Archaeology

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  • Brazil's Cultural Heritage

    Looting Matters
    David Gill
    27 Aug 2014 | 2:06 pm
    There is a report in Attractions Management about the pillaging of cultural property in Brazil ("Brazilian states fight back to protect cultural heritage from trafficking", August 26, 2014). There is a small exhibition to mark objects that have been recovered. But the scale of acknowledged theft is huge:Over the past 12 years, the Minas Gerais Office of the Public Prosecutor for Cultural Heritage and Tourism (CPPC) has recorded the loss of 700 objects of cultural value, though it estimates even more have been lost because most of the objects were never catalogued.It looks as if this is…
  • Prehistoric migrations: DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic

    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily
    28 Aug 2014 | 11:27 am
    A new DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic. We know people have lived in the New World Arctic for about 5,000 years. Archaeological evidence clearly shows that a variety of cultures survived the harsh climate in Alaska, Canada and Greenland for thousands of years. Despite this, there are several unanswered questions about these people.
  • Neolithic site discovered in central China

    Stone Pages Archaeo News
    2 Sep 2014 | 1:26 am
    Archaeologists in central China's Henan province have excavated a large neolithic settlement complete with moats and a cemetery. The Shanggangyang Site covers an area of 120,000 square metres, beside a...
  • Royal bronze chariot found after 3,000 years

    The Archaeology News Network
    1 Sep 2014 | 12:00 pm
    A bronze chariot made during the Western Zhou Dynasty (c. 11th century-771 BC) has been found in Qishan county, Shaanxi province - and archaeologists believe it may be a ceremonial vehicle used by princes. The wheel of the chariot is unearthed [Credit: Chinese Archaeology]"We found the chariot, which was buried 1.2 meters underground, in farmland at the village of Hejia," Zhang Yawei, director of the county's Zhouyuan Museum, told... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Evidence for earliest inhabitants of Central Great Plains

    Archaeology News from Past Horizons
    Past Horizons
    30 Aug 2014 | 2:19 am
    A team from the University of Kansas excavated a site in Pottawatomie County seeking to find artefacts tied to the Clovis and Pre-Clovis peoples
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    archaeology - Yahoo News Search Results

  • LECTURE: Recollections of Archaeology in Iran Lecture

    2 Sep 2014 | 8:12 am
    Wednesday 17 September in London: Against a background of the close cooperation that existed between all the archaeologists who were working in Iran in the 1960s and 1970s, this lecture attempts to describe the activities of various of the British archaeologists who were working in different parts of Iran at this time. Sites of Iron Age to Achaemenid date will be given particular attention.
  • Local's passion for the past creates a career

    2 Sep 2014 | 6:44 am
    COLDWATER — While some grow up with dreams of being a firefighter or a doctor, Kate Frederick wanted to be an archaeologist. “I just remember reading about (archaeology) as a kid and becoming very interested in reading more,” Frederick said.
  • Politicized archaeology

    2 Sep 2014 | 12:52 am
    Let us suppose that archaeologists discover that the tomb uncovered in Amphipolis was not the resting place of Roxana or Nearchos, but of Alexander the Great.
  • Remains of 18th century brewery found at Va. college

    1 Sep 2014 | 10:53 am
    WILLIAMSBURG, Va. — College students have always had a taste for beer, and archaeologists have uncovered new evidence at the College of William and Mary to prove it.
  • MU Museum of Art and Archaeology galleries delayed due to renovations

    28 Aug 2014 | 6:24 pm
    Alex Barker, director of the Museum of Art and Archaeology, said that the full galleries will open in early 2015 at the latest. The museums were moved in the spring because its homes, Pickard and Swallow halls, are being renovated. Read more
 
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    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine

  • Silk Relics Cleaned and Studied in Milan

    2 Sep 2014 | 2:30 pm
    BONN, GERMANY—Archaeologist Sabine Schrenk of the University of Bonn, and Cologne textile restorer Ulrike Reichert, are working together to clean silk tunics housed at the Basilica of Sant-Ambrogio in Milan. Most recently, the garments had been kept between heavy glass plates that contributed to their deterioration, and a careful cleaning is required to preserve them. The tunics are ascribed to St. Ambrose, a fourth century bishop of the emperor’s residence of Milan, who is honored as a doctor of the Christian church. According to Schrenk, the tunics have not been proven to date to the…
  • Are Marks in Gorham Cave Neanderthal Art?

    2 Sep 2014 | 2:00 pm
    GIBRALTAR—A team led by Clive Finlayson, director of the heritage division of the Gibraltar Museum, claims that etchings discovered on a table-like rock outcropping in Gorham’s Cave were scratched by Neanderthals more than 39,000 years ago. The marks, which were covered with sediments that contained stone tools typical of those made by Neanderthals between 30,000 and 39,000 years ago, are up to a few millimeters deep and cover an area about the size of a Frisbee. Testing revealed that carving the engravings would have taken purposeful, repeated motions with Neanderthal tools. “Is it…
  • Spain Returns Smuggled Artifacts to Colombia

    2 Sep 2014 | 1:30 pm
    MADRID, SPAIN—Colombia has received nearly 700 artifacts, including pre-Columbian pottery, funeral urns, ocarinas, necklaces, and stamps that were seized by Spanish police 11 years ago and placed in the Museum of America in Madrid, where they were cataloged and identified. The objects had been smuggled out of South America by a man accused of laundering money for the drug cartels. “We have repatriated a museum which was abroad and which returns to Colombia to strengthen the historic identity of the country,” Jorge Fernando Perdomo, Colombia’s deputy attorney general, told Hispanic…
  • UPDATE: Unusual Floor Uncovered in Amphipolis Tomb

    2 Sep 2014 | 1:00 pm
    AMPHIPOLIS, GREECE—Removal of loose sand from the antechamber directly behind the wall with two sphinxes at the tomb at Amphipolis has revealed a floor section made of irregular pieces of white marble on a red background. This room also has traces of a fresco with blue coloring on the wall behind the sphinxes. Archaeologists told The Greek Reporter that all three chambers of the unusual tomb had been filled with sand when the structure was sealed. They think that the inner walls may have been installed to hold back the sand, and that gaps in the walls may have been part of the sealing…
  • Rabbits Provide Window Into Animal Domestication

