Archaeology

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  • Excavation begins at England's Marden Henge

    Stone Pages Archaeo News
    2 Jul 2015 | 1:25 am
    Archaeologists are embarking on a three-year series of excavations in the Vale of Pewsey, between the prehistoric monuments of Stonehenge and Avebury - a little explored archaeological region of international...
  • Do you still use Film Photography in Archaeology? (update)

    Middle Savagery
    colleenmorgan
    25 Jun 2015 | 4:04 am
    Five years ago I posted a poll regarding digital vs film photography in archaeology. I’m finally publishing a lot of my writing about photography (I know, I know!) and I’d like an update on this poll. Take Our Poll Please take a moment to fill it out & share!  
  • Ancient Bobkitten Burial Identified

    Archaeological Headlines - Archaeology Magazine
    3 Jul 2015 | 1:16 pm
    SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS—In the 1980s, archaeologists excavating a Hopewell Culture (ca. 100 B.C.–A.D. 400) burial mound 50 miles north of St. Louis found the remains of 22 adults buried in a ring around an infant. They also discovered the skeleton of a small animal, which they assumed was a puppy, buried with a necklace made of marine shells and bear teeth. The Hopewell people were known to bury dogs in village sites, so the discovery did not strike the team as unusual. But more recently, Max Planck Institute zooarchaeologist Angela Perri, a specialist in canine burials, examined…
  • Telepresence, Cyborg Archaeology and the Molecular Age

    Middle Savagery
    colleenmorgan
    16 Jun 2015 | 2:24 am
    Come Around, Lost Or Found, by Kendal Murray Perhaps the greatest gift of my postdoc has been the crash introduction to the Molecular Age. As a digital archaeologist, I have been immersed in all things technoscience, but it was still a revelation to understand the incredible, diverse detail archaeologists can glean from a single tooth. Finding the interfaces between molecular bioarchaeology and digital methods is incredibly exciting, especially as it allows me to articulate a cyborg archaeology–drawing from Donna Haraway, Elizabeth Grosz and N. Katherine Hayles to understand…
  • Second "Kamikaze" Shipwreck Discovered

    Archaeological Headlines - Archaeology Magazine
    3 Jul 2015 | 1:47 pm
    MATSURRA, JAPAN—The Asahi Shimbun reports that underwater archaeologists surveying the waters off the island of Takashima have located the remains a second shipwreck that was part of one of the two 13th-century Mongol invasions that were destroyed by the “divine wind” (Kamikaze) typhoons. Artifacts from the second invasion, in 1281, have been found around Takashima Island, and a vessel from that fleet was discovered in 2011. The recently discovered ship is estimated to have been 65 feet long and around 20 feet wide and was carrying 13th-century Chinese ceramics, as well as…
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    Archaeological Headlines - Archaeology Magazine

  • Second "Kamikaze" Shipwreck Discovered

    3 Jul 2015 | 1:47 pm
    MATSURRA, JAPAN—The Asahi Shimbun reports that underwater archaeologists surveying the waters off the island of Takashima have located the remains a second shipwreck that was part of one of the two 13th-century Mongol invasions that were destroyed by the “divine wind” (Kamikaze) typhoons. Artifacts from the second invasion, in 1281, have been found around Takashima Island, and a vessel from that fleet was discovered in 2011. The recently discovered ship is estimated to have been 65 feet long and around 20 feet wide and was carrying 13th-century Chinese ceramics, as well as…
  • Ancient Bobkitten Burial Identified

    3 Jul 2015 | 1:16 pm
    SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS—In the 1980s, archaeologists excavating a Hopewell Culture (ca. 100 B.C.–A.D. 400) burial mound 50 miles north of St. Louis found the remains of 22 adults buried in a ring around an infant. They also discovered the skeleton of a small animal, which they assumed was a puppy, buried with a necklace made of marine shells and bear teeth. The Hopewell people were known to bury dogs in village sites, so the discovery did not strike the team as unusual. But more recently, Max Planck Institute zooarchaeologist Angela Perri, a specialist in canine burials, examined…
  • Everyday Life at Angkor Wat Investigated

    2 Jul 2015 | 2:30 pm
      PHNOM PENH, CAMBODIA—A team led by University of Sydney archaeologist Alison Carter is excavating the site of an ordinary house at Ankor Wat. Until now, researchers have concentrated their efforts on the more spectacular remains of the capital of the Khmer Empire, which flourished between the ninth and fifteenth centuries A.D. “We’ve spent a lot of time focusing on the temples and inscriptions and the elite members of the society, but there’s still so much that can be learned about the regular people who were contributing to the Angkorian empire," Carter told…
  • Ancient Tuscan Villa Opens its Doors

    2 Jul 2015 | 2:00 pm
    GIANUTTRI, ITALY—An impressive ancient Roman villa that has been closed to the public for more than a decade has reopened for visitors, according to Discovery News. The so-called “Villa Domitia,” named after the family of the Domitii Ahenobarbi who likely owned it, the sprawling seaside property located on a tiny island in Tuscany near the island of Giglio, the location of the Costa Concordia shipwreck three and a half years ago. Because there was no fresh water or raw materials on the island, according to Paola Rendini, the archaeological superintendent of Tuscany, it was a…
  • Looted Indian Statue to be Returned

