Archaeology

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Shang oracle bones: more evidence of humanity's shared shamanic heritage

    The Mathisen Corollary
    David Warner Mathisen
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:16 pm
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).Numerous previous posts, including"Humanity's shared shamanic heritage""The shamanic foundation of the world's ancient wisdom"and"The centrality of ecstasy, according to ancient wisdom"have advanced the position that what may be broadly termed the shamanic worldview belongs as a precious inheritance to all the world's people, and can be conclusively demonstrated to be the foundation of the nearly every ancient sacred tradition on our planet.This thesis would include those cultures whose scriptures and sacred traditions are built upon the common system of…
  • The celestial fire

    The Mathisen Corollary
    David Warner Mathisen
    28 Feb 2015 | 1:45 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).The Bibles of antiquity have but one theme: the incarnation. The vast body of ancient Scripture discoursed on but one subject -- the descent of souls, units of deific Mind, sons of God, into fleshly bodies developed by natural evolution on planets such as ours, therein to undergo an experience by which their continued growth through the ranges and planes of expanding consciousness might be carried forward to ever higher grades of divine being.    -- Alvin Boyd Kuhn, Esoteric Structure of the Alphabet and Its Hidden Mystical Language. 20.The world…
  • Clava Type Cairns of the Inverness Area

    NOSAS Archaeology Blog
    nosas
    1 Feb 2015 | 1:01 pm
    by Anne Coombs (NOSAS) Clava cairns are unique to a small area of Eastern Highlands of Scotland.  Identified originally along the valley of the River Nairn, a good start point for any tour of these sites is at Balnuaran of Clava near Culloden. Here Historic Scotland cares for a well preserved group of three circular burial cairns in a small area with a car park and interpretation panels (see the H.S. leaflet). Surrounded by trees beside the river this location can provide an atmospheric even ‘sacred’ sense of the past, especially at mid-winter or in the spring.  Two small chambered…
  • Reconstructing the Deskford Iron-Age carnyx

    Archaeology News from Past Horizons
    Past Horizons
    2 Mar 2015 | 9:41 am
    The Deskford carnyx is the head of an Iron Age trumpet, found in the north-east of Scotland around 1816. It is a masterpiece of early Celtic art, shaped to resemble a wild boar. In 1992 a replica was made by metalsmith John Creed. Related posts: Findings indicate ritual destruction of Iron Age warriors Eggs of intestinal parasites identified in Late Iron Age site Danish Iron Age village to be re-born Chariot fittings unearthed at Iron-Age hillfort An Iron Age room with a view
  • The International Brigades Archaeology Project - September 1-15, 2015

    ArchaeologyOnline: Archaeological Information on the Web
    Anita
    18 Feb 2015 | 6:50 am
    English: Memorial plate for international brigade from London to the Spanish civil war. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) The International Brigades Archaeology Project (IBAP) is studying the sites of the Spanish Civil War in Spain. In 1937, the 15th International Brigade, including the Abraham Lincoln, British, and MacKenzie-Papineau Battalions, was heavily involved in a fierce battle for the small
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    ArchaeologyOnline: Archaeological Information on the Web

  • The International Brigades Archaeology Project - September 1-15, 2015

    Anita
    18 Feb 2015 | 6:50 am
    English: Memorial plate for international brigade from London to the Spanish civil war. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) The International Brigades Archaeology Project (IBAP) is studying the sites of the Spanish Civil War in Spain. In 1937, the 15th International Brigade, including the Abraham Lincoln, British, and MacKenzie-Papineau Battalions, was heavily involved in a fierce battle for the small
  • Valcamonica Rock Art and Archaeology Fieldwork & Fieldschool

    Anita
    17 Feb 2015 | 2:29 pm
    From July 16 to August 6 2015 the annual archaeology field school at Paspardo will be open to archaeologists, scholars, students and enthusiasts. This area gives a great opportunity to learn, survey, photograph, draw and catalogue the rock engravings. The program involves field research, documentation, tracing, guided visits and lectures. Fieldwork is organised by Footsteps of Man, Valcamonica.
  • Mount Vernon 2014 Collaborative Historic Preservation Field School May 27- July 3

    Anita
    22 Feb 2014 | 8:23 am
    George Washington’s Mount Vernon, located near Washington, DC, is the historic site dedicated to interpreting the life of the first president within the context of his home and plantation.  The 2014 Mount Vernon/University of Maryland (UMD) Field School in Historic Preservation is in the second year of a multi-year project to explore the archaeological, architectural, and interpretive
  • Strawbery Banke Museum Archaeology Field School 2014

    Anita
    22 Feb 2014 | 8:02 am
    Strawbery Banke Museum (Photo credit: Selbe B) The Strawbery Banke Museum Archaeology Department is pleased to announce its 18th Annual Archaeological Field School! June 23 - July 25, 2014, Monday - Friday 8:30am - 4pm Strawbery Banke Museum is an outdoor living history museum located in historic Portsmouth, NH. Strawbery Banke archaeologists have conducted some of the largest urban
  • Archaeology Field School at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

    Anita
    22 Feb 2014 | 8:00 am
    Portland State University, Washington State University Vancouver, and the National Park Service are pleased to announce a field school in historical archaeology at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. The program will introduce the method and theory of fieldwork in historical archaeology. Students will participate in all aspects of field and laboratory work: laying out units, excavation by
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine

  • Mercury in Ancient Fish Bones Linked to Rising Seas

    3 Mar 2015 | 2:30 pm
    KING SALMON, ALASKA—Alaska Dispatch News reports that the bones of cod recovered from a coastal archaeological site on Mink Island in Katmai National Park and Preserve contain high levels of toxic mercury. It is thought that the flesh of the fish, eaten by the people who lived at the site between 4,000 and 5,000 years ago, would have had significantly higher levels of the contaminant. The bones date to the early and mid-Holocene, when the climate was warming and rising seas were inundating the Bering Land Bridge and naturally occurring mercury in the dry or frozen land was dispersed into…
  • 18th-Dynasty Tomb Discovered in Luxor