    29 Aug 2014 | 2:25 pm
    UPPSALA, SWEDEN—The relatively recent domestication of the rabbit some 1,400 years ago in France makes it an excellent model for the study of the domestication of animals and the development of agriculture. To begin, an international team of scientists sequenced the entire genome of one domestic rabbit as a reference genome assembly. Then they sequenced entire genomes of six different breeds of domestic rabbits, and wild rabbits from taken from different locations in the Iberian Peninsula and southern France. Science Daily reports that the team found domestication occurred, not through…
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    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Prehistoric migrations: DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic

    28 Aug 2014 | 11:27 am
    A new DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic. We know people have lived in the New World Arctic for about 5,000 years. Archaeological evidence clearly shows that a variety of cultures survived the harsh climate in Alaska, Canada and Greenland for thousands of years. Despite this, there are several unanswered questions about these people.
  • Bronze age wine cellar found: Wine residue, herbal additives found in palace cellar jars

    27 Aug 2014 | 11:15 am
    A Bronze Age palace excavation reveals an ancient wine cellar. Wine production, distribution, and consumption are thought to have played a role in the lives of those living in the Mediterranean and Near East during the Middle Bronze Age (1900-1600 BC), but little archaeological evidence about Bronze Age wine is available to support art and documentation about the role wine played during this period.
  • Walking fish reveal how our ancestors evolved onto land

    27 Aug 2014 | 10:15 am
    About 400 million years ago a group of fish began exploring land and evolved into tetrapods – today's amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. But just how these ancient fish used their fishy bodies and fins in a terrestrial environment and what evolutionary processes were at play remain scientific mysteries.
  • One of oldest metal objects found to date in Middle East

    21 Aug 2014 | 7:15 am
    A copper awl, one of the oldest metal objects found to date in the Middle East, has been discovered during the excavations at Tel Tsaf. The awl dates back to the late 6th millennium or the early 5th millennium BCE, moving back by several hundred years the date it was previously thought that the peoples of the region began to use metals.
  • Paleolithic diet may have included snails 10,000 years earlier than previously thought

    20 Aug 2014 | 1:46 pm
    Paleolithic inhabitants of modern-day Spain may have eaten snails 10,000 years earlier than their Mediterranean neighbors. Snails were widespread in the Late Pleistocene and Holocene, but it is still unknown when and how they were incorporated into human diets.
 
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    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek

  • TAC's Find-It Challenge 08/26/2014

    Rick Pettigrew
    26 Aug 2014 | 3:20 pm
    The Archaeology Channel brings you a new weekly competition: The Find-It Challenge. Enter for your chance to win a TAC International Film and Video Festival Keychain! The first person to submit the most correct answers wins the prize. All answers and interactions must be gathered or performed on or within ALI’s website (www.archaeologychannel.org). To participate, simply read through the regulations so that you understand how the contest works and then start digging! For the complete list of Find-It regulations and guidelines, please visit [http://on.fb.me/1s69SrO]. Good luck and Happy…
  • New Member

    Leslie Patterson
    24 Aug 2014 | 7:24 pm
    Hello Everyone, I will keep this short an sweet. I am an Anthropology student. I am enrolled at USF in Tampa. I am also a single mother of two adult children. I am here mainly to learn so I doubt I will post much but I will read and learn I that I am able. Thanks for accepting me. 
  • Week 2 of TAC's Find-It Challenge (8/18/14)!

    Rick Pettigrew
    18 Aug 2014 | 11:30 am
    After a successful first week, ALI brings you the second installment of its weekly Find-It Challenge. The first person to submit the most correct answers wins the prize. This week’s prize is a custom-made ALI Film Festival key chain. All answers and interactions must be gathered or performed on or within ALI’s website (www.archaeologychannel.org). To participate, simply read through the regulations so that you understand how the contest works and then start digging! For the complete list of Find-It regulations and guidelines, please visit [http://on.fb.me/1s69SrO].  Have fun and happy…
  • The August edition of the Video News from TAC, online and on TV

    Rick Pettigrew
    15 Aug 2014 | 4:51 pm
    Friends and colleagues: The latest installment of the Video News from TAC features the following stories: * Divers and snorkelers can tour six shipwrecks on the Maritime Heritage Trail in Biscayne National Park. The Erl King had three masts, but also a steam engine. She fatally ran aground in 1891. * Along the shore of the Sea of Cortez live the Comca’ac Indians of Mexico. Traditionally a hunting and gathering culture subsisting on the green sea turtle–or "Moosni"–the Comca’ac now are threatened by development and the turtles face possible extinction. However, the Moosni and the…
  • The July edition of the Video News from TAC, online and on TV

    Rick Pettigrew
    15 Jul 2014 | 9:30 am
    Friends and colleagues: The latest installment of the Video News from TAC features the following stories: * Chelsea Rose remembers excavating the house floor of Josiah Henson, whose autobiography inspired Uncle Tom’s Cabin, for the upcoming PBS season of Time Team America. * Divers and snorkelers can tour six shipwrecks on the Maritime Heritage Trail in Biscayne National Park. The Arratoon Apcar ran aground just below an unfinished lighthouse in 1878. * The Agnew Tramway in California’s Sierra Nevada was built in 1915 to service a series of high-elevation dams still operating as the Rush…
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    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog

  • Kbal Spean, Cambodia

    noelbynature
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:04 pm
    Veronica Walker Vadillo Oxford Centre for Maritime Archaeology This image depicts Vishnu Anantasayana (Vishnu reclining on the serpent Ananta floating on the ocean from where all things will be created), and it highlights the importance of being in the right place at the right time. I visited the site during the dry season and the water was no where near the image. A few months later, this is what I found: the water softly running beneath Ananta, transforming the serpent into a boat through the incorporation of natural elements. Related posts: Cambodia to ban smoking in Angkor…
  • Hapao Rice Terraces

    noelbynature
    1 Sep 2014 | 10:58 pm
    Ellen Hsieh Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, UCLA Mountain, Terrace, and the Site, Hapao, the Philippines Related posts: Ifugao rice terraces no longer endangered Negritos or Malays: Who are the original inhabitants of the Philippines? History Lost in Cagayan de Oro
  • Gunungmegang Statue; Man and Elephant

    noelbynature
    1 Sep 2014 | 5:52 pm
    Harry Octavianus Sofian Balai Arkeologi Palembang – Departemen Pendidikan Dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia Gunungmegang statue is one of the site from Pasemah Megalithic Culture, located at the foot of the Mountain Dempo, Lahat Distric, South Sumatera Province – Indonesia. Pasemah megalithic culture is very unic, because the representation from the statue not stiff, but show dynamic activity,like Gunungmegang statue, show man holding the trunk of the elephant. This statue show us how the ancient people do domestication of wild elephants? Related posts: Video: Short documentary on…
  • Man Bac, Vietnam

    noelbynature
    31 Aug 2014 | 10:49 pm
    Damien Huffer Smithsonian Institution, Museum Conservation Institute and Dept. of Physical Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History Man Bac excavation in the landscape, 2007 season, Ninh Binh Province, Vietnam Related posts: 2,500-year-old artefacts found in Southern Vietnam Ancient citadel found in Southern Vietnam More Vietnamese coins in the news
  • The “Splatt” Theory

    noelbynature
    31 Aug 2014 | 5:41 pm
    Ardeth Anderson Institute for Southeast Asian Archaeology The “Splatt” Theory: an artist’s conception of how the archaeological site of Ban Chiang, Thailand, was formed. Gouache painting by Ardeth Anderson, 1995 Related posts: Research centre to open in Ban Chiang The cradle of the Southeast Asian Bronze Age Museum director indicted looted antiquities scandal
 
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    Middle Savagery

  • Origins of Doha Re-Photography Featured on CNN

    Colleen Morgan
    2 Sep 2014 | 2:25 am
    I was happy to see that a mash-up that did a while ago for the Origins of Doha project was featured on the special Qatar Foundation section of CNN. The photo is near the Souq Waqif, and we located and re-shot the photograph using one of the few landmarks left in that area, a small minaret visible above and to the left of the men walking toward the camera. The black and white photograph comes from the Bibby and Glob expedition to Doha. I posted some of my initial attempts here: http://middlesavagery.wordpress.com/2013/01/02/rephotography-in-doha/…
  • From the Morning

    Colleen Morgan
    30 Aug 2014 | 10:14 am
    I really should be writing something else. I really should be writing at least a half-dozen other things, all looming, lurking, people expecting. When I was a little girl, my parents had a record player, which is not unusual. I remember laying on my little round stomach, using a record as something hard beneath my paper to color on. I’d draw and draw, on white paper, on newspaper, on anything. But the records peeked out from behind the paper, and I remember a few vividly: The Beach Boys, Endless Summer. It was a gatefold, so it was thick and had mysterious images inside. It also had…
  • EAA Istanbul: A Blast from the (Çatalhöyük) Past

    Colleen Morgan
    12 Aug 2014 | 2:52 am
    Tea on the Ferry across the Bosphorus, taken in 2006 (!) For the first time ever, I’m attending the European Association for Archaeology (EAA) meetings, 10-14 September in Istanbul. Istanbul is probably my favorite city in the world, so full of chaos and color, heady intellectualism, romanticism and a past that stretches deep beneath the Bosphorus. I don’t think my Turkophilia sits all that well with my Turkish friends, who have to struggle with the conservatism of Erdoğan’s government and have to fight in the streets to protect themselves from his police state. I worry…
  • Gesture & Clay: Sunday Ceramics

    Colleen Morgan
    3 Aug 2014 | 2:16 am
    These are two very different videos about crafting ceramics, yet they both capture the motion of highly-trained hands and the beauty of making. The first video shows fine art pottery from Icheon, Korea–made on a potter’s wheel, all by men. The technique and attention to detail is astonishing, as they cut, pat, stamp, coax, and dab glaze into clay. The second is from the British Museum, a collaborative ethnoarchaeological project conducted in Kerala, India. These potters are women, and the ceramics they make are standardized pots, each performing a specific role in the shaping of…
  • Faces of Archaeology Published in Archaeologies

    Colleen Morgan
    30 Jul 2014 | 4:15 am
      The Faces of Archaeology portrait project that Jesse Stephen and I did at WAC-7 has been published by Archaeologies! It was a fantastic chance to collaborate with a gifted photographer and I’m very pleased with the project, the exhibitions at TAG Chicago and Turkey TAG and the final publication. From our conclusions: Ultimately, the Faces of Archaeology project reveals the complexity of representation in archaeology and world heritage practice. While making individual participation in WAC-7 visible through capturing and disseminating portraits of attendees, the authors contended…
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    Looting Matters

  • Goldstein, Geneva, and the Mummy Mask

    David Gill
    2 Sep 2014 | 12:09 pm
    Mummy mask excavated at SaqqaraIt is known that Sidney Goldstein, the Associate Director of the St Louis Art Museum (SLAM) as well as the curator of Ancient Art, wrote a letter to Dr Mohammed Saleh, then director of the Cairo Museum, prior to the acquisition of the Egyptian mummy mask—known to have been excavated at Saqqara—by the museum in March 1998. The letter does not appear to have been released by SLAM, but a copy was made available to Malcolm Gay for his key article in February 2006. As the veracity of this letter has never been challenged we must assume its…
  • Brazil's Cultural Heritage

    David Gill
    27 Aug 2014 | 2:06 pm
    There is a report in Attractions Management about the pillaging of cultural property in Brazil ("Brazilian states fight back to protect cultural heritage from trafficking", August 26, 2014). There is a small exhibition to mark objects that have been recovered. But the scale of acknowledged theft is huge:Over the past 12 years, the Minas Gerais Office of the Public Prosecutor for Cultural Heritage and Tourism (CPPC) has recorded the loss of 700 objects of cultural value, though it estimates even more have been lost because most of the objects were never catalogued.It looks as if this is…
  • Was Kaloterna 'disappeared'?

