Archaeology

  • Most Topular Stories

  • India pivots eastwards to Southeast Asia

    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog
    noelbynature
    28 Jul 2015 | 5:46 pm
    A conference was held last week in New Delhi on the cultural links between India and Southeast Asia with the aim of establishing research links between India and Southeast Asia. India, Asean reconnect through ancient cultural linkages Daijiworld.com, 23 July 2015 “Political security and economic cooperation must go hand in hand with the socio-cultural connection and people-to-people linkages,” he said. Citing examples, he said that excavations have found evidence of Indian links in the first century AD in Myanmar in the city of Beikthano, also known as City of Vishnu. Coins,…
  • Rooms Full of Jars Discovered at Israel’s Tel Kabri

    Archaeological Headlines - Archaeology Magazine
    28 Jul 2015 | 2:30 pm
    HAIFA, ISRAEL—The latest excavations at the 4,000-year-old site of Tel Kabri in northern Israel have uncovered three more rooms with plastered floors containing storage jars, and there are more rooms in the palace complex to be excavated. The palace at Tel Kabri, which resembles Crete’s palace of Knossos, was inhabited continuously for more than 250 years and features banquet rooms and halls. Last season, Assaf Yasur-Landau of the University of Haifa and Eric H. Cline of The George Washington University discovered a room full of storage jars that had contained an aromatic red…
  • Pythagoras’ Golden Verses – For a Good Life

    eaglesanddragonspublishing.com
    AdamAH
    27 Jul 2015 | 6:32 pm
    There has been a lot of negativity in the news these past weeks, mostly directed at Greece and Greek people. Many comments, including from high-profile public personages, have been outright prejudiced. Don’t worry. I’m not going to get into politics, who’s right, and who’s wrong, and how only the bankers seem to be winning anything. Ok, I slipped there. Sorry. With all the hatred and vitriol floating around the Web, I needed to go back to something uplifting, something ancient. I went back to a bit of research I had done on Pythagoras and the Golden Verses. These are a series of…
  • World's worst book review?

    Publishing Archaeology
    Michael E. Smith
    6 May 2015 | 6:38 pm
    A scholarly book review should do three things: (1) Describe the contents of the book. What is the book about, and what does it cover?  (2) Describe the scholarly context of the book. Where does the book fit within the literature, how does it relate to other works in terms of data, theory, or methods, etc. and, (3) Evaluate the book critically. I've written a lot about book reviews in this blog; for an overview, see my earliest such post.I have just read what may be the worst book review I have ever seen. I'll keep this anonymous to protect the guilty. Scholar A is reviewing an edited…
  • 4,000-year-old structure found in Ohio

    Stone Pages Archaeo News
    27 Jul 2015 | 1:34 am
    A team led by Brian Redmond of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History is excavating a 4,000-year-old site in northeastern Ohio. So far, they have uncovered a 75-millimetre-thick floor made...
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Archaeological Headlines - Archaeology Magazine

  • Cat’s Paw Prints Found on Roman Roof Tile

    29 Jul 2015 | 2:30 pm
    GLOUCESTER, ENGLAND—A cat’s paw prints were spotted on a first-century Roman roof tile unearthed in Gloucester in 1969 by an archaeologist who had been looking through the thousands of tile fragments stored at the Gloucester City Museum. “When Romans made roof tiles they left the wet clay out to dry in the sun. Animals, and people, sometimes walked across the drying tiles and left their footprints behind,” a museum spokesperson told The Telegraph. “Dog paw prints, people’s boot prints, and even a piglet’s trotter print have all be found on tiles from…
  • Study of Magnetic Fields Assisted by Iron Age Archaeology

    29 Jul 2015 | 2:00 pm
    ROCHESTER, NEW YORK—Information gathered by archaeologist Thomas Huffman of Witwatersrand University has assisted geophysicist John Tarduno and astrophysicist Eric Blackman of the University of Rochester, and geologist Michael Watkeys of the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. They are studying the magnetic field record in southern Africa, and its relationship to the reversals of the Earth’s magnetic poles. During the Iron Age in southern Africa, (between 1000 and 1500 A.D.), agricultural communities ritually cleansed their villages by burning down huts and grain bins.
  • Medieval Distillation Vessel Unearthed in Bulgaria

    29 Jul 2015 | 1:30 pm
    SOFIA, BULGARIA—The Sofia News Agency reports that while excavating the medieval Lyutitsa fortress above the town of Ivaylovgrad, a team led by archaeologist Filip Petrunov discovered a fragment of a vessel used for the distillation of rakia, a traditional fruit brandy that is still enjoyed today. The fragment, which dates to the eleventh century, is the second vessel for the distillation of rakia to be found in the fortress, and the third one to have been found in Bulgaria. All three vessels date to the eleventh century. It has been argued that Bulgarians did not begin to produce rakia…
  • Ground-Penetrating Radar Maps Lithuania’s Great Synagogue

    29 Jul 2015 | 1:00 pm
    JERUSALEM, ISRAEL—The Israel Antiquities Authority announced in a press release that significant remains of the Great Synagogue and Shulhof of Vilna have been mapped with ground-penetrating radar. The international research team was led by John Seligman of the Israel Antiquities Authority, Zenonas Baubonis of the Culture Heritage Conservation Authority of Lithuania, and Richard Freund of the University of Hartford. The Great Synagogue, built in the seventeenth century in the Renaissance-Baroque style, was the oldest monument of Jewish culture in Lithuania. The structure was eventually…
  • Rooms Full of Jars Discovered at Israel’s Tel Kabri

