Archaeology

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  • The archaeology of the Imaginary Spaces

    Theoretical Structural Archaeology
    Geoff Carter
    13 Jan 2014 | 6:30 pm
    One of the first things you learn as an archaeologist is that “History” is the study of specialist artefacts involving writing and other forms of recording, and that “Prehistory” is marked by the absence of such material. There is period we call “Proto-history”, in which “Prehistoric” issues are alluded to in later documents, providing plenty of scope for conjecture; ideas like “Druids” inhabit these spaces, along with more peripheral characters like Merlin and Arthur.Narrative History on the BBC Television is a cultural phenomenon in its own right, and while Prehistory…
  • Did the ancients somehow know about DNA?

    The Mathisen Corollary
    David Warner Mathisen
    10 Apr 2014 | 12:22 am
    Conventional history tells us that the double-helix structure and base-pairing characteristic of the DNA molecule was not "discovered" until the twentieth century, based upon the work of scientists Rosalind Franklin, Raymond Gosling, James Watson, Francis Crick, and Erwin Chargaff, primarily in the 1950s and 1960s.Erwin Chargaff (1905-2002) in particular was responsible for the insight that DNA molecules contain roughly equal proportions of adenine and thymine (one of the "base pairs" in the DNA molecule) and of guanine and cytosine (the other "base pair").  Since that time, high school…
  • Honey Bees and Humans

    About.com Archaeology
    16 Apr 2014 | 1:55 am
    The honey bee (Apis mellifera), is a non-domesticated domestic partner of ours, which will come as no surprise to anyone who has been stung. Mesolithic rock painting of a honey hunter harvesting honey and wax from a bees nest in a tree. At Cuevas de la Araña. ca 8000 to 6000 BC). Redraft of image by Amada44...Read Full Post
  • Easter, Resurrection and Chocolate Bunnies: Social Marketing Through the Ages

    AntiquityNOW
    AntiquityNOW
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 am
    Easter is one of the holiest of holidays for Christians.   And with Easter’s roots in antiquity, we can see why the symbolism of this holiday continues to give succor and hope to believers today. But Easter is also a holiday … Continue reading →
  • Egypt Officially Asks U.S. for MoU to Protect Cultural Heritage

    Cultural Heritage Lawyer Rick St. Hilaire
    15 Apr 2014 | 4:20 pm
    The Cultural Property Advisory Committee (CPAC) is scheduled to take up Egypt's formal request to have American import protections placed on endangered archaeological material originating from that country. The Federal Register today pre-published a notice announcing that CPAC will begin a review of Egypt's proposed Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on June 2.Temple of Isis at Philae in Egypt.CHL has been calling for greater protection of archaeological sites, religious structures, and monuments since 2011 because of increasing perils to cultural heritage in Egypt. These threats…
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    About.com Archaeology

  • Honey Bees and Humans

    16 Apr 2014 | 1:55 am
    The honey bee (Apis mellifera), is a non-domesticated domestic partner of ours, which will come as no surprise to anyone who has been stung. Mesolithic rock painting of a honey hunter harvesting honey and wax from a bees nest in a tree. At Cuevas de la Araña. ca 8000 to 6000 BC). Redraft of image by Amada44...Read Full Post
  • Chachapoya Culture

    14 Apr 2014 | 1:55 am
    The people who built the 12th century "fortress" at Kuelap in the Andes mountains of Peru are called by ethnohistorians and archaeologists the Chachapoya.
  • Lactase Persistence in Southern Africa

    11 Apr 2014 | 12:49 am
    Two upcoming articles in the journal Current Biology describe newly identified migration patterns in Later Stone Age southern Africa, arising from recent findings about lactase persistence.
  • The Chachapoya Ceremonial Center of Kuelap

    7 Apr 2014 | 1:55 am
    Last week, I posted a fairly blistering review of a video from the PBS series, Secrets of the Dead. I promised I would follow up with some scientific reports on the various sites mentioned: today, we look at Kuelap. ...Read Full Post
  • Secrets of the Dead: Carthage's Lost Warriors