    David Gill
    21 Aug 2014 | 3:46 am
    Egyptian mummy mask excavated at SaqqaraPaul Barford has written on the Kaloterna collection that once (allegedly) possessed the Egyptian mummy mask discovered at Saqqara and for the time being in the St Louis Art Museum (SLAM). He raises an uncomfortable possibility for the curatorial team at SLAM:One might quite legitimately ask, whether there is a possibility that Kaloterna was 'disappeared' by the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia's State Security Apparatus for political reasons.I am sure that SLAM officials would not wish to be seen to have gained an object that could have been…
  • Is the Kaloterna collection fictional?

    David Gill
    19 Aug 2014 | 2:35 pm
    Egyptian mummy mask reported to have formed part of "the Kaloterna collection"Just over a month ago I raised some questions about the Kaloterna collection. Nobody has pointed me in the direction of other objects from this collection. Could this collection be fictional?What is the authenticated evidence that Zuzi Jelinek acquired this mask from the Kaloterna collection? Did this take place in the early 1960s? Where was Jelinek living when the acquisition was made? Does Jelinek have any (up to now overlooked) record among her papers?If the Kaloterna collection did not exist, where does it leave…
  • Visual Heritage Project

    David Gill
    19 Aug 2014 | 10:46 am
    Apsara Iyer has been researching the formation and persistence of antiquities trafficking markets in Peru and India. Iyer has now launched the Visual Heritage Project.The site aims to crowd sources images for archaeological sites from Instagram or Flickr and pairs these photos with older archival images. The goal is to create a visual record of archaeological sites that allows viewers to see how a location has changed over time and can be consulted in cases of looting, automatically updating to incorporate up-to-date photography via public social media posts. Right now, the crucial step is…
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    Theoretical Structural Archaeology

  • Roundhouse Psychosis

    Geoff Carter
    30 Aug 2014 | 5:31 pm
    In the previous post I explained why the large Wessex style “roundhouse” as illustrated and rebuilt is a fiction which is not supported by the evidence.  To be fair to all concerned, it never was a “peer reviewed” idea, but like the artists reconstruction that decorate the front of some archaeological texts, it has a far greater impact on our collective perception of the past than any sterile rendition of the evidence.  The problem is that Roundhouses are more than just infotainment, a bit of harmless hokum for Joe Public, they are taken seriously, not only by those who…
  • Debunking the Iron Age Round House

    Geoff Carter
    17 Aug 2014 | 1:29 pm
    Is Prehistory is more or less bunk ?In 1916, when archaeology was in its infancy, the industrialist Henry Ford expressed the view that History is more or less bunk, so what he would have made of Prehistory would probably have been unprintable.[1]  However, perhaps as an engineer, his concerns were elsewhere, solving the problems in the present and helping to mould the future.In his remark, we might perceive a fundamental dichotomy of science v arts, but while this is clearly simplistic, there is a certain resonance for archaeology which sits, sometimes uncomfortably, between the…
  • On the Death of my Father

    Geoff Carter
    4 Aug 2014 | 1:28 pm
     Since April, following the death of my farther after a short illness, I have been unable to write further articles, in part because I have been unable to decide whether it was appropriate to note his passing in my blog.He was an engineer and academic, a successful and respected member of a community I have not been allowed to join; I would not want to sully his name, or associate him with the ideas that have brought me rejection and failure.The foregoing only serves to illustrate the problems I have with tone, and why I have struggled for months to find appropriate words and emotions.If…
  • #BlogArch – Where is it all leading?

    Geoff Carter
    27 Mar 2014 | 9:08 pm
    Over at Doug’s Archaeology Blog the final question for next month’s #blogarch SAA session on blogging is where are you going with blogging or would you it like to go? While having spent half my lifetime working on this methodology, I have always had an end in mind, but what I have deduced from this research was utterly unexpected. The ideal end product was always envisaged as a 3D CAD model, and the internet is now the obvious place to present one. But, to cut to the chase, the core of the issue is Peer Review; While it is technically possible to publish a 3D presentation on the…
  • Ramparts and Ditches - the Roman Killing Zone

    Geoff Carter
    5 Feb 2014 | 12:51 am
     Recognizing the Timber Wall and Ditch, predating the more familiar Hadrian’s Wall, highlighted central importance of timber engineering to the Roman army in the field and took this research in an unexpected direction.While many Roman military installations are identified by their bank and ditch, as archaeological remains they are often somewhat underwhelming, certainly compared with some hill forts, but history attests to their success in withstanding assault.  The tactics behind these structures can be explored by using a simple SketchUp model of the sort of rampart and ditch…
 
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    Stone Pages Archaeo News

  • Neolithic site discovered in central China

    2 Sep 2014 | 1:26 am
    Archaeologists in central China's Henan province have excavated a large neolithic settlement complete with moats and a cemetery. The Shanggangyang Site covers an area of 120,000 square metres, beside a...
  • Genetic prehistory of the New World Arctic peoples

    2 Sep 2014 | 1:25 am
    Many studies and discoveries focus on searching for the first Americans. Less popular but equally important has been research into how and when the Arctic was settled - the last...
  • Finds from Avebury's West Kennet Avenue

    2 Sep 2014 | 1:24 am
    Archaeology students mostly from Southampton and Leicester universities have re-opened one trench from last year's dig, plus another major area of investigation, moving tons of turf and soil to reach...
  • Stonehenge 'complete circle' evidence found

    30 Aug 2014 | 7:44 am
    Evidence that the outer stone circle at Stonehenge was once complete has been found - parch marks in the grass, in an area that had not been watered, have revealed...
  • Famous Utah rock art may be much recent than was thought