    28 Jul 2015 | 2:30 pm
    HAIFA, ISRAEL—The latest excavations at the 4,000-year-old site of Tel Kabri in northern Israel have uncovered three more rooms with plastered floors containing storage jars, and there are more rooms in the palace complex to be excavated. The palace at Tel Kabri, which resembles Crete’s palace of Knossos, was inhabited continuously for more than 250 years and features banquet rooms and halls. Last season, Assaf Yasur-Landau of the University of Haifa and Eric H. Cline of The George Washington University discovered a room full of storage jars that had contained an aromatic red…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily

  • New research on the causes of the Viking Age

    27 Jul 2015 | 6:28 am
    The Viking hit-and-run raids on monastic communities such as Lindisfarne and Iona were the most infamous result of burgeoning Scandinavian maritime prowess in the closing years of the Eighth Century.
  • Abrupt climate change may have rocked the cradle of civilization

    23 Jul 2015 | 3:13 pm
    New research reveals that some of the earliest civilizations in the Middle East and the Fertile Crescent may have been affected by abrupt climate change. These findings show that while socio-economic factors were traditionally considered to shape ancient human societies in this region, the influence of abrupt climate change should not be underestimated.
  • Genome analysis pins down arrival and spread of first Americans

    21 Jul 2015 | 10:49 am
    An international team of researchers compared the genomes of 31 living Native Americans, Siberians and people from Oceania with 23 ancient Native American genomes to establish a timeline for the arrival and spread of Amerindian populations. They concluded that the first Americans arrived after about 23,000 years ago and diverged around 13,000 years ago into two populations. They found no admixture of Polynesian or European genes, but did find some East Asian gene flow.
  • Genetic studies link indigenous peoples in the Amazon and Australasia

    21 Jul 2015 | 10:48 am
    Native Americans living in the Amazon bear an unexpected genetic connection to indigenous people in Australasia, suggesting a previously unknown wave of migration to the Americas thousands of years ago, a new study has found.
  • The last Viking and his 'magical' sword?

    14 Jul 2015 | 6:36 am
    Have you held the sword? Have you felt its weight? Have you felt how sharp and strong the blade is? A deadly weapon and symbol of power -- jewellery for a man, with 'magical properties'. The sword gave power to the warrior, but the warrior's strength could also be transferred to the sword. That is how they were bound together: man and weapon, warrior and sword.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek

  • Strata: Portraits of Humanity features Fijian warfare and cannibalism

    Rick Pettigrew
    15 Jul 2015 | 11:44 am
    Friends and colleagues: You can see two unique features in the July 2015 edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV: * The region surrounding Turkey’s Sea of Marmara, including the storied capitol city, Istanbul, is renowned for its visible reminders of antiquity. This is an archaeological and historical wonderland that draws visitors from all over the world. * Across the islands of Fiji, hilltop fortresses tell a tale of a warfare and cannibalism going back a thousand years, when the war gods demanded tribute or revenge. Yet people have been on these islands far…
  • TOC & CFP, J. African Diaspora Archaeology & Heritage, June 2015

    Christopher Fennell
    28 Jun 2015 | 7:06 am
    Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and HeritageVol. 4, Issue 2, July 2015This issue is now available online at:http://www.maneyonline.com/toc/jaf/4/2 Parting Ways Revisited: Archaeology at a Nineteenth-Century African-American Community in Plymouth, Massachusetts By Karen A. Hutchins-Keim J. African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage, Vol. 4, No. 2: 115-142. http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/2161944115Z.00000000025?ai=yo&ui=1xs&af=T Analysis of an African Burial Ground in Nineteenth-Century Jamaica By Paula Saunders J. African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage, Vol. 4,…
  • TAC Conference on Cultural Heritage Media: Please come

    Rick Pettigrew
    24 Jun 2015 | 10:27 am
    To our archaeologist colleagues and those with similar interests: If you have an interest in how the media portrays archaeology, we are planning the gathering for you that will take place May 11-15, 2016. This event, The Archaeology Channel Conference on Cultural Heritage Media, takes place in connection with our annual juried film competition, The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival. Find Conference details at http://archaeologychannel.org/events-guide/tac-conference-on-cultural-heritage-media-2016 and our Festival page at…
  • First Call for Entries: TAC Festival 2016

    Rick Pettigrew
    16 Jun 2015 | 2:53 pm
    To our film producer and distributor friends:We invite you now to submit entries for the 2016 edition of The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival.  This is the only international competition for this genre in the entire Western Hemisphere and a wonderful showcase for your work.  Our deadline for receipt of entries is October 15, 2015.  Film screenings for TAC Festival 2016 take place May 11-15, 2016, in the Recital Hall at The Shedd Institute here in Eugene, Oregon, USA.  You can find our entry form and further information by going to…
  • Strata: Portraits of Humanity features ancient UK landscape and more

    Rick Pettigrew
    16 Mar 2015 | 11:30 am
    Friends and colleagues: You can see two unique features in the March 2015 edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV: * From King Arthur and the Isle of Avalon to the incredibly preserved remains of prehistoric trackways and lake villages, the unique wetland of the Somerset Levels and Moors in southwest England has a rich and varied heritage. * For 50 years, Basque families across the American West have gathered in Elko, Nevada, on the July Fourth weekend to celebrate their culture. This segment displays the 2013 National Basque Festival, featuring music, dancing,…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog

  • India pivots eastwards to Southeast Asia

    noelbynature
    28 Jul 2015 | 5:46 pm
    A conference was held last week in New Delhi on the cultural links between India and Southeast Asia with the aim of establishing research links between India and Southeast Asia. India, Asean reconnect through ancient cultural linkages Daijiworld.com, 23 July 2015 “Political security and economic cooperation must go hand in hand with the socio-cultural connection and people-to-people linkages,” he said. Citing examples, he said that excavations have found evidence of Indian links in the first century AD in Myanmar in the city of Beikthano, also known as City of Vishnu. Coins,…
  • Singapore archaeology needs a permanent home

    noelbynature
    28 Jul 2015 | 5:38 pm
    I think the headline of the article is misleading – after all, archaeologists always need funds and resources, but the key point of the story is that archaeology in Singapore needs to be supported as a government funded agency or a university department, and not through volunteer labour and short term contract jobs as is the case today. This is not only to research the substantial backlog of material that has been unearthed thus far, but also assist in future heritage impact assessments and archaeological surveys. As an Singaporean archaeologist (who is not working in Singapore) I can…
  • China’s archaeology ship seeks buried sovereignty

    noelbynature
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:26 pm
    China’s archaeology research vessel, the Kaogu-01, comes with all the bells and whistles, but its deployment in the South China Sea is a source of concern to the maritime nations of Southeast Asia as it is being used to enforce China’s territorial claims far beyond its shores. Update: A reader pointed out that the link was missing. They are up now! Archaeology and the South China Sea The Diplomat, 20 July 2015 In 2013, China enforced those claims on an unsuspecting French archaeologist and his team investigating the wreck of a Chinese junk off the Philippine coast. According to…
  • The ceramics museum just north of Bangkok

    noelbynature
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:16 pm
    The Southeast Asian Ceramics Museum in Bangkok University (which is not technically in Bangkok but north of it) is a great place to look at a spectacular ceramics collection. The Southeast Asian Ceramics Museum. Source: Bangkok Post, 20150716 History of Asian ceramics Bangkok Post, 16 July 2015 Our van entered the Rangsit campus of Bangkok University and stopped in front of a sign for the Southeast Asian Ceramics Museum. After walking down a slight slope, the museum is revealed to resemble a partially underground kiln. Founded in 2000 and opened to the public in 2005, the museum is home to…
  • ISEAA award for early career Southeast Asian Archaeologists

    noelbynature
    19 Jul 2015 | 6:00 pm
    Nominations are being sought for an Early Career Research Award, open to recent PhD recipients in the field of Southeast Asian Archaeology. Deadline is 1 December 2015. The Institute for Southeast Asian Archaeology is pleased to announce the establishment of the first international award in the discipline of Southeast Asian archaeology. The ISEAA Early Career Award will be open to nominees who have defended their dissertations and received Ph.D. degrees within the five year period from August 31, 2010 to September 1, 2015. An award committee of distinguished scholars will select the awardee…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Publishing Archaeology

  • Academia.edu takes a step backward

    Michael E. Smith
    13 Jul 2015 | 8:59 am
    I have been using Academia.edu increasingly. I now post all of my current papers there, and sometimes for displacement activity I'll take a few minutes to post some older papers. There are more and more people on the service, and it has turned into a very useful resource. A few years ago I posted,   'How useful is Academia.edu?" My evaluation then was generally positive, with a few negative features. Since then, they have fixed a couple of the negative features, and others don't seem quite so serious now.It would be useful if all academics should set up a page on Academia.edu. I always…
  • World's worst book review?

    Michael E. Smith
    6 May 2015 | 6:38 pm
    A scholarly book review should do three things: (1) Describe the contents of the book. What is the book about, and what does it cover?  (2) Describe the scholarly context of the book. Where does the book fit within the literature, how does it relate to other works in terms of data, theory, or methods, etc. and, (3) Evaluate the book critically. I've written a lot about book reviews in this blog; for an overview, see my earliest such post.I have just read what may be the worst book review I have ever seen. I'll keep this anonymous to protect the guilty. Scholar A is reviewing an edited…
  • Bad revisonist history: The postprocessualists invented household archaeology!

    Michael E. Smith
    4 Apr 2015 | 5:04 pm
    I was quite surprised recently to read that postprocessualists were responsible for developing the household archaeology approach. This is so wrong that I'm not sure where to start. I was reading William Fowler's introduction to a special section of the journal Ancient Mesoamerica (vol 25, no. 2, 2014, pp. 367-68). The section is called "Households make history in ancient Mesoamerica. Some of the articles are pretty good, and some are pretty bad.After reviewing some aspects of postprocessual archaeology in an approving tone, Fowler states: "It should be clear by now why a true focus on…
  • Archaeological concepts of community confront urban realities today

    Michael E. Smith
    22 Feb 2015 | 3:30 pm
    Yesterday I spent my Saturday at a meeting of the Phoenix organization, "Neighborhoods Connect." The goal was to gather together neighborhood organizers and others interested in improving social life in Phoenix neighborhoods, to share experiences and examples of successful practices. The impetus for this first stakeholders meeting was to increase civic participation within the city of Phoenix. The State of Arizona has low levels of civic participation compared to other states, and the Neighborhoods Connect initiative grew out of several organizations  to improve civic participation,…
  • Is archaeology relevant? Is "relevance" irrelevant?

