqqara link by an Egyptologist at a major encyclopedic museum less than a year after its acquisition.This is correspondence that has not been mentioned in the discussion of the mask up to this point.During the subsequent few months Sidney Goldstein seems to have been made aware of Charly Mathez's claim to have seen the mask in Belgium, and in late September 1999…
  • Zakaria Goneim excavating in Egypt

    David Gill
    17 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    Here is some archive footage of Zakaria Goneim excavating in Egypt.
  • Zakaria Goneim at Saqqara

    David Gill
    16 Sep 2014 | 2:44 pm
    Zahi Hawass discusses the excavations at Saqqara by Zakaria Goneim.
  • The Ka Nefer Nefer Mask and 2005

    David Gill
    16 Sep 2014 | 2:07 pm
    Paul Barford has written about Michel van Rijn's public comments on the acquisition of the Ka Nefer Nefer mask by the St Louis Art Museum.I am grateful to a reader of LM for sending me the archived link to van Rijn's post. Although it is not dated (there is an update on 18 December 2005), the correspondence confirms a date in December 2005.Leaving aside style and presentation, what did van Rijn suggest and reveal?the mask had been removed from the store at Saqqarathe name of the person responsiblethe removal took place in the 1990sthe mask had been published by GoneimIn December 2005 this…
  • The Ka Nefer Nefer Mask and the Saqqara link

    David Gill
    15 Sep 2014 | 11:05 am
    In the spring of 1998 the St Louis Art Museum acquired the Ka Nefer Nefer mask that is now known to have been excavated at Saqqara. In late December 2005 a notice on the Museum Security Network drew attention to that association of find-spot. In January 2006 Brent R. Benjamin, the Director of SLAM, issued a memorandum in which he stated:The St Louis Post-Dispatch, the Riverfront Times, and the Art Newspaper have made inquiries regarding the provenance of the Museum’s Mummy Mask, acquired in 1998. These inquiries resulted from an allegation, posted on an internet website, that the mask was…
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    Theoretical Structural Archaeology

  • Dumbing down the past.

    Geoff Carter
    12 Sep 2014 | 5:14 pm
    Dumbing down through abstractionIn two previous posts, [ 1 + 2 ] I have demonstrated that one of the central images of British Prehistory, the Wessex Roundhouse, is a construct which does not accurately the evidence.  It is not a discovery, or rocket science, I just read the relevant reports and looked at the plans and sections. While I am happy to call these roundhouse constructs dumbing down, what to call the scholarship they generate presents a problem, since it represents the application of presumably perfectly acceptable theory to an imaginary data set. Archaeology is often at…
  • Parish Notices; Help Nigel Hetherington of Past Preservers do the EH Wall Hike

    Geoff Carter
    4 Sep 2014 | 11:52 am
    On  19 of September Nigel Hetherington of Past Preservers, will be returning to his ancestral homelands and taking part in the English Heritage's Hadrian's Wall Hike to raise funds for much needed conservation along the famous route. Please Donate today to support Nigel and English Heritage, and share with your friends and colleagues. All of your donations and efforts are greatly appreciated, please Tweet your support to @Pastpreservers and @EnglishHeritage using the #HadriansHike hashtag and please spread the word! Things are not…
  • Roundhouse Psychosis

    Geoff Carter
    30 Aug 2014 | 5:31 pm
    In the previous post I explained why the large Wessex style “roundhouse” as illustrated and rebuilt is a fiction which is not supported by the evidence.  To be fair to all concerned, it never was a “peer reviewed” idea, but like the artists reconstruction that decorate the front of some archaeological texts, it has a far greater impact on our collective perception of the past than any sterile rendition of the evidence.  The problem is that Roundhouses are more than just infotainment, a bit of harmless hokum for Joe Public, they are taken seriously, not only by those who…
  • Debunking the Iron Age Round House