    30 Aug 2014 | 7:43 am
    Since the original Barrier Canyon rock art panel, known as the Great Gallery, was first discovered by scientists in Utah's Canyonlands National Park (USA), experts have debated how old the...
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    The Archaeology News Network

  • Marble mosaic floor revealed at Amphipolis tomb

    1 Sep 2014 | 1:30 pm
    Excavation work at the site of Ancient Amphipolis, in central Macedonia, has revealed a mosaic of random while marble pieces against a red background, the Ministry of Culture has said. The floor section made of irregular pieces of white marble on red background is in  excellent condition and is located in the antechamber behind the wall with the two sphinxes  [Credit: Greek Ministry of Culture]The mosaic, part of the... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Study claims cave art made by Neanderthals

    1 Sep 2014 | 1:00 pm
    A series of lines scratched into rock in a cave near the southwestern tip of Europe could be proof that Neanderthals were more intelligent and creative than previously thought. Neanderthal rock engraving at Gorham’s Cave in Gibraltar. The series of lines scratched  into the rock could be proof that Neanderthals were more intelligent and creative  than previously thought [Credit: Stuart Finlayson]The cross-hatched engravings... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Royal bronze chariot found after 3,000 years

    1 Sep 2014 | 12:00 pm
    A bronze chariot made during the Western Zhou Dynasty (c. 11th century-771 BC) has been found in Qishan county, Shaanxi province - and archaeologists believe it may be a ceremonial vehicle used by princes. The wheel of the chariot is unearthed [Credit: Chinese Archaeology]"We found the chariot, which was buried 1.2 meters underground, in farmland at the village of Hejia," Zhang Yawei, director of the county's Zhouyuan Museum, told... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Stonehenge 'complete circle' evidence found

    1 Sep 2014 | 11:00 am
    One of the many mysteries of Stonehenge may have been solved, not because of a scientific breakthrough or painstaking research, but after a maintenance team's hosepipe turned out to be a little short. An orthophoto of Stonehenge taken from the air shows the brown patches of grass where  stones may once have completed the circle [Credit: English Heritage/Damian Grady]Archaeologists have long argued over whether the ancient... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • 8,000 year old footprints discovered in Bursa

    1 Sep 2014 | 10:00 am
    Footprints dating back to the Neolithic period (6,400 B.C.) have been discovered during excavations in Barçın tumulus in the northwestern province of Bursa’s Yenişehir district. According to archaelogists, the oldest settlement in the region  dated back to 8,600 BC [Credit: AA]Koç University academic, Rana Özbal, said works had been continuing in Barçın tumulus since 2007 under the coordination of the Culture and Tourism Ministry... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
 
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    The Mathisen Corollary

  • Welcome to new visitors from The Higherside Chats!

    David Warner Mathisen
    2 Sep 2014 | 3:34 am
    Welcome to new visitors (and returning friends) from THC! I recently had the opportunity to appear as a guest on Greg Carlwood's The Higherside Chats, and it was a real pleasure to hang out with Greg and be on a show that I've come to really enjoy since first learning about it at the Secret Space Program in San Mateo this past June.I really appreciate Greg's style and the knowledge and preparation he brings to each interview. Greg's funny, he's positive, and he seems like someone who'd be fun to hang around with or go surfing with in San Diego. Plus he's created a great platform for…
  • Outlaw drums: evidence of the suppression of the shamanic worldview

    David Warner Mathisen
    2 Sep 2014 | 12:07 am
    image: Replica on display of a Saami rune drum, confiscated by government agents in 1691. Wikimedia commons (link).The previous post presented the argument that the shamanic worldview is an integral part of the shared history of all humanity, but that this worldview has been deliberately stolen and suppressed, beginning at a specific time and place in Western Europe and that the suppression spread from there.For the purposes of the discussion, this concept of the "shamanic worldview" can be broadly defined (as it was in that previous post) as:the awareness of an Other Realm (sometimes…
  • Humanity's shared shamanic heritage

    David Warner Mathisen
    1 Sep 2014 | 3:21 pm
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).When considering the subject of shamanism and shamanic experience, many "Westerners" (that is to say, those who have grown up in the parts of the world that were actually ruled by the Roman Empire, specifically the western empire, as well as those parts of the world that the later European states descended from the western empire influenced heavily, and in particular those areas which were deeply committed to literalist forms of Christianity for many centuries in a row) may find the subject to be uncomfortable or even threatening.This discomfort may be due to a…
  • The name of the Ankh, continued: Kundalini around the world

    David Warner Mathisen
    31 Aug 2014 | 2:37 pm
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).The foregoing series of posts has been exploring the evidence which suggests that the concept of "raising the Djed" is absolutely central to the ancient wisdom which was apparently given to humanity from some pre-historic source and which manifests itself in the world's sacred scriptures and traditions, from the earliest "historical" civilizations of Egypt and Sumer and Vedic India, ancient China, and around the globe to the lands of the Norse, the Americas, Africa, Australia, the islands of the Pacific, and the vast lands of Asia.We have seen evidence that the…
  • The shamanic foundation of the world's ancient wisdom

    David Warner Mathisen
    29 Aug 2014 | 11:39 pm
    image: Wikimedia commons (linkThe previous post on "The sacrifice of Odin" presented abundant evidence that the important Norse god Odin is a shamanic figure, frequently depicted as undertaking journeys in search of hidden knowledge, and knowledge which specifically can only be obtained through shamanic methods. The most central and most shamanic of all of these vision-quest journeys undertaken by Odin is undoubtedly his ascent to hang himself upon Yggdrasil, sacrificing in his own words "myself to myself," wounded with "the spear" which we can assume would likely mean deliberately and…
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    Doug's Archaeology

  • Go With a Publisher or DIY? Archaeology Publishing

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    2 Sep 2014 | 3:05 pm
    The world of publishing has changed dramatically in the last few years. E-books and E-readers are now a thing. Open Access is dominating the discussion in journal publishing. Big chain bookstores are going out of business like it is the cool thing to do. Now, anyone with a computer and an Internet connection has all of the tools available to them that a big name publishers does. This leads people to ponder,  ‘if I can do everything myself than why do I need a publisher? Why not do DIY (do it yourself) publishing?’ Not so fast It is true we have the all the tools to publish but…
  • $7100 for a Archaeology Book! The Economics of Archaeology Publishing