    2 Jul 2015 | 1:30 pm
    NEW YORK CITY—The Wall Street Journal reports that a looted sacred Indian statue has been recovered by federal customs agents. The two-foot-tall bronze statue depicts the Tamil poet and saint Manikkavichavakar and dates to the 11th century. It's thought that the statue was taken from a village temple in southeastern India about a decade ago. It was voluntarily surrendered to officials by a collector who purchased it from a dealer who allegedly smuggled it into the U.S. and sold it using a false ownership history. The federal government intends to repatriate the object to India,…
 
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    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek

  • TOC & CFP, J. African Diaspora Archaeology & Heritage, June 2015

    Christopher Fennell
    28 Jun 2015 | 7:06 am
    Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and HeritageVol. 4, Issue 2, July 2015This issue is now available online at:http://www.maneyonline.com/toc/jaf/4/2 Parting Ways Revisited: Archaeology at a Nineteenth-Century African-American Community in Plymouth, Massachusetts By Karen A. Hutchins-Keim J. African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage, Vol. 4, No. 2: 115-142. http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/2161944115Z.00000000025?ai=yo&ui=1xs&af=T Analysis of an African Burial Ground in Nineteenth-Century Jamaica By Paula Saunders J. African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage, Vol. 4,…
  • TAC Conference on Cultural Heritage Media: Please come

    Rick Pettigrew
    24 Jun 2015 | 10:27 am
    To our archaeologist colleagues and those with similar interests: If you have an interest in how the media portrays archaeology, we are planning the gathering for you that will take place May 11-15, 2016. This event, The Archaeology Channel Conference on Cultural Heritage Media, takes place in connection with our annual juried film competition, The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival. Find Conference details at http://archaeologychannel.org/events-guide/tac-conference-on-cultural-heritage-media-2016 and our Festival page at…
  • First Call for Entries: TAC Festival 2016

    Rick Pettigrew
    16 Jun 2015 | 2:53 pm
    To our film producer and distributor friends:We invite you now to submit entries for the 2016 edition of The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival.  This is the only international competition for this genre in the entire Western Hemisphere and a wonderful showcase for your work.  Our deadline for receipt of entries is October 15, 2015.  Film screenings for TAC Festival 2016 take place May 11-15, 2016, in the Recital Hall at The Shedd Institute here in Eugene, Oregon, USA.  You can find our entry form and further information by going to…
  • Strata: Portraits of Humanity features ancient UK landscape and more

    Rick Pettigrew
    16 Mar 2015 | 11:30 am
    Friends and colleagues: You can see two unique features in the March 2015 edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV: * From King Arthur and the Isle of Avalon to the incredibly preserved remains of prehistoric trackways and lake villages, the unique wetland of the Somerset Levels and Moors in southwest England has a rich and varied heritage. * For 50 years, Basque families across the American West have gathered in Elko, Nevada, on the July Fourth weekend to celebrate their culture. This segment displays the 2013 National Basque Festival, featuring music, dancing,…
  • TOC & CFP, J. African Diaspora Archaeology & Heritage

    Christopher Fennell
    4 Mar 2015 | 3:51 pm
    Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage Vol. 4, Issue 1, March 2015 This issue is now available online at: http://www.maneyonline.com/toc/jaf/4/1 Indians of African Descent Special Collection, edited by Shihan De Silva Jayasuriya Table of Contents Indians of African Descent: Emerging Roles and New Identities By Shihan De Silva Jayasuriya J. of African Diaspora Archaeology & Heritage, Vol. 4, No. 1: 1-18. http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/2161944114Z.00000000019 Transplant and Ampersand Identity: The Siddis of Diu, India By Ababu Minda Yimene J. of African Diaspora…
 
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    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog

  • Exhibition on prehistoric jade in Taiwan

    noelbynature
    5 Jul 2015 | 5:37 pm
    There is an exhibition of prehistoric jade in Taipei city, which runs until October 31. Jade from Taiwan was quite far-flung in prehistoric times, reaching across waters in the Philippines and Vietnam as far back as 5,000 years ago. Exhibition on Prehistoric Jade in Taiwan. Source: Taiwan Today 20150703 Prehistoric jade exhibition opens in Taipei Taiwan Today, 03 July 2015 A prehistoric jade exhibition kicked off July 1 at Taiwan Power Co.’s main hall in Taipei City, highlighting the rich cultural diversity of Taiwan. Jointly organized by Taitung County-based National Museum of Prehistory…
  • Sinking Candi Sukuh closed for restoration

    noelbynature
    5 Jul 2015 | 5:24 pm
    Candi Sukuh in Java is being closed while repairs are done to it to prevent the ancient temple from deteriorating further. The masonry of the temple has been falling apart in recent years, due to among other things, the effect of earthquakes. Candi Sukuh, Java, Indonesia Centuries-old Sukuh temple undergoing restoration work Jakarta Post, 29 June 2015 The Central Java Cultural Heritage Preservation Center (BPCB) has begun restoring Sukuh temple in Karanganyar regency, Central Java, aiming to prevent existing structural damage in the centuries-old temple from worsening. The pyramid-shaped…
  • The Sub Champa Museum and the Southeast Asian Ceramics Museum