    2 Apr 2014 | 2:05 am
    Don't get me wrong: I love the PBS series Secrets of the Dead. It gives us all fresh insight into alternative ideas of archaeological and historical reality that, well, I guess we need. "Carthage's Lost Warriors" is alternative, alrighty. ...Read Full Post
 
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    archaeology - Yahoo News Search Results

  • Ancient puppyprints found

    18 Apr 2014 | 6:50 am
    The paw prints and hoof prints of a few meddlesome animals have been preserved for posterity on ancient Roman tiles recently discovered by archaeologists in England.
  • Ancient Puppy Paw Prints Found on Roman Tiles

    18 Apr 2014 | 4:43 am
    The paw prints and hoof prints of a few meddlesome animals have been preserved for posterity on ancient Roman tiles recently discovered by archaeologists in England. "They are beautiful finds, as they represent a snapshot, a single moment in history," said Nick Daffern, a senior project manager with Wardell Armstrong Archaeology. Wardell Armstrong Archaeology was brought in to dig at a site ...
  • Saturday events at Pictograph Caves, Four Dances mark Archaeology Month

    17 Apr 2014 | 1:43 pm
    In celebration of Archaeology Month the Bureau of Land Management is teaming up with Montana State Parks to host an Archaeology Day at the Four Dances Natural Area and Pictograph Cave State Park on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Family Archaeology Day is May 3 -- Gazette.Net

    17 Apr 2014 | 1:33 pm
    Montgomery Parks will host Family Archaeology Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 3, where families can learn about archaeology with a simulated dig. There also will be tours of Needwood Mansion, storytelling, old-time games and crafts. The event will be at Needwood Mansion, 6700 Needwood Road, Derwood.
  • Volunteers can help MVAC find new archaeological sites

    16 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    Volunteers are invited to help the Mississippi Valley Archaeology Center explore new archeological sites.
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    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine

  • Sections of the Great Wall of China Unearthed

    18 Apr 2014 | 1:00 pm
    BEIJING, CHINA—The Global Post reports that three sections of the Great Wall thought to have been constructed during the Qin Dynasty (221 B.C. to 206 B.C.) have been discovered in northwest China. The stone wall had been placed in a valley of the Yellow River in order to prevent foreign invaders from crossing the river when it was frozen.  
  • Physical Impact of the Trail of Tears and the Civil War Analyzed

    18 Apr 2014 | 12:49 pm
    RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA—Environmental stressors brought on by the Trail of Tears and the Civil War led to significant changes in the shape of skulls of members of the eastern and western bands of the Cherokee people, according to researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Tennessee. They analyzed data collected in the late nineteenth century by anthropologist Franz Boas, who measured the length and breadth of skulls from many Native American tribes. “When times are tough, people have less access to adequate nutrition and are at greater risk of disease. This…
  • Famous Civil War Gunboat May Have Been Found

    18 Apr 2014 | 12:32 pm
    GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA—Bruce Terrell of the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries’ Maritime Heritage Program announced that the Planter, a ship commandeered in Charleston Harbor by a 23-year-old enslaved man named Robert Smalls, may have been found buried in ten feet of silt with scanning sonar and a magnetometer. Smalls and other African-American crewmembers took control of the transport steamer, picked up Smalls’ wife and children, and headed to the Union blockade in 1862. He surrendered the vessel, which was transformed into a Union gunboat with Smalls as its captain. The…
  • Revolutionary War Tunnel Preserved in South Carolina

    18 Apr 2014 | 12:10 pm
    NINETY SIX, SOUTH CAROLINA—Firefighters wearing breathing equipment are assisting a team from the University of South Florida with the exploration of a siege tunnel dating to the Revolutionary War. The tunnel was dug by Americans in 1781 during the siege of Ninety Six in order to place explosives underneath the loyalist-controlled Star Fort, but they were turned back and the explosion never occurred. The unfinished tunnel will be mapped and photographed in order to create 3-D models. “We can capture whole landscapes in hours, minutes as opposed to traditional archaeology that would be out…
  • Copper Artifact Discovered in Britain at a Portal Dolmen