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    1 Sep 2014 | 12:34 pm
    In the last few months I have fielded some questions from Tracy at Archaeology in Tennessee and Maria at Sprache der Dinge about publishing in archaeology. Unfortunately, I don’t think I did their questions justice with my short emails. So I am going to spend this week’s blog posts on publishing in archaeology, including DIY publishing digital books. First up the $7200 book. How Book Publishing Works While I would love to include journals in this series that is just going to be too much to cover and will have to wait for another series. I am going to discuss monographs a.k.a…
  • Internet Archaeology is going Open Access and you can win a prize- #iaopen

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    27 Aug 2014 | 6:44 am
    Internet Archaeology was the first Open Access Archaeology journal when it was launched back in 1996. It then took a brief detour into paywall publishing to pay the bills. But, now it is heading back to being Open Access i.e. free to read. In celebration of this fact Judith is having a neat little contest on Twitter. Create a tagline for this momentous occasion and win this prize: In anticipation of IA's switch to open access #iaopen, create a new tagline for us & win one of our fab USB trowels! http://t.co/DrA6b17GHG— Internet Archaeology (@IntarchEditor) August 26, 2014…
  • Scotland’s Community Heritage Conference

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    26 Aug 2014 | 4:01 am
    I have updated these videos for Scotland’s Community Heritage Conference. I had originally posted this on November 14th, 2013 but has since gotten better software and more experience.  So I digitally remastered the videos (makes me sound like a movie studio). It should be a more enjoyable viewing experience. As part of the conference there was an excellent mural created for the conference by Alex at the Royal Commission. It is used as the intro slide to the videos so do check it out. Here are the talks (in HD) in the order they were given in:
  • Pitching Your Archaeology News to the Press: Archaeology and the Press- Part 5

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    22 Aug 2014 | 10:26 am
    This week I have talked about crafting a ‘newsworthy’ story and about how to get it published via a press release. But, the process is not exactly as simple as uploading a press release into an email and clicking the ‘send’ button. I am going to spend this last post in the series discussing how to increase your chances of getting into the news, beyond just making a good press release. Location, Location, Location There are three types of location specific news agencies- local/regional, national, and international. Knowing what stories they likely will publish will save…
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    Cultural Heritage Lawyer Rick St. Hilaire

  • A Healthy Trade, A Black Market Temptation: Latest Figures Show U.S. Leadership in Art and Antiquities Exports and Imports

    20 Aug 2014 | 8:21 am
    The latest trade figures show that the United States is the leading exporter and importer of fine art, antiquities, and other cultural goods. Dealers and consumers are thriving in this robust marketplace where billions of dollars are exchanged annually. Yet the market remains susceptible to criminal penetration.American international trade in fine art and antiquities is very large. UN Comtrade and U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) data reveal that America imported over $9 billion in art, collectors’ pieces, and antiques last year. It also exported the same…
  • Bagpipes Seizure by U.S. Customs May Spur Police Involvement in Ivory Ban Debate

    5 Aug 2014 | 10:14 am
    This week’s seizure by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of two teenagers’ vintage bagpipes may serve to increase public opposition against the current blanket ban on the movement and trade of ivory. This time among police officers.Pipes | Drums reported the confiscation of the teens’ heirloom bagpipes, writing that the 17 year olds from Massachusetts possessed CITES permits (permits under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) for the ivory that ornamented their 1936 and 1958 pipes. The pair crossed into Canada for a…
  • Assyria to Iberia Exhibition Highlights Legal and Public Policy Issues Surrounding Foreign Lending

    31 Jul 2014 | 10:21 am
    The ancient Assyrian Empire and Phoenician city-states fascinate museum-goers. But when visitors view Assyria to Iberia at the Dawn of the Classical Agein New York starting this September, few will be aware of the many legal and public policy issues that surround the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition. Two are worth highlighting.On the legal front, the museum has secured immunity from judicial seizure of the foreign objects on temporary loan that are expected to be displayed. Given that the Met billsthe showing as a landmark exhibition” that will present“some 260 works of…
  • UPDATED > Calling Attention to the Destruction of Heritage in Iraq

    24 Jul 2014 | 1:39 pm
    Greed often motivates cultural heritage trafficking. The illegal looting, smuggling, laundering, and sale of heritage objects is typically undertaken to earn cash. But a far more insidious crime is cultural heritage assault, which targets the identity of a community by attempting to obliterate its history and culture.Cultural heritage assault takes the form of politically or religiously motivated iconoclasm, theft, and vandalism. Its purpose is to cause psychological distress or to incite racial, ethnic, or religious hatred. Assaults on heritage target monuments, art, religious institutions,…
  • Another Due Diligence Lesson as Becchina Archives Produce U.S. Court Forfeiture of Antiquities from Italy

    23 Jul 2014 | 8:31 am
    Yesterday’s order of forfeiture in the case of United States v. One Attic Red-Figure Skyphos and One Apulian Red-Figure Bell Krater provides another example of why dealers and collectors must exercise stringent due diligence when acquiring antiquities.The case involved the seizure and forfeiture of the two archaeological objects that were alleged to have been the fruits of the Gianfranco Becchina antiquities trafficking ring. The forfeiture order issued by the federal district court in northern New York resulted from a stipulation between American and Italian authorities to turn over the…
 
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    The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty

  • Béarnaise Awesome-Sauce

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:17 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Bonjour mes amis! Et bienvenue to episode 18 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty, “Béarnaise Awesome-Sauce!” You may have noticed that I’ve been gone for the last three weeks (yeah, sorry about that), well it’s because I’ve been in France! So I thought now that I’ve returned to my native soil I would tell you all about my travels and the fun and fascinating things I learned while exploring the beautiful land of baguettes, burgundy, and béarnaise sauce! This will be a two-part series because there’s…
  • Episode 17 “Great Odin’s Raven- it’s Archaeology 101!