    Geoff Carter
    17 Aug 2014 | 1:29 pm
    Is Prehistory is more or less bunk ?In 1916, when archaeology was in its infancy, the industrialist Henry Ford expressed the view that History is more or less bunk, so what he would have made of Prehistory would probably have been unprintable.[1]  However, perhaps as an engineer, his concerns were elsewhere, solving the problems in the present and helping to mould the future.In his remark, we might perceive a fundamental dichotomy of science v arts, but while this is clearly simplistic, there is a certain resonance for archaeology which sits, sometimes uncomfortably, between the…
  • On the Death of my Father

    Geoff Carter
    4 Aug 2014 | 1:28 pm
     Since April, following the death of my farther after a short illness, I have been unable to write further articles, in part because I have been unable to decide whether it was appropriate to note his passing in my blog.He was an engineer and academic, a successful and respected member of a community I have not been allowed to join; I would not want to sully his name, or associate him with the ideas that have brought me rejection and failure.The foregoing only serves to illustrate the problems I have with tone, and why I have struggled for months to find appropriate words and emotions.If…
 
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    The Archaeology News Network

  • New bog body discovered in Co. Meath

    16 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    A new, partially intact bog body has been discovered by Bord na Mona workers in Co Meath. Archaeologists from the National Museum of Ireland (NMI) have confirmed that it is working on a find of human remains in a bog near the border with Co Westmeath, at Rossan bog. Bog body remains of adult discovered last weekend at Rossan Bog, Meath  [Credit: National Museum Ireland]Archaeologist Maeve Sikora told the Irish Examiner that... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Researchers explore 'graveyard of ships' near San Francisco

    16 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    Federal researchers are exploring several underwater sites where ships sank while navigating in the treacherous waters west of San Francisco in the decades following the Gold Rush. In this Friday, Sept. 12, 2014 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric  Administration, an octopus swims by a mystery tugboat that was found by the NOAA  research vessel Fulmar off the California coast. Federal researchers are... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Long lost Roman fort discovered in Germany

    15 Sep 2014 | 8:00 am
    In the course of an educational dig in Gernsheim in the Hessian Ried, archaeologists from Frankfurt University have discovered a long lost Roman fort: A troop unit made up out of approximately 500 soldiers (known as a cohort) was stationed there between 70/80 and 110/120 AD. Over the past weeks, the archaeologists found two V-shaped ditches, typical of this type of fort, and the post holes of a wooden defensive tower as well as other... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Divers sure of new finds at Antikythera shipwreck

    15 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    Archaeologists set out Monday to use a revolutionary new deep sea diving suit to explore the ancient shipwreck where one of the most remarkable scientific objects of antiquity was found. A picture taken at the Archaeological Museum in Athens on September 14, 2014 shows  pieces of the so-called Antikythera Mechanism, a 2nd-century BC device known  as the world’s oldest computer, which was discovered by sponge divers in... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Massive 5,000 yr old stone structure found in Israel

    15 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    A lunar-crescent-shaped stone monument that dates back around 5,000 years has been identified in Israel. About 8 miles (13 kilometers) northwest of the Sea of Galilee, a newly identified  crescent-shaped monument was built about 5,000 years ago  [Credit: DigitalGlobe/Google Earth]Located about 8 miles (13 kilometers) northwest of the Sea of Galilee, the structure is massive — its volume is about 14,000 cubic meters (almost... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
 
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    The Mathisen Corollary

  • Jephthah's daughter

    David Warner Mathisen
    18 Sep 2014 | 12:37 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).In the Old Testament scriptures, in the Book of Judges, we encounter the horrifying story of Jephthah and his daughter. If ever there were a Biblical passage which renders an absolutely hideous message when taken literally, while yielding a completely satisfactory conclusion when understood astronomically, this story is it.In chapter 11 of Judges, after a description of the elders of Gildead requesting that Jephthah be made head and captain over the children of Israel, and a description of a series of battles between the children of Israel and the children of…
  • Graham Hancock identifies war on consciousness: TED confirms that he's right

    David Warner Mathisen
    17 Sep 2014 | 2:43 am
    Above is the now-infamous TEDx talk given by Graham Hancock in March of 2013 entitled "The War on Consciousness," in which he shared some incredibly personal aspects of his own life and shifts in his own consciousness, and then proceeded to raise absolutely vital questions regarding the nature of human consciousness, the longstanding antagonism in western culture towards visionary states, the possibility that privileging one type of consciousness over all others might be leading to very serious imbalances with tremendously negative ramifications for all humanity and the planet itself, and the…
  • Ambrose and Theodosius