    17 Apr 2014 | 1:01 pm
    ANGLESEY, WALES—A copper artifact has been discovered at the ruins of a Neolithic tomb on the island of Anglesey by an international team of researchers. “The big question in archaeology at the moment is whether there was a Copper Age in Britain. Did copper come to Britain before bronze? This discovery helps to suggest that we did have a Copper Age,” George Nash of the University of Bristol explained to The Daily Post. Called Perthi Duon, the tomb is thought to have been built as a single-chambered tomb around 5,500 years ago, with a compacted-stone, kidney-shaped cairn surrounding the…
 
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    ScienceBlogs

  • Copy vs Dropbox [Greg Laden's Blog]

    Greg Laden
    19 Apr 2014 | 11:33 am
    Copy is a new cloud storage service that may be a serious competitor to Drobbox. I just installed it and I like it. Dropbox gives 2 Gigabytes for free, 100 Gigabytes for 9.99 a month, 200 Gigabytes for 19.99 a month, and 500 Gigabytes for 49.99 a month. Copy gives 15 Gigabytes for free, 250 Gigabytes for $10.00 a month, and 500 Gigabytes for 15.00 a month (cheaper if you pay by the year). I know for a fact that Dropbox works well with Linux and Mac and I assume Windows. Copy claims to be compatible and well integrated with all of these system. I’ve not thoroughly tested Copy yet, but…
  • Cats beware… [Life Lines]

    Dr. Dolittle
    19 Apr 2014 | 12:56 am
    Image from: bluecrossanimalhospital.ca The FDA has issued a warning that Easter lilies are toxic to cats. According to veterinarian Dr. Melanie McLean at the US Food and Drug Administration ingestion of even a small portion of the leaves, pollen or flowers of the plant are very poisonous to cats. Initial complications include vomiting but then may lead to kidney failure and death if not treated. If you think your cat may have ingested a lily, then seek immediate medical attention for your pet. Tiger, Asiatic, Day and Japanese Show lilies are also highly toxic to cats. Dog owners take comfort,…
  • Killer sponges [Life Lines]

    Dr. Dolittle
    19 Apr 2014 | 12:32 am
    Sounds kind of like an oxymoron doesn’t it? Who knew sponges could be carnivorous? Scientists have described four new species of carnivorous sponges in a newly published article in Zootaxa. Check out this video from the lead author of the study, Lonny Lundsten who is a Senior Research Technician at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute: Lundsten L, Reiswig HM, Austin WC. Four new species of Cladorhizidae (Porifera, Demospongiae, Poecilosclerida) from the Northeast Pacific. Zootaxa. 3786 (2): 101–123, 2014.
  • Experimental Biology [Life Lines]

    Dr. Dolittle
    19 Apr 2014 | 12:07 am
    I am very excited about the upcoming Experimental Biology conference that starts next weekend. I just looked through the Spring newsletter for the Comparative and Evolutionary Physiology section of the American Physiological Society. Check out the exciting programming in comparative physiology at this year’s conference: Monday, April 28 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM Featured Topic: Abstract-Driven Trainee Session 3:15 PM – 5:15 PM Featured Topic: Comparative Physiology of Aging and Senescence Tuesday, April 29 8:00 AM – 10:00 AM CEPS Symposium: RNAseq Approaches to Understanding…
  • Ask Ethan #33: A Flight Without Stars (Synopsis) [Starts With A Bang]

    Ethan
    18 Apr 2014 | 5:49 pm
    “Don’t get involved in partial problems, but always take flight to where there is a free view over the whole single great problem, even if this view is still not a clear one.” -Ludwig Wittgenstein You know how bad light pollution is for astronomy, and how hard we try to escape it. We search for the darkest skies possible, away from all man-made light sources. We try to get as high above the atmosphere to clear, stable air, we try and avoid the clouds and stay as far away from the Moon as possible. Image credit: Gemini Observatory. You might think, “What better way to do that than…
 
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    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek

  • The April edition of the Video News from TAC, online and on TV

    Rick Pettigrew
    17 Apr 2014 | 10:22 am
    Friends and colleagues: The latest installment of the Video News from TAC features the following stories: * Divers and snorkelers can tour six shipwrecks on the Maritime Heritage Trail in Biscayne National Park. Before her complete ruin upon the reefs in 1966, the yacht Mandalay was an impressive two-masted sailing ship. * Formed under the tumultuous waves of Pleistocene Lake Lahontan, Hidden Cave was sealed from access until the indigenous people of the Carson Sink in western Nevada 3,800-3,500 years ago discovered it. But then it became an important part of their lives as they harvested the…
  • Mysterious Nook in house