    Michael E. Smith
    14 Feb 2015 | 10:29 am
    The topic of relevance seems to be cropping up more frequently in archaeology. Our findings from the past are claimed to be relevant to contemporary concerns. I have no quibble with this viewpoint (Smith 2010), and indeed, my urban blog, Wide Urban World, is based on this premise. But the way the topic of relevance is used by most archaeologists today seems off the mark. The typical format is to assert, with little context or warrant, that some particular archaeological findings are relevant to some modern concern. This is usually done in an archaeology or anthropology journal, or other…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Middle Savagery

  • My Day of Archaeology: Meeting the US Ambassador

    colleenmorgan
    28 Jul 2015 | 5:50 am
    For the Day of Archaeology this year, I wrote up my experiences at the US Ambassador’s House talking about Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics), including my archaeology photo in the “distractingly sexy” campaign: For more, read the entry at the Day of Archaeology webpage.    
  • Post-photography and Archaeology

    colleenmorgan
    21 Jul 2015 | 6:41 am
    Eron Rauch’ post-photography in video games: “This panorama is made up of screenshots of every player corpse I came across while I levelled up my character in World of Warcraft.” Last week I submitted my CAA paper, The Death (and Afterlife) of Archaeological Photography, for publication in the proceedings. It’s the second paper on photography and archaeology that I’ve submitted this month; the first was Archaeological Photography as Dangerous Supplement and covered the analog to digital transition, with some added content/semiotic analysis thrown in for good…
  • Pop-Up Archaeology Museums!

    colleenmorgan
    15 Jul 2015 | 5:41 am
    Florence Laino, one of our recent University of York Digital Heritage MSc graduates, has joined forced with L-P Archaeology in creating a Pop-Up Museum for the 100 Minories site near the tower of London. You may remember that Dan & I were involved in early testing at the site. L-P Archaeology had a previous pop-up museum, HIPUM on Hayling Island. We had a chance to check out the Pop-Up Museum a couple of weeks ago, and they’ve done an impressive job with temporary displays with finds from the site. The site was in the London city ditch, so all manner of artifacts came out of it.
  • Why on Earth Would You Read an Archaeology Blog?

    colleenmorgan
    13 Jul 2015 | 4:14 am
    Fleur Schinning (pictured above) is a masters student at Leiden University who is studying archaeology blogs and impact. She has asked several archaeology bloggers to host her questionnaire so she can gain insight in how blogs and social media can improve the accessibility of archaeology. Has Middle Savagery made a small, crater-like impact into your cranium? Or are archaeology blogs for the birds? G’on, take a few minutes to fill it out. You even have a chance to win six issues of Archaeology Magazine: http://goo.gl/forms/z3BAUTyYUL  
  • Do you still use Film Photography in Archaeology? (update)

    colleenmorgan
    25 Jun 2015 | 4:04 am
    Five years ago I posted a poll regarding digital vs film photography in archaeology. I’m finally publishing a lot of my writing about photography (I know, I know!) and I’d like an update on this poll. Take Our Poll Please take a moment to fill it out & share!  
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Looting Matters

  • Aboutaam on the seized sarcophagi

    David Gill
    27 Jul 2015 | 2:13 pm
    Ali Aboutaam of Phoenix Ancient Art has commented on the lifting of sequestration of a Phoenician sarcophagus (Laure Lugon Zugravu, "Levée du séquestre pour le sarcophage phénicien", Le Temps July 22, 2015). Aboutaam is reported to have said that the Lebanon has now accepted that the sarcophagus had not been stolen.This was one of three sarcophagi seized in the Geneva Freeport in 2010.For earlier comments and video see here. | |
  • Sekhemka statue developments

    David Gill
    27 Jul 2015 | 1:16 am
    The BBC is reporting that British Prime Minister David Cameron has been asked to intervene in the Sekhemka statue situation ("Sekhemka statue export: PM David Cameron urged to "intervene"", BBC News July 26, 2015). It looks as if the export restriction is likely to be lifted this week.A statement has been issued by the Save Sekhemka Action Group.
  • The so-called Gospel of Jesus' Wife

    David Gill
    23 Jul 2015 | 7:19 am
    Professor Steve Walton had a very helpful post on the so-called Gospel of Jesus' Wife. This includes an interview with Dr Simon Gathercole from the University of Cambridge. The video explains the process in identifying the creation of a new document and its corrupting influence.For some of my earlier comments see here.
  • The (fictional) Detectorists in Suffolk

    David Gill
    22 Jul 2015 | 1:20 pm
    Earlier today I attended a meeting of a number of heritage organisations from across the region. Every so often a member of the 'Detectorists' cast wandered outside the windows on their way to make up or catering. Clearly this 'comedy' relating to the search for portable antiquities in Suffolk is preparing for a second series.
  • Operation Chronos in Essex

    David Gill
    20 Jul 2015 | 10:39 am
    The police in Essex have announced the launch of Operation Chronos to combat what is described as nighthawking in the county (Will Lodge, "Essex Police leads national campaign targeting illegal treasure hunters", EADT July 20, 2015).Assistant Chief Constable Julia Wortley, Essex Police lead on territorial policing, said: “So-called nighthawkers might think they’re no different to people who go metal-detecting for a hobby, but their actions damage the countryside, threaten our heritage and lead to the loss of important and invaluable national artefacts simply to satisfy the greed of a…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Theoretical Structural Archaeology

  • Deconstructing a Stonehenge "House"

    Geoff Carter
    18 Jul 2015 | 4:49 pm
    A game of blind house detectiveWhen a reader contacted me to ask my opinion on a reconstruction that was referred to as “the Stonehenge House”, I saw an interesting opportunity for a blind test.  In truth, I had not looked at this, so I requested and received a copy of the archaeological plan from Durrington Walls on which the reconstruction was based. I fully expected to produce a different conclusion since, as an archaeologist, I try to work by deduction, rather than by comparison or projection; it's the difference between astronomy and astrology.I sent my reply back in just…
  • Parish Notices: An exciting new blog, a Blogging Survey with a * Prize * + the future in the Stars