    3 Mar 2015 | 2:00 pm
    CAIRO, EGYPT—A tomb dating to the 18th Dynasty has been discovered by a team from the American Research Center in the Gorna necropolis on Luxor’s west bank. The t-shaped tomb has two large halls and an unfinished small niche at one end. A side room has a shaft that “could lead to the burial chamber,” Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh el-Damaty told Ahram Online. The walls of the tomb, which was looted and damaged in antiquity, are decorated with paintings of hunting scenes and images of the tomb’s owner, a guard of Amun’s gate, and his wife in front of an offering table. Some of the…
  • Shallow 17th-Century Grave Unearthed in Oxford

    3 Mar 2015 | 1:30 pm
    OXFORD, ENGLAND—The remains of a young woman were unearthed from a shallow grave in an area designated for gardens and buildings on historic maps. A Charles I silver shilling found near her shoulder is thought to have been placed on her eyes before she was put in a burial shroud held in place with pins. The coin was struck at the Tower Mint in 1640 or 1641 and suggests that the woman may have come from a prosperous family, but finding the remains of a wealthy person of the period buried outside a cemetery is highly unusual. “At present we have one young adult female burial that…
  • Lost City Found in Honduran Rainforest

    3 Mar 2015 | 1:06 pm
    FORT COLLINS, COLORADO—An international team of researchers, working with the Honduran government and its Institute of Anthropology and History, used Lidar technology to search La Mosquitia, an unexplored rain forest in eastern Honduras, famous for being the location of the legendary “White City,” or “City of the Monkey God.” Man-made ruins were spotted and confirmed by a team on the ground. “Through this amazing project we were able to use Lidar as a tool of discovery that resulted in the discovery of a lost world. We hope to continue this work in the future to more fully unravel…
  • Alaska Landslide Reveals Stone Hammer

    2 Mar 2015 | 2:30 pm
    SITKA, ALASKA—Landslides in the Starrigavan Valley last year brought a prehistoric stone tool that may have been used to drive wedges and split wood to the surface. Forest Service hydrologists Marty Becker and KK Prussian were assessing the damage in the slide area when Becker found the piece of rock. “And I noticed it felt real comfortable in my hand. Like it just fit perfectly. I brushed it off, took a closer look, and realized what it was,” he told KTOO News. The handmaul is missing one arm of its usual “T” shape. “My guess is that it would have been used for harvesting cedar.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek

  • Strata: Portraits of Humanity features imaging the invisible and more

    Rick Pettigrew
    16 Feb 2015 | 12:09 pm
    Friends and colleagues: You can see two fascinating features in the February 2015 edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV: * Christian Ris explains the story of archaeology, its challenges and major advances in a narrative style with numerous archived images. People always have been interested in our past, but only since the Nineteenth Century has archaeology become a recognized science. * Using black light and intricate exploitation of digital photography, the walls of the catacombs of Kom el-Shougafa in Alexandria, the mummies of the Taklamakan Desert in China…
  • Strata: Portraits of Humanity features Roman soldier’s tombstone and more

    Rick Pettigrew
    15 Jan 2015 | 11:56 am
    Friends and colleagues: You can see three fascinating features in the January 2015 edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV: * In a short animated film, a small boy discovers an ancient grave by accident and witnesses its looting and destruction. * After 3 years soaking in a tank filled with a preservative solution, the 1,100 year old Native American dugout canoe excavated in 2011 from Florida’s Weedon Island Preserve has taken a big step closer to going on public display. * A Roman soldier’s gravestone excavated in 2003 inspires young UK cadets to design a…
  • ALI seeks match for a $10,000 gift

    Rick Pettigrew
    14 Jan 2015 | 10:09 am
    Please spread this word as widely as you can.  ALI produces The Archaeology Channel as well as ArchaeoSeek and much more. An anonymous donor at the beginning of 2015 contributed $10,000 to ALI to support our public outreach efforts and cultural heritage programming. This donor is willing to continue making such contributions, but only if we can raise matching funds to increase our level of basic cash support. If we can raise $10,000 in new contributions (meaning donations, Membership contributions or Underwriting contributions from new sources or in increased amounts from existing sources)…
  • Visit Turkey and see a Florida shipwreck on Strata: Portraits of Humanity

    Rick Pettigrew
    16 Dec 2014 | 9:05 am
    Friends and colleagues: Take a tour of Turkey’s Anatolia region and inspect a Florida shipwreck in the December edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV. In this episode we highlight eastern and southeastern Anatolia in Turkey,which has great scenic beauty and is an archaeological wonderland with clear traces of many civilizations. It includes Mt. Nimrud, with a massive burial mound and monumental statues placed at the summit 2000 years ago. Also this time, we see the 2011 excavations on the English China Shipwreck in Biscayne National Park, Florida, where the…
  • Descend into Roman mines in Spain on Strata: Portraits of Humanity

    Rick Pettigrew
    17 Nov 2014 | 11:24 am
    Friends and colleagues: Descend into Roman mines in northern Spain in the November edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV.In this episode we present “Metalla Oiassonis,” a film from Felix Ugarte Elkartea of Spain introducing us to the complex world of the ancient mining that the Romans developed at the ancient port city of Oiasso, located within the modern city today named Irun in Spanish and Gipuzkoa in Basque, in Spain near the French border.  In the western foothills of the Pyrenees and the next to the Bay of Biscay stands the granite massif called Aiako…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog

  • Myanmar’s archaeology department calls for help with restoring Bagan murals

    noelbynature
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:22 pm
    Myanmar’s Department of Archaeology and the National Library is making an open call for the public to help preserve the murals of Bagan. For starters, it means that visitors should not physically touch them! Ananda Temple in Bagan. Source: TTR Weekly 20150302 Bagan murals need restoring TTR Weekly, 02 March 2015 Myanmar’s Department of Archaeology, National Museum and Library has called on the public to pitch in and help to preserve hand-painted murals in temples near Bagan. The department’s deputy general director, Thein Lwin, told Irrawaddy media that the department, works under…
  • International diplomats visit Phu Phra Bat

    noelbynature
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:16 pm
    The Thai government hosted a visit to the Phu Phra Bat Historical Park for diplomatic guests to raise support for its bid to put the park into the Unesco World Heritage register. Phu Phra Bat visit. Source: The Nation 20150302 Rocks of worship The Nation, 02 March 2015 The Culture Ministry takes diplomats, art experts and the press to Phu Phrabat Historical Park, recently nominated for World Heritage Site status Since its nomination by the Thai Culture Ministry to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation’s World Heritage head office in Paris at the beginning…
  • Hindu temple in Java to be restored

    noelbynature
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:03 pm
    Candi Sukuh in Central Java, noted for the pyramid structure of the central building, is slated for conservation later this year. Candi Sukuh. Source: Jakarta Globe 20150130 Collapsing Pyramid at the Hindu Temple of Sukuh to Be Restored by 2016 Jakarta Globe, 30 January 2015 The Central Java Heritage Conservation Agency plans to restore the Hindu temple, known as Sukuh, this March as the earth beneath the temple’s foundation continues to shift. Some parts of the exotic temple complex will remain open to tourists during the renovations, but not the main pyramid-shaped structure. The agency…
  • Profile of John Guy of the Met

    noelbynature
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:50 am
    A profile of Dr John Guy, curator of South and Southeast Asian Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. John Guy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Source: The Hindu 20150214 A detective across centuries The Hindu, 14 February 2015 The remarkable object on the screen is one of these clues — a yupa stone found in Eastern Borneo that dates back to the fourth century AD. The Sanskrit inscription describes the sacrifices performed by a local king called Mulawarman. “The inscription is in grammatical, perfectly good Sanskrit,” says John Guy, while delivering the Vasant J. Sheth…
  • The Thang Long Citadel

    noelbynature
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:32 am
    A Xinhua feature on the Thang Long Citadel in Hanoi. Thang Long Imperial Citadel stands as historical testament to Vietnam’s power center Xinhua, via Global Post, 27 February 2015 The Thang Long Imperial Citadel, located at the heart of Vietnam’s capital city Hanoi, has borne witness to the long history of the country as it has been a continuous seat of political power for almost thirteen centuries. The Thang Long (Ascending Dragon) Imperial Citadel was built in the 11th century by the Vietnamese Ly Dynasty (1010-1225), to mark the independence of the Dai Viet, as Vietnam was…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Publishing Archaeology

  • Archaeological concepts of community confront urban realities today

    Michael E. Smith
    22 Feb 2015 | 3:30 pm
    Yesterday I spent my Saturday at a meeting of the Phoenix organization, "Neighborhoods Connect." The goal was to gather together neighborhood organizers and others interested in improving social life in Phoenix neighborhoods, to share experiences and examples of successful practices. The impetus for this first stakeholders meeting was to increase civic participation within the city of Phoenix. The State of Arizona has low levels of civic participation compared to other states, and the Neighborhoods Connect initiative grew out of several organizations  to improve civic participation,…
  • Is archaeology relevant? Is "relevance" irrelevant?

    Michael E. Smith
    14 Feb 2015 | 10:29 am
    The topic of relevance seems to be cropping up more frequently in archaeology. Our findings from the past are claimed to be relevant to contemporary concerns. I have no quibble with this viewpoint (Smith 2010), and indeed, my urban blog, Wide Urban World, is based on this premise. But the way the topic of relevance is used by most archaeologists today seems off the mark. The typical format is to assert, with little context or warrant, that some particular archaeological findings are relevant to some modern concern. This is usually done in an archaeology or anthropology journal, or other…
  • 23 thousand citations

    Michael E. Smith
    8 Feb 2015 | 9:09 am
    My Endnote bibliography database has just passed 23,000 entries. The reference that pushed it over this level is:Hillier, Bill    1996    Space is the Machine: A Configurational Approach to Architecture. Cambridge University Press, New York.I decided to do a quick, almost certainly inaccurate, list of the top ten authors in my Endnote database. There is not a way to do this easily in Endnote, so I just thought of authors I know I have cited a lot over the years, or whose work I follow, and recorded how many entries I have for them as author. I found these eleven…
  • Archaeology in France and Germany

    Michael E. Smith
    21 Dec 2014 | 4:46 pm
    Roman amphitheater in ParisI just returned from a trip to Paris and Bonn. In Paris I sat on the dissertation defense committee of Marion Forest. Marion passed with highest honors. Her dissertation is a social-spatial analysis of sites on the Malpais de Zacapu in Michoacan, Mexico. This is a lava flow with several large, densely-packed settlements with extraordinary architectural preservation. Her dissertation is quite good, with lots of good spatial and architectural data, and some information on artifacts:Forest, Marion2014    L'organisation sociospatiale des agglomérations…
  • "Get me off your f_____ mailing list!"

    Michael E. Smith
    23 Nov 2014 | 3:51 pm
    I'm sure we have all had this sentiment, given the increase in garbage emails inviting us to attend bogus conferences and publish in bogus journals. Fed up with this, two authors created a paper that consists primarily of the phrase "Get me off your f_____ mailing list," repeated several hundred times. They submitted it to the journal, International Journal of Advanced Computer Technology, whose editor accepted the paper!! This is hilarious. See the nice discussion on Scolarly Open Access, and don't neglect to read the comments. There is also some discussion on IFL-Science and elsewhere.The…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Middle Savagery

  • Mornings in the Manor

    colleenmorgan
    2 Mar 2015 | 1:15 am
      It was all so new, a year ago, when I described the over and under and through of my commute to work, walking through a microcosm of English history. Now it passes in a blur, I’m either in my headphones listening to a podcast or buzzing by on my lovely Gazelle–the sturdy Danish bicycle that I steer over frozen cobblestones and muddy, overgrown pathways. I was delayed this morning by a brief flurry of snow, predicated by an Easter pink and yellow sky. I don’t notice my commute much, and a lot of the culture shock has worn off. Now I hear my previous self in other…
  • Where are the Female Contemporary Archaeologists?