    Anita Cohen-Williams
    10 Apr 2014 | 11:59 am
    A friend on Facebook is looking for help in identifying mystery structures on both sides of attic in front of brick chimneys. They are completely enclosed and plastered on interior with only access through door.  The house is in Cumberland, MD and was built around 1800. Any ideas?
  • Volunteer Position Announcement: Listserv Specialist

    Rick Pettigrew
    26 Mar 2014 | 11:30 am
    Title: Listserv Specialist Background: Archaeological Legacy Institute is a tax-exempt nonprofit organization based in Eugene, Oregon.  Our streaming-media Web site and chief project, The Archaeology Channel (www.archaeologychannel.org; TAC), launched 13 years ago, has become one of the world’s most popular Web sites relating to archaeology and the human cultural heritage, with annual traffic in the millions of page views.  We now are rebuilding TAC as an even more attractive, content-filled, dynamic, and interactive platform for our programming, services and information.  A…
  • The March edition of the Video News from TAC, online and on TV

    Rick Pettigrew
    15 Mar 2014 | 4:30 pm
    Friends and colleagues: The latest installment of the Video News from TAC features the following stories: * Divers and snorkelers can tour six shipwrecks on the Maritime Heritage Trail in Biscayne National Park. The Alicia ran aground in the Bay in 1905. * In December 2013, ALI Executive Director Rick Pettigrew served as a juror in Tehran for the Cinema Verite Iran International Documentary Film Festival. * In 2011, geophysical instruments maker, Geometrics, teamed with University of Georgia Ph.D. student Dan Bigman to perform a magetometer survey at Ocmulgee National Monument to image buried…
  • The February edition of the Video News from TAC, online and on TV

    Rick Pettigrew
    17 Feb 2014 | 11:53 am
    Friends and colleagues: The latest installment of the Video News from TAC features our new film on the cultural heritage of Guam. Separated by 1500 miles from the nearest large land mass, Guam saw the first human migrants 3500 or more years ago. These colonists participated in the longest over-water migration in human history up to that point and became the native Chamorros of Guam and its sister islands. Their cultural identity lives on despite centuries of colonialism, devastation in war and the influences of the modern global economy. After bridge construction reveals human burials in an…
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    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog

  • Palau Nangka: Treasures reportedly sighted

    noelbynature
    17 Apr 2014 | 6:25 am
    The treasure hunt at Pulau Nangka takes an interesting turn as one of the companies commissioned to search for the relics reports finding some in a cave. However, the nature of these relics have not been divulged and it is not known if these finds will be systematically recorded. Hundreds of relics sighted inside cave The Star, 17 April 2014 Hundreds of relics in Pulau Nangka have been sighted in a cave that is believed to have been used as a hideout for Sultan Mahmud when he fled from the Portuguese armada that invaded Malacca in 1511. One of the companies given a state government approval…
  • Śailendra foundations found in central Java

    noelbynature
    17 Apr 2014 | 6:02 am
    A post on the blog Impressions of Jogja talks about some recent archaeological work in the Semarang regency of central Java, on finds relating to the Śailendra period. New Evidence of a Śailendra Presence Found in Central Java Impressions of Jogja, 15 April 2014 After a week of excavation, in Ngreco hamlet, Kesongo village, Tuntang District, Semarang Regency, possible evidence of a Śailendra presence in the area has been found by a team archaeologists comprising members of the National Research Center for Archaeology (Indonesian: Pusat Arkeologi Nasional), Gadjah Mada University’s…
  • Treasure hunt at Pulau Nangka