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    5 Jul 2014 | 5:48 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Hi friends, welcome to Episode 17 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty Podcast “Great Odin’s Raven-it’s Archaeology 101!” In this fun filled episode we tackle some of the basics of excavation, with a focus on why archaeology and geology are old friends- and how this makes us better at what we do. It’s like taking that Archaeology 101 class you never got around to in college! (Unless you actually did take that class, then it’s more of a review of things you probably already know…sorry). In this new…
  • Episode 16 “Go West, Young (Wo)Man!”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    13 Jun 2014 | 2:26 am
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back friends! It’s another fantabulous episode of basically the best podcast that ever lived, “The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty!” So perhaps you noticed that I disappeared from the interwebs all of last week, that’s because I was working outside the reach of modern technology (and air conditioning). I had a fun week camping and surveying in the Zuni Mountains of New Mexico, which sounded like a pretty good topic for this week’s episode. We discuss the history of pioneering logging efforts in this area, as…
  • SAA Time 2014!

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    7 May 2014 | 6:32 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Tweet Hello friends! It's time for episode 15 of The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty "SAA Time 2014!" That's right, this is my reaction podcast to the Society for American Archaeology Conference in Austin, Texas. Pretty exciting stuff right?! Well, it's informative and entertaining at least (I hope!). This is a shorter episode because I have stuck only to topics falling under the banner of conferences, career advice, my fabu 4 days in Austin, and summer plans. I would definitely listen if you are a young archaeologist interested in figuring out the…
  • Episode 14 “Aloha State of Mind”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    5 Apr 2014 | 5:39 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Aloha friends, it’s time for another episode of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty! In honor of my recent trip to Hawaii I have decided to dedicate this episode to all things Aloha, and provide an interesting journey through the history of the 50th state- from it’s volcanic inception to the tragic day that will live in infamy. I had a great time on my vacation, but I also took it as an opportunity to learn more about Polynesian culture. Since I was staying with a friend who lives in Honolulu, it was interesting to get a local’s…
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    AntiquityNOW

  • Kids’ Blog! Chinese Kites Soar Throughout History

    AntiquityNOW
    2 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    Did you know that kites were invented 2,300 years ago?  A Chinese philosopher, Mo Di, who lived from 468-376 BCE, designed the very first kite in the shape of an eagle.[1]  It was not made out of paper, because paper … Continue reading →
  • Ancient Dentistry Part 1: Drills, Gemstones and Toothpaste!

    AntiquityNOW
    28 Aug 2014 | 2:00 am
    We all cringe at the thought of going to the dentist — and that’s with the comfortable recliners, the soothing music, the anesthetics and analgesics. Imagine what a visit to the dentist must have been like thousands of years ago. … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! Watermelon and Feta Salad: Celebrate an Ancient Summer Fruit

    AntiquityNOW
    27 Aug 2014 | 2:00 am
    As summer in the northern hemisphere takes its final breaths, we’re all trying to cling to those sun-kissed moments and never-ending days that are filled with family, food and fun. AntiquityNOW wants to help you hold on a bit longer … Continue reading →
  • Call for Entries for 2015 LegacyQuest International Film and Video Festival for Tweens

    AntiquityNOW
    26 Aug 2014 | 2:00 am
    Letter of Intent Deadline- December 12, 2014 Final Entry Submission Deadline- February 27, 2015 View our invitational video below and scroll down for details about the festival and how your students can get involved! AntiquityNOW (AN) and Archaeological Legacy Institute … Continue reading →
  • KIDS’ BLOG! Rain, Rain Go Away: Ancient Weather, Modern Predictions

    AntiquityNOW
    21 Aug 2014 | 2:00 am
    Update! This post was originally published on June 25, 2013. Hurricane season 2014 has been pretty quiet so far, but you never know when a tiny little storm system can gain momentum and become a full-fledged hurricane. Ancient civilizations had … Continue reading →
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    Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica

  • Audio News for August 24 to 30, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    1 Sep 2014 | 6:24 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Dietary analysis shows ancient copper workers had higher status than once thought (details) Giant genetic study answers mystery of ancient Arctic extinction (details) Dry spots in the lawn turn into Stonehenge surprise (details) Neolithic oven in Croatia may be world’s oldest stove (details)
  • Audio News for August 17 to 23, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    25 Aug 2014 | 6:09 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Copper awl in northern Israel earliest evidence of Middle Eastern metalworking (details) New study shows different evidence of violence and peace for the Ancestral Puebloans (details) New archaeological evidence challenges the origins of Zoroastrianism (details) Cultural diversity for early modern humans occurred in Africa (details)
  • Audio News for August 10 to 16, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    18 Aug 2014 | 7:28 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Early Japanese tomb reveals unusual stepped pyramid construction (details) Interdisciplinary research rewrites history of early Egytian embalming (details) New Greek tomb may hold associate of Alexander the Great (details) New Maya finds include two entire cities buried by jungle (details)
  • Audio News for August 3 to 9, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    11 Aug 2014 | 6:10 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Sumerian Noah emerges from the Penn Museum’s basement (details) Artifacts from an Etruscan well tell the history of wine in Chianti (details) New royal Chinese tomb yields the nation’s first intact jade coffin (details) Stormy weather reveals new geoglyphs in the Nazca Desert of Peru (details)
  • Audio News for July 27 to August 2, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    4 Aug 2014 | 8:50 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Danish bog shows ritualistic destruction of fallen Iron Age warriors (details) Wine cup of Pericles found in Athenian grave (details) Cahokia Mound bundle is material depiction of cosmological beliefs (details) Turkic burial site honored nomads of Kazakhstan (details)
 