    noelbynature
    29 Jun 2015 | 6:06 am
    Over the weekend the Nation featured two museums of archaeological interest in Thailand, the Sub Champa Museum in Lopburi and the Southeast Asian Ceramics Museum in Pathum Thani. Source: The Nation 20150627 How our ancestors lived The Nation, 28 June 2015 Two museums, one of Lop Buri, the other in Pathum Thani, pay testament to the ancient way of life The historical parks of Ayutthaya and Sukhothai have long been attracting tourists, both Thai and foreign, yet the ancient Dvaravati resettlement of Sub Champa in Lop Buri province, itself a fascinating historical site, is barely known outside…
  • The archaeology of an Angkorian household

    noelbynature
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:54 am
    The Phnom Penh Post’s feature on an ongoing excavation in Angkor Wat, led by my friend Alison Carter. While working within the grounds of the famed temple, the excavation is looking to uncover the daily lives of the common people who would have lived in the complex. Angkor Wat excavation. Source : Phnom Penh Post 20150627 Archaeologists digging in search of common people Phnom Penh Post, 27 June 2015 In Angkor Wat research, the focus has long been on temples and high society. A new project there is taking a different approach, laying the foundation for a new understanding of the iconic…
  • Vietnamese navy receive series of old sea maps

    noelbynature
    28 Jun 2015 | 6:44 pm
    The Vietnamese navy is handed a collection of old maps that note its sovereignty over disputed islands in the South China Sea for hundreds of years. Ancient sea map of Vietnam. Source: Viet Nam News 20150626 Navy receives maps of Hoang Sa, Truong Sa Viet Nam News, 26 April 2015 The Ministry of Information and Communication has delivered a documentation collection, ‘Map Exhibition of Hoang Sa (Paracel) and Truong Sa (Spratly) of Viet Nam – Historical and Legal Evidence,’ to the navy force. The collection, which was handed over to the Command of Navy Zone 3, includes 132 maps and…
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    Middle Savagery

  • Do you still use Film Photography in Archaeology? (update)

    colleenmorgan
    25 Jun 2015 | 4:04 am
    Five years ago I posted a poll regarding digital vs film photography in archaeology. I’m finally publishing a lot of my writing about photography (I know, I know!) and I’d like an update on this poll. Take Our Poll Please take a moment to fill it out & share!  
  • A Decade of Archaeology in Action on Flickr

    colleenmorgan
    24 Jun 2015 | 8:18 am
    Nya lödöse 150312-2439. Sweden. I’ve been using Flickr for photographs since 2005, and have administered a group “Archaeology in Action” for almost as long. There’s 630 members and almost 4,200 photographs of archaeologists doing that thing we like doing so well. Archaeologist Mary Weahkee during an Education Outreach event. New Mexico, USA. Interestingly, being the admin for the group helped me define what it meant to be an “archaeologist in action”–what does our discipline cover? It also helped me define what an archaeological photograph is,…
  • EUROTAST Videos

    colleenmorgan
    23 Jun 2015 | 6:26 am
    As part of my postdoc, I’ve been making short videos highlighting the research of the PhD fellows associated with EUROTAST. These are mixtures of footage that was shot previously, my own footage, and Creative Commons found footage. They have been a challenge to make. Finding the proper visuals and music to accompany the incredibly sensitive research on genetics, identity and the difficult heritage of the Transatlantic Slave Trade has made the creative process much slower and considered than usual. Still, I’m relatively pleased with how they’ve come out, considering…
  • Health & Safety for Academic Archaeologists (Part 2)

    colleenmorgan
    22 Jun 2015 | 7:37 am
    With summertime coming around again, it is time for archaeologists to post photos of breathtakingly dangerous practice. I wonder sometimes if the digital age will eventually help improve practice at archaeological excavations through public censure and raised awareness. I’m not sure–my first Health & Safety for Academic Archaeologists (part 1) was posted in 2011 when I was shocked and outraged at stunning disregard for the wellbeing of workers displayed in photographs in the New York Times. But have things changed? Apparently not. I was alerted to this particular instance…
  • Telepresence, Cyborg Archaeology and the Molecular Age

    colleenmorgan
    16 Jun 2015 | 2:24 am
    Come Around, Lost Or Found, by Kendal Murray Perhaps the greatest gift of my postdoc has been the crash introduction to the Molecular Age. As a digital archaeologist, I have been immersed in all things technoscience, but it was still a revelation to understand the incredible, diverse detail archaeologists can glean from a single tooth. Finding the interfaces between molecular bioarchaeology and digital methods is incredibly exciting, especially as it allows me to articulate a cyborg archaeology–drawing from Donna Haraway, Elizabeth Grosz and N. Katherine Hayles to understand…
 
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    Looting Matters

  • Looting in Syria

    David Gill
    6 Jul 2015 | 12:50 am
    Rachel Shabi has written a carefully researched piece on Syrian antiquities are that are being offered for sale in London ('Looting in Syria - and for sale in the UK', The Guardian Saturday 4 July 2015, 32-33). This builds on earlier observations explored in the BBC Radio 4 File on Four programme.
  • From the Koutoulakis Collection