    Geoff Carter
    12 Jul 2015 | 6:03 pm
    An exciting new blog to visitFor some time I have been discussing some interesting research with Michael Carter of Ryerson University; He has been working on a project to utilise modern graphics engines to build virtual Native longhouses. This site gives a run-down on development of the research;www.theskonkworks.comIn particular the current state of the project:http://theskonkworks.com/2015/06/longhouse-3-0/This research touches on a many issues central to the use of modern computer graphics in the realisation of the past.  For my part, I am obliged by the limitation of deductive…
  • Understanding Hadrian's Wall - why it all went wrong

    Geoff Carter
    24 May 2015 | 2:25 am
    What's the big idea?It is roughly 270 years since a government in Westminster had Hadrian’s Wall systematically demolished and crushed to make the road that now brings the tourists to see the bits they missed.  It helped create a vast fragmentary jigsaw puzzle that which has proved difficult to piece together.In 2008, I recognised that my colleagues and others had discovered, under the streets of Tyneside, the remains of a temporary timber rampart predating the stone Wall.  This observation explained the strategic methodology of Wall construction, shed light on the…
  • Building the Past - in Ohio

    Geoff Carter
    30 Apr 2015 | 8:38 am
    I have been blogging about the archaeology of structures for nearly 7 years, during which Google tells me I have a little over half a million page views; some of this self-selecting audience get in touch and we take things further.One such was Bill Kennedy; we share an interest in modelling  archaeological structures from their foundations, only he builds full scale Prehistoric Native American structures at Sun Watch nr. Dayton, while I like mine to fit on my drawing board or hard disc.So, at Bill’s instigation, we have written a chapter together in Building the Past: Prehistoric…
  • Imaginary woods

    Geoff Carter
    13 Mar 2015 | 1:30 pm
    Often, when we think about the past, we do so in our imaginations, using the pictures and impressions we have picked from our shared visual culture, we mix the real things we find into a fantasy world.  Envisioning the environment in terms of its familiar topography and plants does not present much of a problem, domestic animals are bits hazier, but most of the things that made up the fabric of life just don’t survive here in our damp climate.  However, even trees in the picture may not be clear, the focus of archaeology is on tools, seldom extending to a consideration of the…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Stone Pages Archaeo News

  • 4,000-year-old structure found in Ohio

    27 Jul 2015 | 1:34 am
    A team led by Brian Redmond of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History is excavating a 4,000-year-old site in northeastern Ohio. So far, they have uncovered a 75-millimetre-thick floor made...
  • Bronze Age gold spirals discovered in Denmark

    27 Jul 2015 | 1:32 am
    Archaeologists have uncovered a trove of some 2,000 gold spirals dating from between 900 and 700 BCE. The spirals were recovered from a site that had been excavated before, when...
  • Oldest dentistry found in 14,000-year-old tooth

    24 Jul 2015 | 6:41 am
    An international study led by Stefano Benazzi, a palaeo-anthropologist at the University of Bologna, reveals that infected tooth belonging to a man about 25 years of age who lived in...
  • Norwegian iron helped build Iron Age Europe

    24 Jul 2015 | 6:38 am
    Iron production started about 3500 years ago in Asia Minor. In Norway, people have been producing iron for at least 2300 years. Arne Espelund, a professor emeritus and a mining...
  • New geoglyphs found in Peru

    24 Jul 2015 | 6:34 am
    Anthropologists at Yamagata University have discovered 24 examples of the mysterious Nazca Lines in the arid region of southern Peru. The team began investigating the northern slopes of the urban...
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Archaeology News Network

  • Ancient carriage way discovered near Athens

    21 Jul 2015 | 8:30 am
    A 300-metre section of an ancient carriage way dated to the 4th century BC was discovered by archaeologists at the Megalo Kavouri beach in the southern suburb of Vouliagmeni, the ministry of Culture announced on Monday. Section of the ancient carriage road discovered in Vouliagmeni [Credit: Greek Ministry of Culture]The road, paved with small stones placed close to one another, varies in width from 1.90 metres to 6.10 metres. It is... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Genetic studies link indigenous peoples in the Amazon and Australasia

    21 Jul 2015 | 7:30 am
    Native Americans living in the Amazon bear an unexpected genetic connection to indigenous people in Australasia, suggesting a previously unknown wave of migration to the Americas thousands of years ago, a new study has found. Brazil's Surui people share ancestry with indigenous Australians,  new evidence suggests [CreditL Paulo Whitaker/Reuters/Corbis]"It's incredibly surprising," said David Reich, Harvard Medical School... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Genome analysis pins down arrival and spread of first Americans

    21 Jul 2015 | 6:30 am
    The original Americans came from Siberia in a single wave no more than 23,000 years ago, at the height of the last Ice Age, and apparently hung out in the north -- perhaps for thousands of years -- before spreading in two distinct populations throughout North and South America, according to a new genomic analysis. The first Americans arrived in Alaska from Siberia less than 23,000 years ago  over a land bridge, called Beringia,... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Analysis confirms skeleton belongs to Philip II