    David Warner Mathisen
    15 Sep 2014 | 12:56 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).At the death of the Roman Emperor Theodosius I (AD 347 - 394), the formal panegyric was given by Ambrose, the Archbishop of Milan (AD 340 - 397), and amidst all the eulogy's praise of the departed emperor, Ambrose makes reference to the penitence of Theodosius, weaving this incident quite effortlessly and eloquently into a very beautiful metaphor within a larger theme of humanity's need for mercy and therefore the need to be merciful and forgiving to one another.The reference itself refers to an incident that took place in AD 390, in which citizens of the…
  • "The real world that is behind this one"

    David Warner Mathisen
    13 Sep 2014 | 2:57 am
    Whether or not they were deliberately intended to do so, movies and other forms of storytelling often portray concepts or imaginary scenarios which can serve as useful metaphors to illustrate or to convey an understanding of profound concepts, concepts which might be difficult to explain or even to grasp without using metaphors or allegories.It doesn't even really matter if the writers or moviemakers were originally intending to create a metaphor that can help to explain some deep truth about the nature of our universe and our place within it: we should actually expect that, if the universe…
  • The shamanic journey described in the Pyramid Texts

    David Warner Mathisen
    12 Sep 2014 | 1:29 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).The previous post, entitled "The Cobra Kai sucker-punch (and why we keep falling for it, over and over and over)," presented the argument that the ancient wisdom encoded in all the world's sacred mythologies taught that this universe contains both the apparently material and ordinary reality with which we are all familiar, and an unseen realm which is actually the "seed realm" from which the apparently material and ordinary reality is projected, much like a hologram is projected from the holographic film.Using an analogy from the original Karate Kid film…
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    Doug's Archaeology

  • Would an Independent Scotland Increase or Decrease Heritage and Archaeology Funding?

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    17 Sep 2014 | 4:11 pm
    On the issue of Scotland’s independence, the ‘Yes’  campaign says, “the roads will be paved with gold, which we will ride our unicorns on”, and the ‘No Thanks’ campaign says, “the devil will set up his new home in Scotland as it degrades into a failed state” when it comes to the future of economy and funding things like the NHS, pensions, and by default Heritage and Archaeology. Who is right? Let’s take a look. This is the third post on my series looking at what an independent Scotland would mean for Archaeology. The first showed that…
  • A Tale of Two Countries: Scottish Independence and the Archaeology workforce

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    16 Sep 2014 | 11:12 am
    A Tale of Two Countries I laid out how many aspects of Archaeology and Heritage will not change with an independent Scotland in my last post. But, there are many issues that an Independent Scotland would be dramatically different than the current UK and no more so that the future makeup of their workforce. An International, Diverse, and Highly Skilled Scotland Several years ago Scotland petitioned for the creation of a post-study work visa for students who attended Scottish Universities. If you received a degree from Scottish University you could stay on to work for 2 more years without…
  • What an Independent Scotland would mean for Archaeology and Heritage.

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    15 Sep 2014 | 11:24 am
    On September 18th the people of Scotland will vote on their independence from the United Kingdom, potentially becoming the oldest-newest independent nation in the world. Until last week the result of the referendum was predictable, the ‘Yes’ campaign (pro-independence) was heading for a shellacking. A few months ago some polls had the No Campaign, more correctly the ‘No Thanks’ (such a British thing to do, labeling it ‘no thanks’) group, ahead by 20 points i.e.  34% voting Yes and 54% voting no, with the rest undecided. If they had swung the ‘not…
  • Around the Archaeology Blog-o-sphere Digest #2