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    MorgansLists.com

  • 6 Organisms That Can Survive The Fallout From A Nuclear Explosion

    Morgans Lists
    29 Aug 2014 | 2:13 pm
    An animal's ability to survive the fallout from a nuclear explosion is usually dependent on its ability to withstand radiation, otherwise know as radioresistance. Radioresistant life forms or ionizing-radiation-resistant organisms (IRRO) are a group of organisms that require large doses of radiation, 1000 gray (Gy), to achieve a 90% reduction in their survival rate. To put it in perspective, a human would need anywhere between 4-10 (Gy) to achieve the same result and a dog could withstand even less, about 3.5 (Gy). Gray, with the symbol of (Gy), is a unit of measurement used to describe the…
  • 6 Organisms That Can Survive Travel In The Vacuum Of Space

    Morgans Lists
    27 Aug 2014 | 1:18 pm
    Panspermia is the theory that life spreads throughout the universe from planet to planet, and solar system to solar system. Distributed by meteoroids, asteroids, comets, and even through spacecraft via unintended contamination from alien contact. For example, during an Apollo mission to the moon there was a stowaway, the common bacteria Streptococcus mitis, took a walk on the moon with the astronauts and lived to return home and tell it's tale. In 1991, Apollo 12 Commander Pete Conrad commented on the significance of the only known microbial survivor of harsh interplanetary travel:"I always…
  • 8 Pieces of Crazy and Unconventional Performance Art

    Morgans Lists
    25 Aug 2014 | 10:08 am
    Performance art challenges accepted conventions and traditional forms of visual art such as painting and sculpture. Sometimes performance art focuses on the human body as it's canvas through movement, dance, or actions and activity not usually associated with art. It is normally presented live by the artist and their collaborators and sometimes with hired performers. Recently, performance art is becoming more and more unusual as the bounds of conventionality are stretched further and further to shock audiences and enable new artists to make a name for themselves. Here is 8 pieces of crazy and…
  • What Did Ancient Greek Music Sound Like? - Listen Here

    Morgans Lists
    19 Aug 2014 | 11:55 am
    David Creese of the University of Newcastle plays an ancient Greek song taken from stone inscriptions constructed on an eight-string "canon" (a small stringed instrument) with movable bridges. (Audio file is ©BBC)Music is a part of human nature, and evidence of musical instruments shows up consistently in the archaeological record. We can track the first flute-like instrument all the way back to the Neanderthals. The ancient Greeks played their music on stringed instruments like a zither or the lyre as well as reed pipes, and percussion mediums. We know about the use of some of these…
  • 5 Animals That May Prove The Male Sex Is A Product Of Evolution

    Morgans Lists
    17 Aug 2014 | 3:12 pm
    The Bible tells us we were formed in God's image. So if a person believes in the Bible and takes it literally, but also believes in some science or the laws of the natural world. Then how would they reconcile their two beliefs if science were to prove the female of the species, of all species, came first? Many have asked the question, "Exactly which of our two visages is it, male or female, that came first?" Maybe both, or does just one of the sexes contain all the components we need? It is similar to the question "Did the chicken come first, or the egg?" But instead the…
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    NOSAS Archaeology Blog

  • Excavations on the Tarbat Peninsula: Scotsburn Dun (Iron Age Round House)

    nosas
    1 Sep 2014 | 2:25 pm
    By Vaidutis Žutautas (University of Aberdeen) Just above the left bank of steep wooded ravine of the Balagown river, remnants of a prehistoric dun (NH77NW 6, NH 7148 7616) sit on the sloped eminence surrounded by a complex of structural features, arguably belonging to it. The site has been known for a long time, as it still stands prominently and it is likely that it has not been disturbed by agricultural activities throughout centuries, although some possible robber trenches can be seen on the E side of the dun wall. Prevailing arguments suggesting that the roundhouse could carry the title…
  • Excavations on the Tarbat Peninsula: Scotsburn (Iron Age Broch or Dun)

    nosas
    7 Aug 2014 | 7:17 am
    Mid Excavation Report by Oskar Sveinbjarnason (University of Aberdeen) The excavation at Scotsburn House aims at dating the occupation as well as trying to discern if the site is a broch or a dun. Outer wall face of Scotsburn “house” with Roland. Photo from the trench with Leaf and James. A single trench 20m long and 2m wide was placed over the building wall and extends northwards over four rampart banks. The round house wall has been revealed but it has not shown yet if it is a broch or a dun. The ramparts have so far shown a nice stone facing. The site is getting more complex…
  • Excavations on the Tarbat Peninsula: Cnoc Tigh (Iron Age Round House)

    nosas
    27 Jul 2014 | 8:59 am
    by Oskar Sveinbjarnason (University of Aberdeen) The excavation started as planned on the 22nd June. A 15m long trench and 10m wide was opened over the northern part of the dun. It took 2 days to open up the area (gorse removal and grass) and as the surrounding field was under crop, a JCB was not able to access the site and speed up the opening. It soon became apparent that the site has been largely robbed of stones, likely during the 19th – 20th Century, possibly to make the enclosure which sits on top of the dun. The quarry holes can still be seen. It was a hard task to plan and remove…
  • Rhu Arisaig – Neolithic hide and seek

    nosas
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:32 am
    by Ken Bowker (NOSAS) In the autumn of 2012, Jean and I were asked, because of our experience in survey and archaeology, to join Elizabeth and Allan MacDonald and half a dozen others from Arisaig, about twelve miles north of where we live, in order to do a walkover survey of the Rhu Peninsula, a virtually- deserted five by three miles stretch of very rough ground immediately south of Arisaig. Many people will know this area by the winding coastal road that runs along the north side of the peninsula and round the western tip to the old ferry pier at the end of the public road. Beyond this a…
  • Keppoch: Recording a Township

    nosas
    15 Jul 2014 | 9:39 am
    By James McComas (NOSAS) Keppoch is a cleared village near Dundonnell in Wester Ross (NH 09519 88665). I have a visited a few such settlements before but it did not take long to realise that Keppoch was something special. This was partly the situation; overlooking as it does the wide valley floor of Strath Beag near the entrance to Little Loch Broom, with the snowy shoulders of An Teallach looming on the horizon. However the number and extent of the buildings easily identifiable was the real draw. Also poignancy was provided by the historical information we had, largely complied by Cathy…
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