    noelbynature
    15 Apr 2014 | 6:32 pm
    A strange story that is developing in Malaysia: The Malacca government has authorised a treasure hunt in Pulau Nangka, in search of gold thought to belong to the Malacca Sultanate. The rumours of treasure on the island seem to be more steeped in legend than fact, and according to Malaysia’s Heritage Commissioner, the state government does not have the authority to do authorise a hunt. Pulau Nangka. Source: The Star, 20140414 Antiquarian: Decipher scripts and symbols – and treasures will be found The Star, 15 April 2014 Billion-ringgit treasure hunt in Malacca The Star, 14 April…
  • Cambodia reports $2.5 billion earnings from tourism

    noelbynature
    15 Apr 2014 | 6:23 pm
    While not exactly an archaeology story, the fact that most tourists who visit Cambodia go to Angkor makes this a relevant one to post here. Source: Bangkok Post 20140415 Cambodia earns $2.5bn from tourism Bangkok Post, 15 April 2014 Sok An, head of the Office of the Council of Ministers, said the number of foreign tourists to Cambodia has been steadily increasing from only around 120,000 in 1993 to more than 4.2 million in 2013, most of them visitors to Cambodian cultural heritage sites such as the Angkor Wat temples. Last year’s income from tourism accounted for around 16% of the…
  • Chinese tourists to Angkor up

    noelbynature
    15 Apr 2014 | 6:10 pm
    Chinese tourists to Angkor see a 10% increase compared to last year for the January-February period. Chinese tourists to Cambodia’s Angkor world heritage site continue to grow Xinhua, 13 April 2014 The number of Chinese visitors to Cambodia’s Angkor Wat temple, one of the World Heritage Sites, has continued to grow in the first two months of this year, a tourism official said Sunday. Some 71,100 Chinese had visited the 12th century temple during the January-February period this year, up 10.5 percent compared with the same period last year, said Chhoeuy Chhorn, administration chief…
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    Publishing Archaeology

  • Is bad research unethical?

    Michael E. Smith
    6 Apr 2014 | 9:44 pm
    Suppose I were to decide to fudge some data in a publication. Maybe I refrain from reporting some inconvenient data that don't support my argument, or perhaps I push my pet interpretation hard and don't bother to acknowledge counter-arguments or contrary data. Are these things unethical?I refrain from this kind of activity. These activities seem deeply problematic and against my fundamental beliefs. I will usually make a stink if I catch such activities by colleagues or students. They are certainly against the standard ethical canons of science (see On Being A Scientist, something I often…
  • Why do I dislike archaeological theory?

    Michael E. Smith
    3 Apr 2014 | 9:22 pm
    Archaeological theory, how do I hate thee? Let me count the ways. I am planning a graduate seminar in theory for the fall, so I have theory on the brain. Ugh, I'd rather think about other things! Like basketball and beer. Will I root for Cindy's alma mater, the Florida gators, or for the Wisconsin badgers for Big-10 solidarity? Maybe they won't both win Saturday.Reason 1: Archaeological theory is boring, the same old, same old. I did some checking with other graduate archaeological theory courses around the country, and they are pretty much the same old historical perspective. First came the…
  • Why haven't you read Blanton & Fargher (2008)?

    Michael E. Smith
    25 Mar 2014 | 8:57 am
    The book, Collective Action in the Formation of Pre-Modern States, by Richard Blanton and Lane Fargher, is the most important work published on ancient and premodern political dynamics for several decades. I just realized that I have yet to write a post on the book. I have mentioned it often in this blog since its publication in 2008, but now it is time to focus on it more directly. I will give just two reasons why all archaeologists concerned with states need to read the book and take its findings into account; there are lots of subsidiary reasons (such as, it is full of great historical…
  • Did a robot edit our paper?

    Michael E. Smith
    12 Mar 2014 | 2:30 pm
    Q: Was this an urban settlement?I've just finished correcting proofs for an article ("Neighborhood formation in semi-urban settlements") in the Journal of Urbanism (Routledge journals). Most of my "corrections" were fixes of errors introduced in the editing process. This is always frustrating, but the manuscript was fill of these errors. It looks to me like many of the errors were produced by algorithms, not human beings. Perhaps the publisher is trying to save money by using automated bad editing instead of human editing.Here are a few examples. This paper described a joint research project,…
  • Urban scaling arrives in archaeology