    David Gill
    11 Jun 2015 | 4:38 am
    Peter Watson explored the relationship between Giacomo Medici and Nikolas Koutoulakis. Koutoulakis' name also appears in the 'organigram'. So would a potential buyer be nervous if a Greek object was on offer with its stated collecting history ("provenance") as 'from the Koutoulakis collection'?
  • The Koutoulakis Herm returns to Greece

    David Gill
    10 Jun 2015 | 3:07 am
    Source: Hellenic Ministry of CultureIn October 2014 Bonhams offered a Roman herm that it was claimed to have been in the collection of Nicolas Koutoulakis collection in Geneva since 1965. But Glasgow University researcher Dr Christos Tsirogiannis spotted that the head had been offered on the market in the spring of 1987, undermining the collecting history presented in the catalogue.The head has now been returned to Athens and features in a major press release. Sadly Tsirogiannis' contribution is not acknowledged.I have written on the issues relating to this herm in the Journal of Art Crime…
  • Journal of Art Crime 2015 (Spring)

    David Gill
    8 Jun 2015 | 1:49 pm
    The Spring number of the Journal of Art Crime, edited by Noah Charney, is now available.Here is the table of contents for the latest issue of this bi-annual publication listing the archaeological papers that will be of interest to readers of LM:ACADEMIC ARTICLESAnalyzing Criminality in the Market for Ancient Near Eastern Art by Ryan Casey Damaging the Archaeological Record: The Lenborough Hoard by David Gill“But We Didn’t Steal It:” Collectors’ Justifications for Purchasing Looted Antiquities by Erin L. Thompson REGULAR COLUMNSContext Matters “From Palmyra to Mayfair:…
  • From an old Montecito collection

    David Gill
    4 Jun 2015 | 6:49 am
    When a Palmyrene sculpture appears on the market you would expect the auction house to provide an authenticated collecting history. "Acquired prior to 1996" sounds rather imprecise and suggests that there is no documented collecting history showing the sculpture's origins.
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    Stone Pages Archaeo News

  • Excavation begins at England's Marden Henge

    2 Jul 2015 | 1:25 am
    Archaeologists are embarking on a three-year series of excavations in the Vale of Pewsey, between the prehistoric monuments of Stonehenge and Avebury - a little explored archaeological region of international...
  • Was this the first recorded murder?

    2 Jul 2015 | 1:24 am
    In a remote part of Northern Spain, at an archaeological site known as Sima de los Huesos (literal translation - Pit of Bones), a team of researchers have found what...
  • Iron Age warrior lived with arrowhead in spine

    30 Jun 2015 | 4:00 am
    A horrific spinal injury caused by a bronze arrowhead didn't immediately kill an Iron Age warrior, who survived long enough for his bone to heal around the metal point, a...
  • Volunteers help restore ramparts of Northumberland hillfort

    30 Jun 2015 | 3:59 am
    Volunteers from Northumberland National Park (North East England) have seen the culmination of many years of work as major conservation started to repair the crumbling ramparts of Harehaugh Hillfort in...
  • Cornwall was scene of prehistoric gold rush

    30 Jun 2015 | 3:56 am
    New archaeological research is revealing that south-west Britain was the scene of a prehistoric gold rush. Geological estimates now indicate that up to 200 kilos of gold was extracted in...
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    Archaeology News from Past Horizons

  • Forgotten World: The Stone-walled Settlements of the Mpumalanga Escarpment

    Past Horizons
    1 Jul 2015 | 6:46 am
    We have much to learn from the Bakoni. For one, they taught us that political centralisation does not necessarily equate economic development. They also debunk colonial perceptions that prior to the arrival of settler farming, African agriculture was rudimentary, subsistence oriented, transient and barely capitalised.
  • 49,000 year-old ochre based paint mixed with milk found in Sibudu Cave

    Past Horizons
    1 Jul 2015 | 6:07 am
    The powdered paint mixture was found on the edge of a small stone flake in a layer of Sibudu Cave, a rock shelter in northern KwaZulu-Natal, Africa, that was occupied by anatomically modern humans in the Middle Stone Age from roughly 77,000 years ago to about 38,000 years ago.
  • Footprint on Roman tile found at Vindolanda

    Past Horizons
    30 Jun 2015 | 1:49 am
    Someone 2000 years ago quite literally put their foot in it and as a result a volunteer digging at the site has unearthed a tile with a clear imprint of a human foot.
  • Participate in Day of Archaeology 2015

    Past Horizons
    27 Jun 2015 | 5:23 am
    Day of Archaeology is looking for people working, studying or volunteering in the archaeological world to participate on Friday 24th July 2015.
  • DNA from early European jaw bone shows recent Neanderthal ancestor

    Past Horizons
    24 Jun 2015 | 1:42 pm
    In 2002, archaeologists discovered the jawbone of a human who lived in Europe about 40,000 years ago. Geneticists have now analysed ancient DNA from that jawbone and learned that it belonged to a modern human whose recent ancestors included Neanderthals.
 