    20 Jul 2015 | 12:30 pm
    Forty years after the bones of suspected royalty were found in Greece, experts have confirmed they belong to Alexander the Great's father, King Philip II. The left leg of an adult male skeleton found in Tomb I at Vergina. The thigh bone (femur)  and one of the bones of the lower leg (the tibia) are fused, and hole at the knee  suggests a devastating penetrating injury [Credit: Javier Trueba]Philip is known to have suffered a... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Waterfront construction unearths more than 100 Native American artefacts

    20 Jul 2015 | 11:30 am
    A $2.9 million project to improve waterfront access in the Bronx unearthed a priceless find — more than 100 pieces of Native American artifacts dating back to 200 AD. Selection of artefacts found in the southeastern section of Pelham Bay Park  [Credit: Chrysalis Archaeological Consultants, Inc.]Experts are calling the trove of ceramics, pottery, stone tools and other artifacts found in the southeastern section of Pelham Bay Park... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Mathisen Corollary

  • The Eight Pieces of Brocade (八段錦): "Riding Horse, Drawing Bow to Shoot Eagle"

    David Warner Mathisen
    25 Jul 2015 | 3:11 am
    When I was a young lieutenant in the 82nd Airborne Division, I purchased a book called The Kung Fu Exercise Book by Michael Minick, published in 1974.The book contains a series of exercises which it explains on page 9 are derived from the "Ancient Art Silk Weaving Exercises" and which the author says are part of a system which is far more than just exercise:The system I am going to describe is far more than just a pattern of exercises. It is an integral part of Chinese medicine. Traditional Chinese medicine's weapons against ill health are few in number, but they are extraordinarily…
  • The blindness of Dhritarastra, and Upamanyu at the bottom of the well

    David Warner Mathisen
    22 Jul 2015 | 1:50 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).The previous post and video discussing the ancient sacred text of the Bhagavad Gita explored its celestial foundation, showing that like the rest of the world's Star Myths it uses the majestic celestial cycles as an extended metaphor portraying the descent of each human soul into this incarnate life, an incarnate life which can be seen as a sort of "battlefield" characterized by the endless struggle or interplay between the material and spiritual realms (both within the individual and without).Immediately prior to Arjuna's descent into the battle of…
  • The Gospel of Philip and the Zodiac Wheel

    David Warner Mathisen
    14 Jul 2015 | 12:55 am
    images: Wikimedia commons link 1; link 2; link 3.The previous two posts have attempted to demonstrate that ancient texts buried beneath a cliff near modern-day Nag Hammadi, likely placed there during the second half of the fourth century AD after authorities promoting what can generally be called a literalist approach as opposed to a gnostic approach had declared these texts to be heretical and suppressed their teachings, can be shown to be using esoteric metaphors to convey the very same ancient wisdom found in other myth-systems the world over.In particular, the preceding posts argued…
  • The Gospel of Thomas and the Everlasting Spring

    David Warner Mathisen
    9 Jul 2015 | 2:14 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).We're currently engaged in an examination of some of the ancient texts found buried at the base of the Jabal al-Tarif near Nag Hammadi in Egypt, for evidence of teachings which resonate with the teachings conveyed by other Star Myths around the world.The previous post examined the Gospel of Thomas, found in Nag Hammadi codex 2, and argued that it is using a powerful esoteric metaphor to teach us that we are beings composed of two natures, that we are like a "set of twins," but contained within one being. We have our human, incarnate, doubting side -- but one…
  • The Gospel of Thomas and the Divine Twin

    David Warner Mathisen
    6 Jul 2015 | 3:08 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).Why was an entire "library" of ancient texts carefully sealed in a large storage jar at the base of the steep cliffs of the massif known today as the Jabal al-Tarif, along the banks of the Nile River in Egypt not far from the ancient city of Thebes, sometime during the second half of what we label today as the fourth century AD (the fourth century being the years in the 300s, since the first century AD consists of the years with numbers below 100, such as for example AD 60 or AD 70, causing all the subsequent centuries to have numbers "one higher" than the…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Doug's Archaeology

  • Linked Data: From interoperable to interoperating

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    27 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
    Today’s batch of videos come from CAA, the international conference, in Siena, Italy. I was privileged enough to be there and lucky that some session organisers and presenters agreed to let me film them. The first session up is about Linked Data: Linked Data and Semantic Web based approaches to data management have now become commonplace in the field of heritage. So commonplace in fact, that despite frequent mention in digital literature, and a growing familiarity with concepts such as URIs and RDF across the domain, it is starting to see fall off in Computer Science conferences and…
  • CAA-UK 2015, University of Bradford

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    22 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    Here are the videos from CAAUK in March. A bit about the conference- CAA-UK aims to encourage communication between UK-based archaeologists, mathematicians and computer scientists in order to stimulate research and promote best practice in computational and mathematical approaches to the past. The conference was held at Bradford University’s dedicated Norcroft Conference Centre. And the talks: Developing an integrated digital data workflow for the 100 Minories project John Layt L – P : Archaeology The 100 Minories project is a commercial excavation by LP archaeology of a site just to…
  • Students in Archaeology: Understanding and Engaging the Next Generation of Archaeologists

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    21 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    Another batch of videos from TAG. I know, 7 months late. You may want to book mark this page because the discuss at the end of these videos are pretty great. Hope you enjoy and here is what the session was about: Session organiser: David Altoft Students are essential to the development of archaeology, today as well as in the future. Understanding this formative demographic is important for allowing us to comprehend the current foundations of archaeological theory and practice and how those will develop under future generations of archaeologists. This session will critically ask what the…
  • Inclusivity and the Pedagogy of Archaeology