    colleenmorgan
    19 Feb 2015 | 6:38 am
    Citational communities can be at turns fascinating, infuriating, and utterly destructive. Literature is easier than ever to search for, but there’s also an unholy amount of it out there–while I was finishing my thesis on digital archaeology I had to cut off my research references at 2011 or else be crushed under an unending tidal wave of words. It’s worse when you do very interdisciplinary work, and even worse when you move between two very large research communities, USA and Europe, and get reviewed by scholars from all over the world. I’m glad I don’t deal…
  • How Savage is Your Savagery?

    colleenmorgan
    16 Feb 2015 | 8:40 am
    After receiving some rather chilling feedback regarding the name of my blog, you know, Middle Savagery, I took a step back to think about it a little bit more. I thought it was obvious to everyone, that it was reclaiming an arcane, racist category for classifying ancient societies in a reflexive, anthropological way. I shouldn’t have assumed. While I had been blogging since 2001, I started my archaeology-based blog in 2004, after taking Sam Wilson’s excellent The Archaeology of Complex Societies class, wherein we had to directly address what complexity means. It was one of those…
  • Art, Archaeology, and Fonts at the Van Eyck

    colleenmorgan
    5 Feb 2015 | 12:03 am
    The Jan van Eyck Academie felt otherworldly, a precise, modern shadowbox surrounded by winding medieval streets. Artists wandered in and out of studios, only vaguely curious as to what a gaggle of archaeologists was doing at an art institute in Maastricht, Holland. I was almost too distracted to notice. I about to give the keynote lecture for the NEARCH meeting, on Archaeology and the Image, and navigating between the two audiences I would be addressing was making me nervous. Very prominent, senior academic archaeologists and cutting-edge contemporary artists would be hearing all about…
  • Digging for DNA on Medium.com

    colleenmorgan
    29 Jan 2015 | 8:30 am
    I’m very pleased with this long-form, popular article that I wrote: Digging for DNA: Archaeology, Genetics & the Transatlantic Slave Trade. I wasn’t sure where to put it at first, as it’s long for many journals, and a lot of places do not accept unsolicited manuscripts. Journalistic writing is surprisingly difficult to break into! It was also one of the more difficult things that I’ve written, as it details very contentious issues in research on ethnicity and genetics. While my name is on the byline, it received quite a few edits from the researchers…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Looting Matters

  • The Horiuchi sarcophagus returns to Italy

    David Gill
    2 Mar 2015 | 2:28 pm
    The Horiuchi SarcophagusThe US authorities have returned the Horiuchi Sarcophagus to Italy [press release].HSI New York returned six objects Wednesday including “sleeping beauty,” an ancient Roman marble sarcophagus lid of Sleeping Ariadne, which was smuggled out of Italy. TPC identified the object as part of a collection of suspected looted Italian antiquities belonging to a known trafficker who was involved in trafficking archeological items from clandestine excavation sites in Italy. HSI special agents seized the sarcophagus lid with a warrant issued by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for…
  • Walter M. Banko Enterprises Ltd. and the returns to Italy

    David Gill
    2 Mar 2015 | 2:19 pm
    Source: ICEThe US authorities have returned a number of items to Italy. They include objects handled by Walter M. Banko Enterprises Ltd.In July 2011, Walter M. Banko Enterprises Ltd., attempted to import four pieces of antique Greek pottery through the point of entry at Rouses Point, N.Y. Based on previous investigations and seizures from Walter M. Banko Enterprises Ltd., law enforcement detained the shipment to determine if the pieces had been listed as lost or stolen. In November 2011, HSI Rouses Point seized two of the four pieces of Greek pottery, both from the 5th century B.C. The items…
  • Tomb fragment from Paestum returned to Italy.

    David Gill
    2 Mar 2015 | 2:11 pm
    Paestum FragmentSource: ICEItalian authorities have returned a tomb painting apparently removed from Paestum. The statement from ICS gives a little detail:In 2009, HSI New York special agents received information indicating that a New York-based antiquity collector allegedly dealt in the sale of illicit cultural property. This collector was in possession of an artifact that was looted from an ancient Italian tomb in Paestum, Italy. In February 2012, HSI special agents seized the Steinhardt fragment, and it was forfeited to the U.S. government.This fragment was discussed before on LM with a…
  • Pompeii fragments returned to Italy

    David Gill
    2 Mar 2015 | 1:59 pm
    The objects returned to Italy, 2015Source: ICEThe US authorities have returned a number of objects to Italy ("19 cultural treasures returned to the government of Italy", 25 February 2015). They include a seizure from the Alan E. Paulson Trust:In July 2012, HSI San Diego received information from HSI New York regarding four illegally excavated antiquities from clandestine sites in Pompeii owned by the Allen E. Paulson Trust. HSI San Diego located and seized the three frescos, dating back to 63-79 A.D., and one askos, dating back to 4th century B.C. The trust administratively forfeited the…
  • The workings of PAS

    David Gill
    27 Feb 2015 | 12:29 am
    I have valued my relationship with the British Museum over several decades. It has been a feature of my life for as long as I can remember.I have read some of the material that has come out from Paul Barford's request for information. I hope that senior members of PAS will reflect on the way that staff have responded to awkward questions. Have they always reacted in a professional way? Could things have been handled differently?
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Quests of the Dragon and Bird Clan

  • Catalan surnames, Y-DNA and the Sayabiga?