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    The Archaeology News Network

  • UNESCO condemns destruction at Palmyra

    3 Jul 2015 | 8:00 am
    Condemning the destruction of archaeological treasures from the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra as a “perverse…new attempt to break the bonds between people and their history,” the head of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) today called on the international community, including the art market, to join forces and stop the traffic in cultural property. The 1,900-year-old Lion of Al-Lat statue is... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Second 13th century Mongolian shipwreck found off Japan

    3 Jul 2015 | 7:00 am
    A shipwreck found here is the second confirmed vessel from a 13th century Mongolian fleet that foundered in a typhoon in a failed attempt to invade Japan, researchers said July 2. The bow of a ship believed to be from a 13th century Mongolian invasion attempt,  off Matsuura, Nagasaki Prefecture [Credit: University of the Ryukyus]Archaeologists from the University of the Ryukyus and the Matsuura city board of education determined... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Roman-era granaries revealed at ancient Tripolis

    3 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    Structures from 1,900 years ago have been unearthed during archaeological excavations in the ancient city of Tripolis, located in the western province of Denizli’s Buldan district. The structures were used as granaries, according to officials. The archaeological excavations have been ongoing in Tripolis, located on a triangle of Phrygia, Karia and Lydia. The head of the excavations, Pamukkale University Archaeology Department member... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Dinosaur eggshells unearthed in Japan

    3 Jul 2015 | 4:30 am
    An area of 20 square metres is slightly smaller than a tennis court. That is more than enough room for a game-changing discovery that sheds new light, and opens up more questions, about the diversity of dinosaurs in Cretaceous-era Japan. Fossilized fragments of a new type of dinosaur egg have been found in Tanba, Hyogo Prefecture.  The egg is characterized by a unique branch-like pattern on the surface.  The scale is... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Egypt's Mons Claudianus to become open-air museum

    2 Jul 2015 | 11:00 am
    The Ministry of Antiquities approved the development of the Mons Claudianus archaeological site into an open air museum to exhibit the quarrying process used in Egypt during the Roman era. The Mons Claudianus archaeological site that stretches from the Red Sea to Qena province  is to be restored with the view of developing it into an open air museum of  Roman era quarrying in Egypt [Credit: Wikimapia]Mons Claudianus is an... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    The Mathisen Corollary

  • The Gospel of Thomas and the Divine Twin

    David Warner Mathisen
    6 Jul 2015 | 3:08 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).Why was an entire "library" of ancient texts carefully sealed in a large storage jar at the base of the steep cliffs of the massif known today as the Jabal al-Tarif, along the banks of the Nile River in Egypt not far from the ancient city of Thebes, sometime during the second half of what we label today as the fourth century AD (the fourth century being the years in the 300s, since the first century AD are the years with numbers below 100, causing all the subsequent centuries to be "one higher" than the year-numbers, which is why the years in the 1900s were the…
  • New! "Terrain map" to help navigate this site

    David Warner Mathisen
    4 Jul 2015 | 12:42 am
    I've just posted a new series of "subject-headings" over at a website called davidmathisen.com which I hope will provide a sort of "terrain map" or "table of contents" to assist visitors in navigating through the wide range of related and interconnected subjects explored in this blog.As I explain in a section of that site entitled "Welcome and Thank You for Visiting," during the course of pursuing and writing about these inter-related topics since this blog's inception in April of 2011, the discussion has ranged over such a wide landscape that I felt the need to define some general "regions"…
  • Why divinities can appear in an instant: The inner connection to the Infinite

    David Warner Mathisen
    3 Jul 2015 | 5:11 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).Why do the deities in the Mahabharata often appear instantly, upon the recitation of a mantra, the singing of a hymn, or even simply upon being remembered? I believe that this characteristic was included in the ancient scriptures in order to show us that we have access to the infinite at all times -- and indeed that in a very real sense we can and should avail ourselves of that access on a regular basis, in this life.Many previous posts have explored the critically important assertion of Alvin Boyd Kuhn which is in many ways a key to our understanding of…
  • Glorious Jupiter and Venus, and the Five-Husband Pattern in the Mahabharata and John 4

    David Warner Mathisen
    29 Jun 2015 | 3:35 am
    image: Stellarium (stellarium.org).Observers of the night sky have for some time now been watching with great anticipation the steady approach of the planet Jupiter to dazzling Venus in the western sky during the hours after sunset. The two are now extremely close, just over one degree apart on June 28. As described in the always-helpful "This Week's Sky at a Glance," from Sky & Telescope, the two will be a mere 0.6 degrees apart on June 29, and reach their closest point on June 30 when they will close to 0.3 degrees before Jupiter passes on and continues on his way. (Note that these…
  • Star Myths of the World: The Hymn to Durga in the Mahabharata

    David Warner Mathisen
    28 Jun 2015 | 12:26 am
    If the evidence presented in previous discussions for concluding that the Bhagavad Gita and the ancient Sanskrit epic Mahabharata which contains the Gita was not enough to convince the most skeptical reader that these ancient scriptures are indeed Star Myths, built upon the same system of celestial metaphor that can be shown to form the basis of virtually all of the myths, scriptures and sacred stories around the world (see here for links to evidence found in myths from ancient Japan to the Maya, from Africa to Scandinavia, and from the Old and New Testaments of the Bible as well as the myths…
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    Cultural Heritage Lawyer Rick St. Hilaire

  • House Adopts The Foreign Cultural Exchange Jurisdictional Immunity Clarification Act