    Michael E. Smith
    16 Feb 2014 | 9:23 pm
    Urban population dynamicsThe first application of the methods of urban scaling to archaeological data was published last week (Ortman et al. 2014). This should be the first of a series of archaeological applications of urban scaling research, a trend that has the potential to revolutionize scholarly understanding of the basic processes of urbanization. While some of the discussion is pretty technical, the basic results and their implications are clear. The population sizes and areas of a large sample of ancient settlements conform to the expectations of urban scaling power laws as identified…
 
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    Middle Savagery

  • EUROTAST: A few photos from Ghana

    Colleen Morgan
    8 Apr 2014 | 1:38 am
    A few photos from around Ghana: Elmina castle and Accra. Check out the rest of the set on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/colleenmorgan/sets/72157643627864965/
  • Digital Ghosts

    Colleen Morgan
    31 Mar 2014 | 8:32 am
    (a placeholder post, of sorts) As digital archaeological workflows become common and increasingly regimented, we must ensure that there is time and space for the playful, creative exploration of the past. In this talk I will (briefly!) discuss the pushing the aesthetics and poetics of digital archaeology through collaborative research projects that emphasize lateral thinking, experimentation and making.
  • “Wonderful! Wonderful! This death!”

    Colleen Morgan
    28 Mar 2014 | 7:57 am
    The Ouse, the river I cross each day as I walk to work, has become sinister. It is impossible not to notice the flat, burbling brown ribbon threading through the center of York. It chokes our traffic over tight bridges and belches over the banks in bad weather. Since I first posted about it, the Ouse has claimed the lives of two young adults, who fell into the river during drunken nights out. I suppose it isn’t all that uncommon, cities with rivers have drowning fatalities, so I’m not sure why these deaths have animated this particular river with menace for me. As apparent from…
  • New Words Needed for Emerging Social Behaviors

    Colleen Morgan
    26 Mar 2014 | 10:41 am
    Automatic? by Gregory P. Smith That long pause when you expect automation and then realize that you have to manually work the faucet or hand dryer. When people are clustered together looking at a computer screen and the person at the keyboard has to type a password and everyone looks away to give the person “privacy.” Asking permission to smoke an e-cigarette inside. Ambiguity not conveyed by the range within “like.”
  • Alidades & Archaeology: “It’s the Bloody Steampunks!”

    Colleen Morgan
    21 Mar 2014 | 3:10 am
    The Grand Canyon survey of 1902. I have the great fortune to be next to the room with all of the departmental field kit. This office (apparently once the kitchens of King’s Manor) also hold our lovely tech specialists, and I was chatting with them while admiring the lovely wooden tripod we have in the department. The esteemed Dr. James Flexner taught me how to use an alidade in the field, and is the author of a great article on Reflexive Map-Making in Archaeological Research. Each survey method requires a slightly different approach to measuring the landscape, whether you are hitting a…
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    Looting Matters

  • James Ede responds to Christos Tsirogiannis

    David Gill
    16 Apr 2014 | 3:50 am
    London-based antiquities dealer James Ede has responded to Dr Christos Tsirogiannis in Apollo ("In Defence of the Antiquities Trade", April 11, 2014). Ede is right to suggest that the scandal  --- is there another word that could be used? --- relating to recently surfaced antiquities has been "embarrassing" for those involved in the market. And it is surely appropriate for Tsirogiannis (and others) to draw attention to the need for the application of a rigorous due diligence process to be applied to objects offered for sale.There is a suggestion by Ede that the photographic dossiers…
  • Hull Hands on History Museum

    David Gill
    15 Apr 2014 | 2:41 pm
    In November 2013 it was announced that Hull would be the UK City of Culture in 2017, beating Leicester, Dundee and Swansea Bay (see BBC News; DCMS Press Release). The news story reminded us:Phil Redmond added that the panel was "particularly impressed with Hull's evidence of community and creative engagement, their links to the private sector and their focus on legacy, including a commitment to enhance funding beyond 2017".Hull's Council Leader, Stephen Brady was also quoted:"It will give Hull a platform to tell the world what this great city has to offer, transform perceptions and accelerate…
  • "Near North Cove Hoard": valuation