    Paul Kekai Manansala
    25 Feb 2015 | 10:15 pm
    An interesting  new study may have some bearing on the theories discussed on this blog on the Sayabiga connection of the Agotes and Cagots of Spain, France and other areas of Western Europe.The study Y-chromosome diversity in Catalan surname samples: insights into surname origin and frequency examines 50 Catalan surnames chosen based mainly on their current frequency in the region.  While most of the Y-DNA haplogroups discovered from the sample of 1375 men were of expected European origin with a significant number of North African/Middle Eastern examples, two haplogroups are of…
  • The Borneo Route

    Paul Kekai Manansala
    26 Dec 2014 | 4:17 pm
    Gavin Menzies has a new book out co-written with Ian Hudson entitled Who Discovered America: The Untold History of the Peopling of America.  While I haven't read it yet, the summary and samples indicate that it follows the same theme as his Menzies' previous works.Now may be a good time to review a specific point in his earlier books that I have discussed in this blog. Specifically, the evidence surrounding the traveler Nicolo de Conti.  Here's a posting I did on the subject on Facebook:The Borneo RouteDecember 26, 2014 at 4:12pmAbove is a portion of Fra Mauro's mappa mundi of 1459…
  • Pampangos and Luzons in Sumatra

    Paul Kekai Manansala
    25 Dec 2014 | 5:27 pm
    https://www.facebook.com/notes/paul-kekai-manansala/pampangos-and-luzons-in-sumatra/10152572341218687?pnref=lhcPampangos and Luzons in SumatraNovember 12, 2014 at 9:26pmIn the text below from Blair and Robertson's we see a translation from Father Francisco Colin's Labor Evangelica published in 1663, but probably written around 1640.  In it, he tells of a Pampango (Kapampangan) who met a group of people living near a large lake in Sumatra who could speak "excellent Pampango."Either Colin or his Pampango informant may have remembered the account wrong as they say the people of the lake…
  • The Philippines and the sandalwood trade in the late pre-colonial and colonial periods

    Paul Kekai Manansala
    1 Feb 2014 | 7:47 am
    Video presentation for the Inaugural National Conference of the Philippine Association for the Study of Culture, History and Religion (PASCHR) on Feb.1, 2014 at Holy Angel University in Angeles City, Pampanga, Philippines.--- ---Few trade items were as valuable throughout human history as yellow sandalwood (Santalum album) also called white sandalwood.   In particular, the fragrant wood was an important ingredient in the production of sacred and medicinal incense and ointments[1].  Some scholars even believe that the "almug" wood mentioned in the Old Testament as a building…
  • Books: Quests of the Dragon and Bird Clan and Sailing the Black Current

    Paul Kekai Manansala
    31 Aug 2013 | 8:22 am
    Buy now! 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Theoretical Structural Archaeology

  • Where is the woodshed?

    Geoff Carter
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:47 pm
    Much of the material culture of past was fabricated from timber, and, just as significantly, fuelled by wood, a material that is usually invisible to archaeology.  Thus, provision for fuel storage, like sanitation and water supply, is one of the basics that have to be considered in the analysis of built environments.Traditionally, firewood is measured by stacked volume; a “cord” being a stack of 8x4x4 feet, or 128 cubic feet, including the spaces between logs.[1]  The calorific value of a cord will depend mostly on the actual mass of solid wood and its density, so it is…
  • The Northern Frontier; lilies, Latin, and illiteracy

    Geoff Carter
    20 Jan 2015 | 12:52 pm
    Some readers, new to archaeology, particularly students like those on MOOC courses, discover that the evidence based arguments about Roman Military archaeology found on this blog , are not well received by their tutors.  It is important to understand that many academics can only understand archaeology when it is written down, having no experience of real archaeological interpretation. As a result, the text of an archaeological report, rather than the evidence can become an article of faith, and ideas become embedded at a fundamental level, immovable objects, that actual…
  • De-turfing Hadrian’s Wall

    Geoff Carter
    28 Dec 2014 | 12:35 pm
    I have argued the postholes found on the berm of Hadrian’s Wall are the remains of the a timber rampart, which together with theTurf Wall, formed the primary rampart and ditch phase of the frontier.[here] Recent work by Eric Graafstal also suggests the turf wall was the very first part of Hadrian’s Wall, and would date this phase to 119 AD, although the author believes that the Turf Wall was built in isolation against the tribes in SW Scotland [1].  Unfortunately, this leaves the Turf Wall dangling, awaiting the eventual arrival of the Stone Wall in centre of the country, and also…
  • Did the Scots Burn Roman London?

    Geoff Carter
    4 Nov 2014 | 4:07 pm
    At some point in the mid 120’s much of London Burnt  to the ground, around the same time construction of Hadrian’s Wall was apparently abandoned, could these events be connected - just how bad crisis in Roman Britain?“... under the rule of your grandfather Hadrian what a number of soldiers were killed by the Jews, what a number by the Britons”Marcus Cornelius Fronto, letter to Marcus Aurelius, AD162 It should be said at the outset, the use of the term “Scots” is generic for the people who still controlled the upper third of the island, and when Hadrian visited Britain…
  • Posthole Archaeology; Function, Form and Fighting

    Geoff Carter
    26 Oct 2014 | 1:19 pm
    In the previous post I posed the question what buildings does a moderately complex hierarchical agricultural society require, looking at aspects of agricultural buildings; this time I am looking at moderately complex hierarchical society, or at least that end of hierarchy that tends to represented in archaeology.It is fashionable, and perhaps progressive, to talk of higher status individuals or elites, to avoid cultural bias inherent such terms as aristocracy.   However, I use the term in its original cultural context precisely to reference that bias, or understanding, and…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Archaeology News from Past Horizons

  • Reconstructing the Deskford Iron-Age carnyx

    Past Horizons
    2 Mar 2015 | 9:41 am
    The Deskford carnyx is the head of an Iron Age trumpet, found in the north-east of Scotland around 1816. It is a masterpiece of early Celtic art, shaped to resemble a wild boar. In 1992 a replica was made by metalsmith John Creed. Related posts: Findings indicate ritual destruction of Iron Age warriors Eggs of intestinal parasites identified in Late Iron Age site Danish Iron Age village to be re-born Chariot fittings unearthed at Iron-Age hillfort An Iron Age room with a view
  • Hunter gatherers had wheat 2,000 years before farming in the UK