    9 Jun 2015 | 7:14 pm
    The Foreign Cultural Exchange Jurisdictional Immunity Clarification Act passed the House of Representatives late this afternoon. H.R. 889, which received broad bipartisan support by legislators in Congress, now goes to the Senate.The committee report accompanying the legislation explained that "a provision in the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (FSIA) discourages foreign governments from lending government-owned artwork and objects of cultural significance to U.S. museums and educational institutions for temporary exhibition or display. Foreign governments…
  • House Passes Protect and Preserve International Cultural Property Act

    1 Jun 2015 | 10:14 pm
    On Monday afternoon, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 1493, the Protect and Preserve International Cultural Property Act.CHL has prepared a video snippet of the debate and vote, courtesy of C-Span. Watch below or click here if you are experiencing difficulty.©2010-2014 Cultural Heritage Lawyer. Content is general information only, not legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is formed. Links are not endorsements of websites’ contents. Other opinions are their own. Information presented is not attorney advertising.
  • Culture Under Threat Conference in Cairo: Red Arch Raises Important Questions Posed by U.S. Imports of Art, Collectors' Pieces, and Antiques

    21 May 2015 | 8:08 pm
    Why did the declared value of U.S. general imports of antiques over 100 years old from Syria climb 133% between 2012 and 2013, from approximately $4.7 million to $11 million?Why did the declared value of U.S. general imports of antiques over 100 years old from Iraq skyrocket 1302% between 2009 and 2013, from $322,564 to $4,523,126?These were some of the questions posed by Red Arch Cultural Heritage Law & Policy Research at an historic international summit held in Cairo on May 13 and 14.Antiquities Coalition co-founder and Red Arch board member Peter Herdrich(far left) stands with…
  • Cultural Property Protection Bill Reintroduced in the House

    21 Mar 2015 | 9:01 am
    "We need to strengthen our ability to stop history's looters from profiting off their crimes," declared Rep. Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.-16) on Friday after introducing H.R. 1493, whose stated purpose is to "protect and preserve international cultural property risk due to instability, armed conflict, or natural or other disasters, and for other purposes."The proposed legislation is similar to a bill the lawmaker introduced last congressional session, the Protect and Preserve International Cultural Property Act (H.R. 5703), which failed to become law.The text of the…
  • The Assyrian Head Repatriation: Filling in the Details of ICE's Investigation

    19 Mar 2015 | 12:00 pm
    This week U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) returned a looted fragmented limestone head of Assyrian King Sargon II to Iraq. The stone carving once sat atop a sculpted winged bull.In remarks prepared for Monday's repatriation ceremony held at the Iraqi Consulate in Washington, D.C., Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security and ICE Director Sarah R. Saldaña declared, “ICE will not allow the illicit greed of some to trump the cultural history of an entire nation.”ICE offered limited details in a press release about…
 
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    The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty

  • Wee Ones and Picts, Oh My!

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    19 Jun 2015 | 5:42 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome to Episode 23 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty! I’m Jenny, a big old history nerd with a dramatic streak and a lack of creative outlets. Hence the podcast. The show has taken a little bit of a hiatus while I figure out some life things, and for that I am sorry. But, if it makes you feel any better, my “life things” turns out to be a pretty cool development. He’s about 7 months along right now and getting ready to pop this fall. That’s right! I’m expecting a little shovelbum and couldn’t be…
  • Episode 22 “Paleo Muffins”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    2 Mar 2015 | 6:17 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome to a new episode of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty! In this episode we’re going Paleo…Paleo diet that is! There’s been a bit of controversy concerning this “lifestyle” from the anthropological community. So I thought we’d examine the concept of the diet and what it does and doesn’t have to do with the lives of our paleolithic ancestors. Also, (to be read with your best Jerry Seinfeld impression) what, is the deal, with Paleo muffins? Here are some links you might be interested in checking out…
  • Episode 21 “The Archaeology of Alcohol: Ancient Ales Edition”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    19 Jan 2015 | 3:57 pm
     Subscribe to my feed! Welcome to Episode 21 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty “The Archaeology of Alcohol: Ancient Ales Edition!” I suggest you sit back, pop open a cold one, get a little toasty, and enjoy this generally informative fun-times podcast. So, our ancestors have been making alcoholic concoctions for thousands of years, and thanks to science and archaeology we now have the ability to reconstruct the recipes to some of these awesome drinks. I thought it would be interesting to find out about how alcohol has evolved from its early days to…
  • Episode 20 “What’s Next?”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    2 Dec 2014 | 4:40 am
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back! It’s Episode 20 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty, “What’s Next?” So, I thought I’d catch you up on recent events relating to grad school and my career(Spoiler: I’m graduating, yay me!). That turned into the perfect opportunity for me to dispense some sagely advice about going out into the job market and figuring out what to do after school. If you’re looking for some great sources to look for jobs or learn about how to get jobs, I suggest you check out some of the sources I listed in…
  • Episode 19 “Caen you handle this? It’s France, part Deux!”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    2 Oct 2014 | 11:50 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back to The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty! This is episode 19 of the podcast “Caen you handle this? It’s France, part Deux!” In this, the second installment of Jenny’s French adventures, we talk about my time in Paris and the Normandy region. Some of the things I waxed on about in this episode include: What’s up with city planning and historical relevance in Paris? Saint Denis Paris? Really? His name is Denis… Jenny’s movie recommendation for the month: Midnight in Paris Guess the obscure musical…
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    AntiquityNOW

  • AntiquityNOW Wishes You a Happy and Safe Fourth of July!