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    13 Sep 2014 | 11:13 am
    Here is the second round of the Archaeology Blog-0-sphere round-up. Basically, I am highlighting some of the other archeo-blogs out there but instead of focusing on the whole blog I am going to be collecting all their posts from the last week . I realise not everyone uses an RSS reader and some people might be interested in occasional posts from a blog and not follow them constantly. I also figure there is no better way to determine if you like a blog than by reading some of their work. I took these posts from my now updated list of archaeology blogs (400+ and counting). Though I have…
  • Discovering the Archaeologists of Europe 2014 – What it means to work in European Archaeology

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    10 Sep 2014 | 11:48 pm
    I am at the EAA conference in Istanbul. Today is a great session on the Disco Project (#letsdisco on twitter). It is a continental-wide project looking at the Archaeology working in Europe. Very interesting stuff on who, what, and where archaeologists are working, at least in Europe. It is being streamed live- (it is saved too, so if you do to the link a few days after this post you should still be able to watch it.). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0OYxLYuBic You can also read the reports here- http://www.discovering-archaeologists.eu/
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    Cultural Heritage Lawyer Rick St. Hilaire

  • Conservator's Records To Be Subpoenaed As Prosecutors Score Triple Victory in Peruvian Artifacts Forfeiture Cases

    16 Sep 2014 | 3:30 am
    Federal prosecutors recently scored three court victories in two forfeiture actions and one subpoena case involving allegedly contraband Peruvian artifacts.A federal magistrate in New Mexico recommended that a conservator, who may have handled contraband objects, turn over his business records to prosecutors under subpoena, a decision that certainly will attract attention among conservation professionals since they are rarely the subject of cultural property claims filed by the government.A federal judge in Miami, meanwhile, ruled that the two cases seeking to forfeit the Peruvian objects…
  • CPAC to Hold Hearing on El Salvador's MoU Extension Request

    14 Sep 2014 | 11:54 am
    The government of El Salvador has asked for an extension of its Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the United States.The MoU would authorize five more years of U.S. import controls under the Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act to protect jeopardized archaeological and ethnological heritage originating from the central American nation.The Cultural Property Advisory Committee (CPAC) will consider El Salvador's request during a public hearing that is scheduled for October 7 at 10:30 a.m. at 2200 C St. NW., Washington, DC (pictured here). To attend the hearing, call the…
  • Allegations of False Declarations and Altered Trade Papers: Forfeiture Complaint Says $250,000 Dinosaur Skull Isn't from France and Isn't a Cheap Replica

    8 Sep 2014 | 6:06 pm
    In a civil forfeiture complaint published today and filed last Friday, the U.S. Attorney’s office for the Eastern District of New York told a federal district court that a fossilized dinosaur skull over 65 million years old isn’t a cheap replica and isn’t from France.Prosecutors alleged in their complaint that a French fossil dealer attempted to unlawfully import the Alioramus dinosaur head into the United States by failing to disclose that it was real, that it originated from Mongolia, or that it was valued at a quarter million dollars.This latest case appears to be part of a…
  • A Healthy Trade, A Black Market Temptation: Latest Figures Show U.S. Leadership in Art and Antiquities Exports and Imports

    20 Aug 2014 | 8:21 am
    The latest trade figures show that the United States is the leading exporter and importer of fine art, antiquities, and other cultural goods. Dealers and consumers are thriving in this robust marketplace where billions of dollars are exchanged annually. Yet the market remains susceptible to criminal penetration.American international trade in fine art and antiquities is very large. UN Comtrade and U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) data reveal that America imported over $9 billion in art, collectors’ pieces, and antiques last year. It also exported the same…
  • Bagpipes Seizure by U.S. Customs May Spur Police Involvement in Ivory Ban Debate

    5 Aug 2014 | 10:14 am
    This week’s seizure by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of two teenagers’ vintage bagpipes may serve to increase public opposition against the current blanket ban on the movement and trade of ivory. This time among police officers.Pipes | Drums reported the confiscation of the teens’ heirloom bagpipes, writing that the 17 year olds from Massachusetts possessed CITES permits (permits under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) for the ivory that ornamented their 1936 and 1958 pipes. The pair crossed into Canada for a…
 
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    The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty

  • Béarnaise Awesome-Sauce

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:17 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Bonjour mes amis! Et bienvenue to episode 18 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty, “Béarnaise Awesome-Sauce!” You may have noticed that I’ve been gone for the last three weeks (yeah, sorry about that), well it’s because I’ve been in France! So I thought now that I’ve returned to my native soil I would tell you all about my travels and the fun and fascinating things I learned while exploring the beautiful land of baguettes, burgundy, and béarnaise sauce! This will be a two-part series because there’s…
  • Episode 17 “Great Odin’s Raven- it’s Archaeology 101!