    David Gill
    15 Apr 2014 | 2:26 am
    The finder of the the "Near North Cove Hoard" in Suffolk has been interviewed on the BBC website ("Suffolk Bronze Age axe and ring hoard 'undervalued'", April 12, 2014). The Bronze Age finds were discovered near Lowestoft in 2011 and their value has now been set at £550 (instead of the £6200 that the finder was expecting). The finder, Steven Walker, is quoted:"I've been metal-detecting for 15 years and this was my best ever find and my experience does not inspire confidence in the official valuation process. Unless changes are made, people aren't going to donate their treasure finds to…
  • Tsirogiannis on recent identifications

    David Gill
    3 Apr 2014 | 11:30 pm
    Dr Christos Tsirogiannis has written a short piece on the identification of Medici and Becchina pieces for Apollo ("Auction houses should do more to root out looted antiquities", April 2, 2014).Since 2007 I have been identifying antiquities, depicted while not yet conserved, in these photograph archives, before the auctions take place. Since this happens several times every year, it is not usually considered ‘newsworthy’ by sources that non-experts notice, even though the estimated value of the objects I’ve identified ranges from a few thousand to several million pounds.The surprising…
  • Bonhams and Becchina

    David Gill
    3 Apr 2014 | 1:42 pm
    Bonhams has withdrawn one of its lots from a sale. It was a Canosan pyxis that had passed through the Ariadne Galleries in New York during the 1980s. So it surfaced well after 1970, has an obvious link with Italy, and was handled by a gallery that has been linked with recently surfaced antiquities (such as the Icklingham bronzes). These would be three good reasons to conduct a thorough due diligence search.Yet an unnamed spokesperson for Bonhams is quoted by the BBC ("'Looted' artefacts removed from auction", April 2, 2014):"We take immense trouble to check and verify the history of any…
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    Theoretical Structural Archaeology

  • #BlogArch – Where is it all leading?

    Geoff Carter
    27 Mar 2014 | 9:08 pm
    Over at Doug’s Archaeology Blog the final question for next month’s #blogarch SAA session on blogging is where are you going with blogging or would you it like to go? While having spent half my lifetime working on this methodology, I have always had an end in mind, but what I have deduced from this research was utterly unexpected. The ideal end product was always envisaged as a 3D CAD model, and the internet is now the obvious place to present one. But, to cut to the chase, the core of the issue is Peer Review; While it is technically possible to publish a 3D presentation on the…
  • Ramparts and Ditches - the Roman Killing Zone

    Geoff Carter
    5 Feb 2014 | 12:51 am
     Recognizing the Timber Wall and Ditch, predating the more familiar Hadrian’s Wall, highlighted central importance of timber engineering to the Roman army in the field and took this research in an unexpected direction.While many Roman military installations are identified by their bank and ditch, as archaeological remains they are often somewhat underwhelming, certainly compared with some hill forts, but history attests to their success in withstanding assault.  The tactics behind these structures can be explored by using a simple SketchUp model of the sort of rampart and ditch…
  • #BlogArch Carnival; Most Significant post? Hadrian’s Timber Wall

    Geoff Carter
    19 Jan 2014 | 4:34 pm
    This month’s question posed for the participants in the blog archaeology Carnival over Doug’s Archaeology is fairly flexible, I have chosen; what was your most significant post?Archaeological Blogging; Inadmissible EvidenceIn terms of its significance, Hadrian’s Timber Wall is the post that stands out, as it encapsulates everything about this blog and why I created it. It is not even in the top 10 most read posts, or as contentious as those about Class Ei buildings like Stonehenge [1], but the Timber Wall was a totally new concept, an unexpected research bonus, which got worldwide…
  • The archaeology of the Imaginary Spaces

    Geoff Carter
    13 Jan 2014 | 6:30 pm
    One of the first things you learn as an archaeologist is that “History” is the study of specialist artefacts involving writing and other forms of recording, and that “Prehistory” is marked by the absence of such material. There is period we call “Proto-history”, in which “Prehistoric” issues are alluded to in later documents, providing plenty of scope for conjecture; ideas like “Druids” inhabit these spaces, along with more peripheral characters like Merlin and Arthur.Narrative History on the BBC Television is a cultural phenomenon in its own right, and while Prehistory…
  • Forthcoming 2014 Digital Exploration Season; Modelling Stonehenge and Edwin Harness.