    AntiquityNOW
    4 Jul 2015 | 2:00 am
    Planning on enjoying fireworks? Read our blog post, “The History of Fireworks: Celebrating Life’s Moments in Color, Light and Sound,” to learn more about the history of fireworks! Or, if you have kids or students, check out our annotated Kids’ Blog, “Boom! … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! A Roman Pig, Hot Dogs, Eating Contests and Four Patriots: Happy July 4th

    AntiquityNOW
    1 Jul 2015 | 2:00 am
    This weekend on July 4th, the United States celebrates its independence. There are pool parties, picnics, concerts in the park, fireworks and most importantly, food! Perhaps the most ubiquitous food on the fourth is the hotdog. Chicago-style, New York-style or … Continue reading →
  • “Is it Time to Rethink Our Ideas About Preserving World Heritage?” A Provocative Question in Dire Times

    AntiquityNOW
    30 Jun 2015 | 2:00 am
    The Financial Times’ recent article, “Is It Time to Rethink Our Ideas About Preserving World Heritage?” by Jonathan Foyle, explores whether in the face of the ongoing destruction of cultural heritage from natural disasters and “human aggression, theft and errors … Continue reading →
  • Strata: Portraits of Humanity, Episode 8, “Betty’s Hope”

    AntiquityNOW
    25 Jun 2015 | 2:00 am
    “Betty’s Hope,” the latest entry in the video news-magazine series Strata: Portraits of Humanity, produced by AntiquityNOW’s partner, Archaeological Legacy Institute, considers what we learn about past lives when we peel back the layers of history. Sugar plantations were incredibly … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! National Dairy Month

    AntiquityNOW
    24 Jun 2015 | 2:00 am
    It’s National Dairy Month in the United States and since the use of dairy in food has a long and rich history throughout antiquity, we thought we’d bring you a recap of some delicious and nutritious ways that ancient civilizations … Continue reading →
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    Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica

  • Audio News for June 21 to 27, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    29 Jun 2015 | 11:25 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Community archaeology program in Chicago explores a Civil War training and prison camp (details) CT scan of a Swedish mummified bishop reveals some surprises from the 17th century (details) Swiss archaeologists may have found a famous 14th-century battlefield (details) Oldest human footprints in North America discovered on British Columbia coast (details)
  • Audio News for June 14 to 20, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    22 Jun 2015 | 10:52 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: New digs prompted by river flooding in Canada (details) Graffiti reveals the flavor of life in ancient city in Turkey (details) Inscription from time of King David found near Jerusalem (details) Ancient Welsh group bonded through sharing feasts of pork (details)
  • Audio News for June 7 to 13, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    15 Jun 2015 | 11:21 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Scientists use ancient techniques in mead production to find an answer to antibiotic-resistant diseases (details) Archaeologist and local villagers work to protect a Fertile Crescent village site in war-torn Syria (details) Genetic study adds to study of Bronze Age migrations and the creation of modern Eurasia (details) Bison butchering site in Oklahoma part of a complex of Paleoindian hunting sites (details)
  • Audio News for May 31 to June 6, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    8 Jun 2015 | 8:55 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Scythian mound reveals a history of drugs and war (details) Coffin in Brittany holds fully dressed 17th century woman (details) Greek vase shows Amazon warrior using lasso (details) North and South Korea come together in dig at ancient palace (details)
  • Audio News from Archaeologica, May 24 to 30, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    1 Jun 2015 | 10:13 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: A Spanish cave yields a possible murder cold case over 430,000 years old (details) Evidence of ritual hallucinogenic use comes from a Philistine incineration pit in Israel (details) U.S.-Italian collaboration returns 25 looted artifacts to their cultural home (details) Controlled grass file on Montana’s prairie yields exciting new finds (details)
 
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    NOSAS Archaeology Blog

  • Cromarty Medieval Burgh Excavations 2014

    nosas
    27 Jun 2015 | 7:55 am
    by Mary Peteranna (AOC) Excavations to the north of Thief’s Row 2014 Our excavations in 2014 produced more informative data to assist with our research into the history of the Burgh of Cromarty including a more detailed picture of the layout and phasing of the buildings along each side of Thief’s Row, where our main excavation site is located (see a history of Thief’s Row) This includes the footings of three buildings shown on the 1880 Ordnance Survey map sheet on the north side of Thief’€™s Row, under which we identified the remains of another earlier structure,…
  • Rubh’ an Dunain, Skye: 8000 Years of History

    nosas
    23 Jun 2015 | 4:37 pm
    by Martin Wildgoose Aerial view of the Rubh’ an Dunain peninsula Members of NOSAS towards the tackman’s house on Rubh’ an Dunain. Canna is on the skyline. A warm sunny Sunday in early June saw NOSAS members gathering in the Glenbrittle campsite, at the foot of the Cuillin Mountains. The view south was spectacular, Canna seemed unusually close and South Uist and Barra lay in the haze on the horizon. Close at hand the Rubha an Dunain peninsular stretched out to the left of the bay with a ribbon of made-up path promising an easy walk to the point where 8000 years of Skye’s…
  • Lament for a once Magical Place – or “the Agony of a severely traumatised pair of Archaeological Sites”