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    5 Jul 2014 | 5:48 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Hi friends, welcome to Episode 17 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty Podcast “Great Odin’s Raven-it’s Archaeology 101!” In this fun filled episode we tackle some of the basics of excavation, with a focus on why archaeology and geology are old friends- and how this makes us better at what we do. It’s like taking that Archaeology 101 class you never got around to in college! (Unless you actually did take that class, then it’s more of a review of things you probably already know…sorry). In this new…
  • Episode 16 “Go West, Young (Wo)Man!”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    13 Jun 2014 | 2:26 am
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back friends! It’s another fantabulous episode of basically the best podcast that ever lived, “The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty!” So perhaps you noticed that I disappeared from the interwebs all of last week, that’s because I was working outside the reach of modern technology (and air conditioning). I had a fun week camping and surveying in the Zuni Mountains of New Mexico, which sounded like a pretty good topic for this week’s episode. We discuss the history of pioneering logging efforts in this area, as…
  • SAA Time 2014!

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    7 May 2014 | 6:32 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Tweet Hello friends! It's time for episode 15 of The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty "SAA Time 2014!" That's right, this is my reaction podcast to the Society for American Archaeology Conference in Austin, Texas. Pretty exciting stuff right?! Well, it's informative and entertaining at least (I hope!). This is a shorter episode because I have stuck only to topics falling under the banner of conferences, career advice, my fabu 4 days in Austin, and summer plans. I would definitely listen if you are a young archaeologist interested in figuring out the…
  • Episode 14 “Aloha State of Mind”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    5 Apr 2014 | 5:39 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Aloha friends, it’s time for another episode of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty! In honor of my recent trip to Hawaii I have decided to dedicate this episode to all things Aloha, and provide an interesting journey through the history of the 50th state- from it’s volcanic inception to the tragic day that will live in infamy. I had a great time on my vacation, but I also took it as an opportunity to learn more about Polynesian culture. Since I was staying with a friend who lives in Honolulu, it was interesting to get a local’s…
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    AntiquityNOW

  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! Almond Brittle with the Ancient Anise

    AntiquityNOW
    17 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    A small and unassuming looking herb, anise (also called aniseed) has been treasured by many different civilizations since antiquity. While it is related to several other well-known herbs such as cumin, fennel and dill, anise has made a special place … Continue reading →
  • National Anthems: Ancient Elements, Modern Resoundings

    AntiquityNOW
    16 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    Last Sunday, September 14th, was the 200th anniversary of the writing of the United States’ national anthem, The Star Spangled Banner.  Inspired by the raising of the American flag at Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland, which signified a major victory … Continue reading →
  • Looking for Natural Skin Care Tips? Ancient Chinese Empresses and Concubines Share Their Recipes

    AntiquityNOW
    11 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    UPDATE! This post was originally published on January 17, 2013. Skin care and that eternal search for youth are back in the news this month with a remedy that is both scandalous and ancient: blood. A new study has found that … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday: The Ancient Noodle

    AntiquityNOW
    10 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    Covered in creamy sauce, swimming in fragrant broth or simply sharing a bowl with some butter, noodles are the quintessential comfort food. Not surprisingly, many want to claim the noodle as their own. So many nations jockeying for position, longing … Continue reading →
  • Nature, Ecotherapy and a Peak into the Past Through National Parks

    AntiquityNOW
    9 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    When you first enter Crater Lake National Park, it’s easy to imagine you’ve stepped thousands of years into the past. Crater Lake in Oregon was created when Mount Mazama erupted close to 8,000 years ago, and ignoring the RVs visiting … Continue reading →
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    Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica

  • Audio News for September 7 to 13, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    15 Sep 2014 | 8:17 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: New sites in Spain show spread of early Copper Age (details) Shipwreck from the Franklin Expedition finally found (details) New Viking fortress discovered in Denmark (details) Siberian find is complete suit of bone armor (details)
  • Audio News for August 31 to September 6, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    8 Sep 2014 | 7:17 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Gibraltar cave may hold Neanderthal petroglyphs (details) Tiwanaku hallucinogens were a key part of shamanistic rituals (details) Permafrost erosion leads to collaboration between archaeologists and Yup’ik villagers (details) New finds in southwestern Mexico point to influential Olmec trading network (details)
  • Audio News for August 24 to 30, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    1 Sep 2014 | 6:24 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Dietary analysis shows ancient copper workers had higher status than once thought (details) Giant genetic study answers mystery of ancient Arctic extinction (details) Dry spots in the lawn turn into Stonehenge surprise (details) Neolithic oven in Croatia may be world’s oldest stove (details)
  • Audio News for August 17 to 23, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    25 Aug 2014 | 6:09 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Copper awl in northern Israel earliest evidence of Middle Eastern metalworking (details) New study shows different evidence of violence and peace for the Ancestral Puebloans (details) New archaeological evidence challenges the origins of Zoroastrianism (details) Cultural diversity for early modern humans occurred in Africa (details)
  • Audio News for August 10 to 16, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    18 Aug 2014 | 7:28 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Early Japanese tomb reveals unusual stepped pyramid construction (details) Interdisciplinary research rewrites history of early Egytian embalming (details) New Greek tomb may hold associate of Alexander the Great (details) New Maya finds include two entire cities buried by jungle (details)
 
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    MorgansLists.com

  • 5 Modern Reptiles That Give Birth To Live Young

    Morgans Lists
    17 Sep 2014 | 12:20 am
    Female Adder giving birth to live young.Ovoviviparous is the term used for reptiles that give birth to live young, which only represents about 20 percent of the modern scaled reptile population. Ovoviviparous species are similar to viviparous species, in that there is internal fertilization and the young are born live, but differ because the young are nourished by egg yolk as there is no placental connection in Ovoviviparous species. Most reptiles that give birth to live young are Ovoviviparous. Yet, there are some reptiles that do have placenta like structures capable of…
  • When Predators Become Prey - 4 Animals That Twist The Food Chain

    Morgans Lists
    10 Sep 2014 | 1:40 pm
    #1 Frog Devours SnakeNear Queensland, Australia Ian Hamiliton of Australia's Daily Mercury captured these photos of what several articles identify as a Cane Toad, but what may actually be a type of Tree Frog (Litoria), devouring a Brown Tree Snake or a Keelback snake, in a bizarre twist of the normal food chain. The non-venomous Brown Tree Snake usually feeds on birds and even amphibians, so it was a surprise and a treat for many interested parties. A veterinary surgeon interviewed in one newspaper commented, "We have seen snakes eating frogs here but not the other way around. We have…
  • 6 Organisms That Can Survive The Fallout From A Nuclear Explosion

    Morgans Lists
    29 Aug 2014 | 2:13 pm
    An animal's ability to survive the fallout from a nuclear explosion is usually dependent on its ability to withstand radiation, otherwise know as radioresistance. Radioresistant life forms or ionizing-radiation-resistant organisms (IRRO) are a group of organisms that require large doses of radiation, 1000 gray (Gy), to achieve a 90% reduction in their survival rate. To put it in perspective, a human would need anywhere between 4-10 (Gy) to achieve the same result and a dog could withstand even less, about 3.5 (Gy). Gray, with the symbol of (Gy), is a unit of measurement used to describe the…
  • 6 Organisms That Can Survive Travel In The Vacuum Of Space