    Past Horizons
    1 Mar 2015 | 8:56 am
    Researchers found evidence for a variety of wheat at a submerged archaeological site off the south coast of England. Related posts: Analysis confirms dairy farming in prehistoric Finland Dogs were our companions long before advent of farming Marine hunter-gatherer with early Southern African lineage Study of ancient dogs in the Americas suggests migration 10,000 years ago DNA from 36,000 year-old European hunter gatherer shows deep shared ancestry
  • Study of Pharaoh Senebkay shows he died violently in battle

    Past Horizons
    28 Feb 2015 | 2:28 am
    Pharaoh Woseribre Senebkay, who lived during the later part of Egypt's Second Intermediate Period (ca. 1650–1550 BCE), is now the earliest Egyptian Pharaoh whose remains show he died in battle. Related posts: First detailed study of Ancient Egyptians at Deir el-Medina Forensic pathologist discovers trauma evidence for killer blow to Richard III Deadly injuries to skull and pelvis of Richard III revealed Researchers try to answer mystery of saintly skull Skeleton in car park is Richard III beyond all reasonable doubt
  • Parisian hospital cemetery excavation: from medieval to modern

    Past Horizons
    28 Feb 2015 | 1:32 am
    The lowering of the ground level of some cellars in Paris has resulted in the discovery of a large number of skeletons associated with a cemetery belonging to the Hospital of the Trinity, in use from the 12th century onwards. Related posts: Shackled individuals found in Gallo-Roman cemetery in southwest France Excavation of Saint-Germain church Archaeologists study Thracian burial ground and settlement in Romania Largest Roman period necropolis in Poland to undergo detailed research Understanding the people of the lake
  • European bison became a fugitive species before eventual extinction

    Past Horizons
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:11 am
    In prehistoric times bison preferred to inhabit open spaces, not only forests. This is the conclusion that Polish and German scientists have come to after testing the oldest European bison (Bison bonasus) bones. Related posts: Dogs, wild cats, foxes and badgers were eaten at El Mirador cave European farmers were still lactose intolerant after 5,000 years Research supports Neanderthals as a separate species Understanding the people of the lake Pinpointing early sustained farming on the Tibetan Plateau
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Archaeology News Network

  • Medieval mass grave found under Paris supermarket

    1 Mar 2015 | 7:30 am
    More than 200 skeletons have been discovered in a medieval mass grave beneath a supermarket in the middle of the French capital, with archaeologists unsure of how they died or why the bodies were placed there. The archeologists from the French National Institute for Preventive Archaeological  Research (INRAP) plan to carry out DNA tests on the remains [Credit: © Denis Gliksman/Inrap]The grisly discovery was made beneath a... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Iraq reopens Baghdad museum after 12 years

    28 Feb 2015 | 8:30 am
    Iraq's national museum officially reopened Saturday after 12 years of painstaking efforts during which close to a third of 15,000 pieces looted during the US-led invasion were recovered. A statue dating back to the eighth century B.C is displayed at the entrance of Iraq's  national museum during its official reopening on February 28, 2015 in the  capital Baghdad. The national museum reopened after 12 years of... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Etruscan bronze, Tiepolo painting returned to Italy

    28 Feb 2015 | 7:00 am
    Decades after being stolen in Italy, an ancient statuette and an 18th-century painting were returned to the country's government Tuesday after turning up in New York. The five-inch-tall Etruscan-era bronze statuette of Hercules wielding a club that was  stolen from the Archeological Museum of Oliveriano in Pesaro, Italy, in 1964  [Credit: Brendan McDermid/Reuters]The handover marked the latest case of U.S. authorities... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Anglo-Saxon pendant found in Norfolk field

    27 Feb 2015 | 12:00 pm
    A student who unearthed an "outstanding" piece of Anglo-Saxon jewellery believes it could be worth tens of thousands of pounds. Awaiting cleaning, the seventh-century Anglo-Saxon gold and garnet pendant  discovered in South Norfolk [Credit: Tom Lucking]Tom Lucking, 23, found the gold pendant, inlaid with a "profusion" of garnets, while metal detecting on farmland just before Christmas. The 7cm (2.8in) item has been described by... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Coptic monks scramble to protect ancient monastery

    27 Feb 2015 | 11:00 am
    Marking just the latest of a long dispute which arose around a road project threatening to demolish an archaeological site, Coptic monks are literally willing to put their lives on the line. St. Macarius Coptic Monastery in existence since the 4th century  faces threat of demolition [Credit: Reuters]According to Fides, the project to build a road that should unite the city of Fayoum to an oasis area crossing the territories... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Mathisen Corollary

  • One Foundation

    David Warner Mathisen
    1 Mar 2015 | 2:44 am
    video linkFrom the 1973 album Burnin by The Wailers, these are the lyrics to "One Foundation," written by the immortal Peter Tosh. The words sung by Peter Tosh (lead vocals on this song) are in non-italicized  (upright) text, and those in italics are sung by the accompanying artists: Got to build our love On one foundationGot to build our loveOn one foundationGot to build our loveOn one foundation[or] There will never beNo love at allThere will never beNo love at allGot to put asideMan's segregationGot to put asideThem organizationGot to put asideThem denominationThere will --…
  • The celestial fire

    David Warner Mathisen
    28 Feb 2015 | 1:45 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).The Bibles of antiquity have but one theme: the incarnation. The vast body of ancient Scripture discoursed on but one subject -- the descent of souls, units of deific Mind, sons of God, into fleshly bodies developed by natural evolution on planets such as ours, therein to undergo an experience by which their continued growth through the ranges and planes of expanding consciousness might be carried forward to ever higher grades of divine being.    -- Alvin Boyd Kuhn, Esoteric Structure of the Alphabet and Its Hidden Mystical Language. 20.The world…
  • Bodhidharma, Shen Guang, and the Shaolin Temple

    David Warner Mathisen
    27 Feb 2015 | 2:58 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).The historicity of many aspects of the famous Shaolin Temple* of China can be, and has been, a subject for study and debate.As with many such debates, particularly those in which deep reverence or personal beliefs are involved, examination of this subject can sometimes become contentious.Without entering directly into the "deep water" of such disputes or debates, we can at least agree that the tradition of the Shaolin Temple is itself indisputably connected with two very important traditions: Ch'an Buddhism (which is often spelled Chan Buddhism, and which is…
  • Shang oracle bones: more evidence of humanity's shared shamanic heritage