    nosas
    9 May 2015 | 3:20 pm
    by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS) This is the story of two archaeological sites which have suffered severe damage through a catalogue of assaults by man in the name of “development”. The “patients”, for so they can be regarded, lie in Balblair Wood (read Ward!), near Beauly. They have received repeated injuries over the last 20 years and today are in a sad, sorry state – they have been in the wrong place at the wrong time! Patient A is (or was) an extensive linear prehistoric site, centred on NGR NH 501444; it once comprised 13 hut circles, 2 chambered cairns, burnt mounds and a field…
  • Mulchaich 18th Century Distillery, Ross-shire: a NOSAS Project

    nosas
    26 Apr 2015 | 8:50 am
    by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS) NOSAS members working at Mulchaich 16th August 2013 Over the years tradition has had it that there are the remains of a distillery dating back to the 18th Century at Mulchaich Farm, located in the district of Ferintosh on the Black Isle. The distillery site is about 200m NW of the farm and was previously unrecorded; it was in a sorry state being quite overgrown with whins and with the few open areas grossly trampled by cattle. In 2009 members of the North of Scotland Archaeological Society began a project which had as one of its aims the surveying and recording of…
  • The Rosemarkie Caves Project

    nosas
    20 Apr 2015 | 2:08 pm
    by Simon Gunn (NOSAS) The subterranean section of NOSAS, the Rosemarkie Caves Project (RCP), is planning more work in the caves this year (2015). The RCP was set up to research the archaeology of the caves on the Moray Firth coast near Rosemarkie. The group started its work in 2006 with a weekend excavation of Learnie 2B when evidence was found of occupation and leatherwork in the 19th century, probably by summer travellers. This was followed by a more ambitious 14 day dig at Cairds’ Cave in 2010, when we confirmed that the cave had been excavated 100 years before by local doctor…
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    eaglesanddragonspublishing.com

  • Tiryns: Mycenaean Stronghold and Place of Legend

    AdamAH
    5 Jul 2015 | 9:51 am
    This week, I wanted to leave behind the sad and depressing subject of the destruction of heritage to write about a site steeped in myth and legend – Tiryns. “In the south-eastern corner of the plain of Argos, on the west and lowest and flattest of those rocky heights which here form a group, and rise like islands from the marshy plain, at a distance of 8 stadia, or about 1500 m. from the Gulf of Argos, lay the prehistoric citadel of Tiryns, now called Palaeocastron.” (Heinrich Schliemann; Tiryns; 1885) I visited the site with family during the summer of 2002. It was a scorcher…
  • Preserving the Past – Some Thoughts on the Importance of Historic Places

    AdamAH
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:54 pm
    I’m talking about something a bit more personal for this post. Recently, I went back to my home town with my family. We were in the area and so we thought it might be fun to take a drive through the old neighbourhood. It’s kind of weird passing by primary and secondary schools where you spent so much time, and then happily pushed them from your mind. All that feel like another life. Our last stop was the last house my family owned. It was the oldest house in the area (over 100 years old), and belonged to the original landowner who had settled the area. This is a picture of the house: As…
  • The Links Between History and Mythology – A Guest Post by Luciana Cavallaro

    AdamAH
    22 Jun 2015 | 6:15 pm
    Today I have a special guest on the blog. Luciana Cavallaro is the author of a series of mythological retellings from the perspectives of some fascinating women in Greek myth. When I read her book, The Curse of Troy, I knew that I wanted to have her write a guest post for Writing the Past. Luciana has a wonderfully unique style, and she gives these accursed women of Greek myth a voice that you may not have heard before. So, without further ado, a big welcome to author, Luciana Cavallaro! First, I’d like to thank Adam for inviting me to be a guest blogger. I’ve been following Adam’s blog…
  • A Head for War – Top 10 Ancient and Medieval Battle Helmets

    AdamAH
    15 Jun 2015 | 6:52 pm
    Ancient Warriors – painting by Arturas Slapsys Some of the very first things that interested me in history as a young boy were weapons and armour. Boys will be boys, and so it’s no surprise that this is what drew me into the ancient and medieval worlds in the first place. I remember getting a used book called The Art of Chivalry, which I flipped through over and over again. I was mesmerized by the images of broad swords and gothic armour, the shields, the lines, and the hack marks from various battles. If there is one piece that has been common to most ancient cultures, it’s the…
  • Ancient Everyday – Getting Social with Sponges

    AdamAH
    9 Jun 2015 | 7:36 am
    Do you use a bathroom? Of course you do! Everybody does. They might vary in design or level of fanciness, sure, but every person on earth, and throughout history, has had to do their business. And they usually have done in a certain spot, be it a bush, a hole in the ground, a pot, or some form of toilet. And people, usually, have used something to clean their bits and pieces afterwards. Ok, maybe not so much in the Middle Ages (hygiene was less of a thing then), but certainly in the ancient world. I’m not usually one for bathroom history, but when it comes to the Romans I have to admit that…
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