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    20 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    This post is from the TAG conference back in December. Apologies for not getting this up sooner. Been a very busy year. Some info on the session: Session organisers: Katy Bell (University of Winchester) and Ellen McInnes (University of Manchester) “If you have decided to become an archaeologist you will need a reasonable education in archaeology” (http://archaeology.about.com/od/gettingtraining/) begins one career advice website. In this session we will argue that the pedagogy of archaeology goes beyond the practice of preparing the archaeologists of the future. As an inclusive discipline…
  • Archaeological Research in Progress 2015

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    19 Jul 2015 | 3:12 pm
    I had a little free time this weekend so I have cracked out a few posts and put them into the queue. All video related but I have been making quite a few recently and have not had a chance to share them here. So to begin with, the Archaeological Research in Progress conference, held in Edinburgh this last May. (Re)discovering the Gaulcross Hoard and other early medieval silver Burnswark: Siege or no Siege? The trigger for the demise of an eighteenth century drovers’ inn Wiggle-match dating Scottish crannogs New Evidence for Iron Age Burial Practice in the Western Isles Middle Iron Age…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    AntiquityNOW

  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! Celebrate National Lasagna Day With Eggplant Lasagna Rollups

    AntiquityNOW
    29 Jul 2015 | 2:48 am
    Today is National Lasagna Day and it is a holiday that begs to be celebrated in a big way. Of course, if you’re vegan or gluten-free, you’re probably running as fast as you can from the festivities. AntiquityNOW to the … Continue reading →
  • The Slavery Project Part 3: In the Eye of the Beholder

    AntiquityNOW
    28 Jul 2015 | 2:00 am
    As we discussed in Parts 1 and 2 of In the Eye of the Beholder, The Slavery Project (TSP) is an ongoing, interactive series of modules that incorporates lesson plans along select historical plot lines detailing slavery in a particular society during a … Continue reading →
  • Don’t Miss the Next AntiquityNOW Newsletter!

    AntiquityNOW
    24 Jul 2015 | 2:00 am
    You’re busy. We understand! So, we’ve made it easier than ever for you to keep up with AntiquityNOW. Subscribe to our email newsletter and occasional updates and you’ll never miss another insightful blog post, new curriculum for the classroom, free bookmark, … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! Ham ‘n Hay With Beer

    AntiquityNOW
    22 Jul 2015 | 2:00 am
    Today’s recipe is everything we’ve come to love from Bon Appetit Wednesday: unique, ancient, mysterious, healthy and delicious. Hay may not be the first thing that comes to mind when you think of cooking a ham, but you might want … Continue reading →
  • KIDS’ BLOG! The Rose in History: Power, Beauty and the Sweet Smell (and Taste) of Success

    AntiquityNOW
    21 Jul 2015 | 2:02 am
    Roses have an ancient history. Their delicate petals, their beautiful hues, their enticing fragrances and their visual presence has inspired civilizations from time immemorial. Roses have been around for some 35 million years and evidence of their past glories have been found in … Continue reading →
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica

  • Audio News for July 19 to 25, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    27 Jul 2015 | 10:06 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Israeli hunter-gatherer site bears very early evidence of cultivation on the Sea of Galilee (details) New study brings fresh evidence of Philip of Macedon’s final resting place (details) Specialized analysis of Dead Sea Scrolls uncovers an early chapter of Leviticus (details) Maya monument connected to prolonged city-state Cold War (details)
  • Audio News for July 12 to 18, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    20 Jul 2015 | 9:35 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Viking burial weapons may link to King Canute’s invasion of England (details) Texas highway work finds Caddo villages (details) Famed protest camp in Nevada yields archaeological insights (details) Traces of early Indian port found in Goa (details)
  • Audio News for July 5 to 11, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    13 Jul 2015 | 10:02 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Archaeologists discover a second shipwreck from Kublai Khan’s failed 13th century invasion of Japan (details) French town of Arles holds rare Roman fresco comparable to Pompeii (details) New geoglyph discoveries add to the Nazca Lines site in Peru (details) South Dakota village features carbonized plant remains from a millennium ago (details)
  • Audio News for June 28 to July 4, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    6 Jul 2015 | 10:22 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Sacred bobcat burial in Illinois (details) Funnel beaker fingerprint traces ancient farmers on Denmark's coast (details) New Angkor Wat dig sheds light on ordinary lives and households (details) Kazakhstan burial shows arrow wound to spine (details)
  • Audio News for June 21 to 27, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    29 Jun 2015 | 11:25 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Community archaeology program in Chicago explores a Civil War training and prison camp (details) CT scan of a Swedish mummified bishop reveals some surprises from the 17th century (details) Swiss archaeologists may have found a famous 14th-century battlefield (details) Oldest human footprints in North America discovered on British Columbia coast (details)
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    NOSAS Archaeology Blog

  • Why do you read this blog?