    David Warner Mathisen
    22 Feb 2015 | 4:16 pm
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).Numerous previous posts, including"Humanity's shared shamanic heritage""The shamanic foundation of the world's ancient wisdom"and"The centrality of ecstasy, according to ancient wisdom"have advanced the position that what may be broadly termed the shamanic worldview belongs as a precious inheritance to all the world's people, and can be conclusively demonstrated to be the foundation of the nearly every ancient sacred tradition on our planet.This thesis would include those cultures whose scriptures and sacred traditions are built upon the common system of…
  • The Tao Te Ching: "Be like water"

    David Warner Mathisen
    19 Feb 2015 | 3:51 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).The preceding post presented evidence to suggest that the ancient wisdom which informs many of the sacred traditions around the world may have had a deep common source, or that while manifesting itself in different outward appearances in different cultures and time periods around the world, one stream can be detected surging through all of them.In particular, that post and previous posts related to this discussion (such as this one and this one) argue that when these ancient traditions are understood to be esoteric and allegorical in nature, then their deeper…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Cultural Heritage Lawyer Rick St. Hilaire

  • Italy Asks for MoU Renewal to Protect Cultural Heritage

    22 Feb 2015 | 6:26 pm
    The Italian government has asked the United States to renew a bilateral agreement or Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) restricting American import of archaeological artifacts in jeopardy of pillage.The protective MoU between the two nations has been renewed twice before. The current agreement, in place since 2011, covers pre-Classical, Classical, and Imperial Roman artifacts from Italy.The Cultural Property Advisory Committee (CPAC) will meet in public session on April 8 in Washington, DC to discuss the latest request.To submit written comments concerning the proposed MoU, click…
  • Canadian Man Charged with Trafficking Dinosaur Fossils from China

    21 Feb 2015 | 5:30 am
    U.S. District Court in Tucson, AZ.A man has been arrested in Arizona for allegedly trying to sell dinosaur fossils imported from China to undercover federal agents. Jun Yang, a Canadian, faces criminal charges of archaeological smuggling and wildlife trafficking.The charges, initiated by U.S. Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), likely will be challenged by defense lawyers because of legal irregularities.Filed on Tuesday in federal district court (15-mj-07055), the complaint alleges that the defendantdid fraudulently and knowingly offer for sale and sell merchandise, namely one…
  • Cultural Heritage Events in Dallas and Philadelphia You Won't Want to Miss

    15 Feb 2015 | 9:44 am
    Roger AtwoodRed Arch board of directors Roger Atwood and Victoria Reed will be featured at two upcoming events you will want to attend.Atwood will share his vast knowledge of cultural heritage looting on February 20 at the Dallas Museum of Art in Texas. Atwood is the author of Stealing History, a riveting account of the antiquities trafficking underworld. He is a contributing editor at Archaeology magazine and a London correspondent for ARTnews.Victoria ReedOn March 27 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Dr. Reed will share her experiences as a provenance investigator as a panelist at…
  • Combating Terror Funding: Cultural Heritage Trafficking in Syria and Iraq Targeted by Unanimously Adopted UN Security Council Resolution

    12 Feb 2015 | 7:14 pm
    The United Nations Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution 2199 today. It is designed to strangle terrorists' ability to raise money through cultural heritage trafficking and other criminal sources like oil smuggling and kidnap and ransom.Adopted under Chapter VII of the UN Charter, which covers threats to peace, the resolution particularly targets fundraising efforts by the Islamic State (IS/ISIS/ISIL) and Al Nusra Front (ANF).Ambassador Samantha Power, U.S. Permanent Representative to the UN, told Security Council members, "by imposing a new ban on the trade…
  • Federal Judge Denies ACCG's Motion to Reconsider

    5 Feb 2015 | 2:52 pm
    Judge Catherine Blake has once again said no to the Ancient Coin Collectors Guild in the case of U.S. v. Three Knife-Shaped Coins Et al.In a short ruling issued Tuesday, the federal court judge for the district of Maryland wrote:I have considered the motion for reconsideration ... filed by the Ancient Coin Collectors Guild (“the Guild”), together with the government’s opposition and the Guild’s reply. As I continue to believe that my opinion issued June 3, 2014 correctly interprets the Fourth Circuit’s ruling in Ancient Coin Collectors Guild v. U.S. Customs and…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty

  • Episode 22 “Paleo Muffins”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    2 Mar 2015 | 6:17 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome to a new episode of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty! In this episode we’re going Paleo…Paleo diet that is! There’s been a bit of controversy concerning this “lifestyle” from the anthropological community. So I thought we’d examine the concept of the diet and what it does and doesn’t have to do with the lives of our paleolithic ancestors. Also, (to be read with your best Jerry Seinfeld impression) what, is the deal, with Paleo muffins? Here are some links you might be interested in checking out…
  • Episode 21 “The Archaeology of Alcohol: Ancient Ales Edition”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    19 Jan 2015 | 3:57 pm
     Subscribe to my feed! Welcome to Episode 21 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty “The Archaeology of Alcohol: Ancient Ales Edition!” I suggest you sit back, pop open a cold one, get a little toasty, and enjoy this generally informative fun-times podcast. So, our ancestors have been making alcoholic concoctions for thousands of years, and thanks to science and archaeology we now have the ability to reconstruct the recipes to some of these awesome drinks. I thought it would be interesting to find out about how alcohol has evolved from its early days to…
  • Episode 20 “What’s Next?”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    2 Dec 2014 | 4:40 am
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back! It’s Episode 20 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty, “What’s Next?” So, I thought I’d catch you up on recent events relating to grad school and my career(Spoiler: I’m graduating, yay me!). That turned into the perfect opportunity for me to dispense some sagely advice about going out into the job market and figuring out what to do after school. If you’re looking for some great sources to look for jobs or learn about how to get jobs, I suggest you check out some of the sources I listed in…
  • Episode 19 “Caen you handle this? It’s France, part Deux!”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    2 Oct 2014 | 11:50 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back to The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty! This is episode 19 of the podcast “Caen you handle this? It’s France, part Deux!” In this, the second installment of Jenny’s French adventures, we talk about my time in Paris and the Normandy region. Some of the things I waxed on about in this episode include: What’s up with city planning and historical relevance in Paris? Saint Denis Paris? Really? His name is Denis… Jenny’s movie recommendation for the month: Midnight in Paris Guess the obscure musical…
  • Episode 18 “Béarnaise Awesome-Sauce”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:17 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Bonjour mes amis! Et bienvenue to episode 18 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty, “Béarnaise Awesome-Sauce!” You may have noticed that I’ve been gone for the last three weeks (yeah, sorry about that), well it’s because I’ve been in France! So I thought now that I’ve returned to my native soil I would tell you all about my travels and the fun and fascinating things I learned while exploring the beautiful land of baguettes, burgundy, and béarnaise sauce! This will be a two-part series because there’s…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica

  • Audio News for February 22 to 28, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    2 Mar 2015 | 8:55 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Roman tombstone found still marking English grave (details) Widely condemned video shows ISIL demolishing irreplaceable Assyrian antiquities (details) Andean mortuary shows how wandering peoples took their ancestors along (details) Forensics show Pharoah Senebkay died in battle (details)
  • Audio News for February 15 to 21, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:19 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Diet and geographic range of Peruvian mummies revealed through new study (details) New evidence for Hopewell trade network in North Carolina (details) Shrines found in Armenia used to predict the future (details) Roman Tuscan villa may belong to Ben-Hur’s arch-rival (details)
  • Audio News for February 8 to 14, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    16 Feb 2015 | 6:32 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Negev desert sites reveal an ancient fertility cult (details) Drone technology will scan for hidden earthworks in ancient Amazonia (details) New find shows spread of animal bone fortune telling in early Japan (details) Eastern U.S. research triggers call for larger studies of patterns in population change (details)
  • Audio News for February 1 to 7, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    9 Feb 2015 | 9:09 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Temple construction indicates rapid change in the rise of Maui’s first kingdom (details) New excavation at an old site finds ties to a Biblical settlement (details) An accidental find suggests Anglo-Saxon origins for a garden ornament (details) A new digital reconstruction depicts the homes of ancient Egyptians (details)
  • Audio News for January 25 to 31, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    2 Feb 2015 | 5:18 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Spanish dig finds traces of Hannibal's troops (details) New spear point study concludes earliest Americans used spear-throwers (details) Red paint found marking Roman Colosseum's seating system (details) New temple complex shows Maya desperation in a time of drought (details)
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    NOSAS Archaeology Blog

  • A Bronze Age Cist Burial in Drumnadrochit

    nosas
    7 Feb 2015 | 4:52 pm
    by James McComas (NOSAS) Drumnadrochit, by Loch Ness. On the flat former croft land between the Rivers Coilte and Enrick a new NHS Medical Centre is under construction. In January 2015 workers on the site removed a large stone slab. Beneath the slab, undisturbed for perhaps 4500 years, were the crouched remains of an individual resting in a stone lined cist, approximately 0.7 metres deep. Burial Cist in Drumnadrochit (Courtesy of Mary Peteranna/ AOC) Initially Highland Council archaeologists assessed the site, concluding it was probably bronze age.  A skull and possible femur were clearly…
  • Clava Type Cairns of the Inverness Area

    nosas
    1 Feb 2015 | 1:01 pm
    by Anne Coombs (NOSAS) Clava cairns are unique to a small area of Eastern Highlands of Scotland.  Identified originally along the valley of the River Nairn, a good start point for any tour of these sites is at Balnuaran of Clava near Culloden. Here Historic Scotland cares for a well preserved group of three circular burial cairns in a small area with a car park and interpretation panels (see the H.S. leaflet). Surrounded by trees beside the river this location can provide an atmospheric even ‘sacred’ sense of the past, especially at mid-winter or in the spring.  Two small chambered…
  • A Cross Stone found in Rosemarkie

    nosas
    18 Jan 2015 | 7:06 am
    by Tim Blackie (NOSAS) Rosemarkie Cross Stone (Tim Blackie) This intriguing carved, reworked and relatively portable piece of sandstone (0.32 x 0.38 x 0.15m) was originally located in a rockery in the garden of 1 High Street, Rosemarkie. Neither the owners of the house nor the local community have any knowledge of its provenance. The find location at 1 High Street is at the south west top of the High Street close to Rosemarkie Church and ancient graveyard where many Pictish and medieval stones have been discovered. The owners were selling their house and offered it to me as I was…
  • Sun-watch at Garbeg: A Conjecture

    nosas
    12 Jan 2015 | 1:54 pm
    A look at how a prehistoric agricultural community in the Scottish Highlands could have made sophisticated use of the sun.    by David Robinson (NOSAS) On a remote expanse of high ground, roughly 2 kilometres north of Drumnadrochit in the Highlands of Scotland, sits the extensive series of prehistoric archaeological features known as Garbeg. The records of the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historic Monuments contain detailed references to these features (see appendix), which include hut circles and field system, hut circle groups and a Pictish Barrow cemetery. There are also other…
  • Another Old Route through Ross-shire – Achanalt Station to Dalnachroich in Strathconon via Badinluchie

    nosas
    31 Dec 2014 | 9:33 am
    by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS) What is believed to be an old droving route from Badinluchie, south of Loch Achanalt in Strath Bran, to Dalnachroich in Strathconon was followed by several NOSAS members on a sunny day in October. Climbing up from Badinluchie The Roy map of c1750 has two roads from the east coast to the west through Ross-shire, one through Strathconon and one through Strath Bran. At this time they would hardly have been roads but more probably bridle ways easily traversed by ponies; a road from Contin to Poolewe through Strath Bran first appears in the records about the year 1760.
 
Log in