    Morgans Lists
    27 Aug 2014 | 1:18 pm
    Panspermia is the theory that life spreads throughout the universe from planet to planet, and solar system to solar system. Distributed by meteoroids, asteroids, comets, and even through spacecraft via unintended contamination from alien contact. For example, during an Apollo mission to the moon there was a stowaway, the common bacteria Streptococcus mitis, took a walk on the moon with the astronauts and lived to return home and tell it's tale. In 1991, Apollo 12 Commander Pete Conrad commented on the significance of the only known microbial survivor of harsh interplanetary travel:"I always…
  • 8 Pieces of Crazy and Unconventional Performance Art

    Morgans Lists
    25 Aug 2014 | 10:08 am
    Performance art challenges accepted conventions and traditional forms of visual art such as painting and sculpture. Sometimes performance art focuses on the human body as it's canvas through movement, dance, or actions and activity not usually associated with art. It is normally presented live by the artist and their collaborators and sometimes with hired performers. Recently, performance art is becoming more and more unusual as the bounds of conventionality are stretched further and further to shock audiences and enable new artists to make a name for themselves. Here is 8 pieces of crazy and…
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    NOSAS Archaeology Blog

  • Belladrum Excavation, 31st August – 7th September 2014

    nosas
    15 Sep 2014 | 2:16 pm
    by Roland Spencer-Jones (NOSAS) The Belladrum drama has a Prologue and two Acts, three main protagonists, and a horde (sic) of extras. The Prologue: Enter first Joe Gibbs, landowner at Belladrum and host to the annual August Tartan Heart Festival. During clearing his fields after the Festival, he employs a metal detectorist to identify and get rid of all the left-behind tent pegs. Enter next that said detectorist, Eric Soane, who in August 2009 scanned the site and discovered a scatter of Roman denarii and some mediaeval coins. Enter third, Fraser Hunter, a principal Curator at the National…
  • Highland Hillforts

    nosas
    15 Sep 2014 | 1:54 pm
    by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS) The Atlas of Hillforts in Britain and Ireland project Hillforts are one of the most prominent types of prehistoric monument seen across many parts of Britain and Ireland, and this hillfort project has recently been set up with the aim of producing a paper atlas and an online searchable atlas linked to Google Earth. It is a collaborative four year project between the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh, and contributions from members of the public, either as individuals or as part of local field groups, are welcome. Several members of NOSAS were interested in…
  • Cromarty Medieval Burgh Dig July 12th to August 3rd 2014

    nosas
    11 Sep 2014 | 1:10 pm
    by Rosemary Jones (NOSAS) The 2013 dig had been great fun, so we offered our help for 2104. Bob was set to work, using a mattock, a draw hoe and a barrow, though not necessarily in that order. For me, the choice was a little harder: my back is troublesome, but I had been told to keep active, so I was asked to tidy up one of the uncovered 2013 trenches so that it could be photographed. Eventually Paul, the finds ‘cataloguer’, told me he didn’t want my offering of several fish bones, which was all I could find for the first few days. Michael joined me to uncover more…
  • Cnoc Tigh and Tarlogie Dun Excavations (Iron Age Round Houses)

    nosas
    11 Sep 2014 | 12:22 pm
    by David Findlay (NOSAS) These excavations, in April and July 2014, were led by Candy Hatherley and form part of the University of Aberdeen Northern Picts Project. Cnoc Tigh (see also our earlier blog entry) and Tarlogie Dun are Iron Age round houses situated on the north coast of the Tarbat Peninsula in Easter Ross. They are both on the high ground about 200m back from the coast giving them spectacular views across the Dornoch Firth to Sutherland and up the Sutherland coast. Neither site is naturally defensive and, though both have watercourses to one side creating a gorge and a…
  • A Visit to Kinloch Hourn

    nosas
    11 Sep 2014 | 10:43 am
    by Anne Coombs (NOSAS) The now the familiar road to Kinloch Hourn was a great introduction to the walk led by John Wombell on the 29th June. Henry Birkbeck has always been very generous to NOSAS and once again he offered us the use of the Lodge for the whole weekend. Please don’t get me wrong: the camp site by the riverside is perfectly acceptable but it was much more comfortable and midge free in the Lodge. What resulted was an extended long weekend which turned into a typical KLH event and my apologies to those who were unable to attend but you missed a very good time. The Lodge is…
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