    nosas
    13 Jul 2015 | 3:51 pm
    No archaeology in this post I’m afraid. Instead a request to participate in some interesting research on behalf of a master’s student from Leiden University. Fleur Schinning is conducting research into the reasons why people read archaeological blogs, with a view to seeing whether they improve the accessibility of the subject. She has created a short online questionnaire at http://goo.gl/forms/z3BAUTyYUL. You can preview the questionnaire in pdf form here. Participants are promised the chance to win 6 copies of Archaeology Magazine. We will also have the chance to see the…
  • Finding the Kinrara Bobbin Mill

    nosas
    8 Jul 2015 | 4:25 pm
    by Ann Wakeling (NOSAS) A long time ago Meryl Marshall sent me a picture of some old wooden sheds which might have been workshops, and some houses, situated in scattered birch woodland. The caption had ‘Kinrara Bobbin Mill’, did I know where it was? Checking the HER (MHG 23895) produced a Bobbin Mill with a grid ref NH 8700 0800, on Kinrara Estate. This is the intersection of grid lines meaning the site should be somewhere in that kilometer square. Most of the square is taken up by Tor Alvie, a steep sided hill, not very promising for an industrial site, the low ground is…
  • Cromarty Medieval Burgh Excavations 2014

    nosas
    27 Jun 2015 | 7:55 am
    by Mary Peteranna (AOC) Excavations to the north of Thief’s Row 2014 Our excavations in 2014 produced more informative data to assist with our research into the history of the Burgh of Cromarty including a more detailed picture of the layout and phasing of the buildings along each side of Thief’s Row, where our main excavation site is located (see a history of Thief’s Row) This includes the footings of three buildings shown on the 1880 Ordnance Survey map sheet on the north side of Thief’€™s Row, under which we identified the remains of another earlier structure,…
  • Rubh’ an Dunain, Skye: 8000 Years of History

    nosas
    23 Jun 2015 | 4:37 pm
    by Martin Wildgoose Aerial view of the Rubh’ an Dunain peninsula Members of NOSAS walking towards the tackman’s house on Rubh’ an Dunain. Canna is on the skyline. A warm sunny Sunday in early June saw NOSAS members gathering in the Glenbrittle campsite, at the foot of the Cuillin Mountains. The view south was spectacular, Canna seemed unusually close and South Uist and Barra lay in the haze on the horizon. Close at hand the Rubha an Dunain peninsular stretched out to the left of the bay with a ribbon of made-up path promising an easy walk to the point where 8000 years of…
  • Lament for a once Magical Place – or “the Agony of a severely traumatised pair of Archaeological Sites”

    nosas
    9 May 2015 | 3:20 pm
    by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS) This is the story of two archaeological sites which have suffered severe damage through a catalogue of assaults by man in the name of “development”. The “patients”, for so they can be regarded, lie in Balblair Wood (read Ward!), near Beauly. They have received repeated injuries over the last 20 years and today are in a sad, sorry state – they have been in the wrong place at the wrong time! Patient A is (or was) an extensive linear prehistoric site, centred on NGR NH 501444; it once comprised 13 hut circles, 2 chambered cairns, burnt mounds and a field…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    eaglesanddragonspublishing.com

  • Pythagoras’ Golden Verses – For a Good Life

    AdamAH
    27 Jul 2015 | 6:32 pm
    There has been a lot of negativity in the news these past weeks, mostly directed at Greece and Greek people. Many comments, including from high-profile public personages, have been outright prejudiced. Don’t worry. I’m not going to get into politics, who’s right, and who’s wrong, and how only the bankers seem to be winning anything. Ok, I slipped there. Sorry. With all the hatred and vitriol floating around the Web, I needed to go back to something uplifting, something ancient. I went back to a bit of research I had done on Pythagoras and the Golden Verses. These are a series of…
  • Ancient Everyday – Time for a Bath

    AdamAH
    21 Jul 2015 | 6:02 pm
    Showering, bathing and generally keeping clean is something that we take for granted today. For most people, washing is part of the daily routine. If you look at the Middle Ages, this was not the case. In fact, medieval people were pretty filthy. This isn’t surprising as bathing was considered a sin by many. This wasn’t the case for ancient Romans, thank the gods. As we do today, the Romans bathed and washed regularly, and as with going to the toilet, bathing was yet another very social activity for Romans. Throughout the Roman Empire, public and private baths were common, owing something…
  • Tiryns: Mycenaean Stronghold and Place of Legend

    AdamAH
    5 Jul 2015 | 9:51 am
    This week, I wanted to leave behind the sad and depressing subject of the destruction of heritage to write about a site steeped in myth and legend – Tiryns. “In the south-eastern corner of the plain of Argos, on the west and lowest and flattest of those rocky heights which here form a group, and rise like islands from the marshy plain, at a distance of 8 stadia, or about 1500 m. from the Gulf of Argos, lay the prehistoric citadel of Tiryns, now called Palaeocastron.” (Heinrich Schliemann; Tiryns; 1885) I visited the site with family during the summer of 2002. It was a scorcher…
  • Preserving the Past – Some Thoughts on the Importance of Historic Places

    AdamAH
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:54 pm
    I’m talking about something a bit more personal for this post. Recently, I went back to my home town with my family. We were in the area and so we thought it might be fun to take a drive through the old neighbourhood. It’s kind of weird passing by primary and secondary schools where you spent so much time, and then happily pushed them from your mind. All that feel like another life. Our last stop was the last house my family owned. It was the oldest house in the area (over 100 years old), and belonged to the original landowner who had settled the area. This is a picture of the house: As…
  • The Links Between History and Mythology – A Guest Post by Luciana Cavallaro

    AdamAH
    22 Jun 2015 | 6:15 pm
    Today I have a special guest on the blog. Luciana Cavallaro is the author of a series of mythological retellings from the perspectives of some fascinating women in Greek myth. When I read her book, The Curse of Troy, I knew that I wanted to have her write a guest post for Writing the Past. Luciana has a wonderfully unique style, and she gives these accursed women of Greek myth a voice that you may not have heard before. So, without further ado, a big welcome to author, Luciana Cavallaro! First, I’d like to thank Adam for inviting me to be a guest blogger. I’ve been following Adam’s blog…
 
Log in