    Geoff Carter
    7 Jan 2014 | 3:12 pm
    Blogging your own research does allow you to preview what is coming up in future posts, and demonstrate despite the long gaps between posts you are still alive and kicking. [1]My main in 2014 focus will be presenting 3D CAD models of Prehistoric roofed structures using Sketchup.When I started building CAD Models of archaeological structures in 1990, it would have been quicker to build them in balsawood, and I little dreamt that one day a tool like Sketchup would not only run on a standard desktop, but also be available for free.At present I am working on several [competing] fronts, with…
 
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    Archaeology News from Past Horizons

  • A taste of Bronze Age Brew

    Past Horizons
    18 Apr 2014 | 8:20 am
    A modern interpretation of Denmark's oldest known beer is now on sale at the Danish National Museum and is based on the residue analysis of a fermented drink from the Bronze Age
  • Community project focuses on Neolithic Whitehawk camp

    Past Horizons
    17 Apr 2014 | 8:35 am
    The Whitehawk Camp partnership has recently received £99,300 from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) for an exciting community archaeology project based in Brighton
  • Roman port of Ostia much larger than previously thought

    Past Horizons
    17 Apr 2014 | 3:54 am
    Researchers have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the ancient Roman port of Ostia, proving the city was much larger than previously estimated
  • Historical data shows impact on Cherokee skull size

    Past Horizons
    16 Apr 2014 | 12:25 pm
    Research shows that events from the Trail of Tears to the Civil War led to significant changes in the shape of skulls in the eastern and western bands of the Cherokee people
  • Unwrapping Ancient Egypt

    Past Horizons
    16 Apr 2014 | 12:06 am
    The study and popular perception of Egyptian antiquities focuses too much on the unwrapping of mummies and the use of technologies such as scanning, according to one academic
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    The Archaeology News Network

  • New city wall discovered at ancient Roman port

    16 Apr 2014 | 10:00 am
    Researchers from the universities of Southampton and Cambridge have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the ancient Roman port of Ostia, proving the city was much larger than previously estimated. Newly discovered features at Ostia [Credit: Digital Globe Inc/Portus Project]A team, led by Professor Simon Keay (Southampton) and Professor Martin Millet (Cambridge), has been conducting a survey of an area of land lying... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Oxford archaeologists unravel the past of Pattanam

    16 Apr 2014 | 9:00 am
    Oxford archaeologists working at Pattanam, located 25 km north of Kochi, have confirmed that it was an Indian port frequented by Romans and have put to rest doubts about the antiquity of the site. Oxford University archaeologists collaborate with Kerala Council for Historical Research at the Pattanam site [Credit: Thulasi Kakkat/The Hindu]If the excavations and surveys go as planned, the UK team might also have answers to questions... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Ancient Herculaneum gains ground

    16 Apr 2014 | 8:00 am
    Herculaneum, Pompeii’s “little sister”, will soon be given some much needed breathing space thanks to funds from the EU and the Herculaneum Conservation Project, a collaboration between the US-based Packard Humanities Institute and the regional heritage authority. A buffer zone is to be created with the purchase of a 5,200 sq. m plot of land  near the archaeological site [Credit: WikiCommons]A buffer zone has been created with... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Trials of the Cherokee reflected in their skulls

    16 Apr 2014 | 7:00 am
    Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Tennessee have found that environmental stressors -- from the Trail of Tears to the Civil War -- led to significant changes in the shape of skulls in the eastern and western bands of the Cherokee people. The findings highlight the role of environmental factors in shaping our physical characteristics. In 1838 and 1839, as part of Andrew Jackson's Indian removal... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Earliest ancestor of land herbivores discovered

    16 Apr 2014 | 6:30 am
    New research from the University of Toronto Mississauga demonstrates how carnivores transitioned into herbivores for the first time on land. The smallest and largest caseid: this is a reconstruction of 300-million-year-old tiny carnivorous Eocasea in the footprint of 270-million-year-old largest known herbivore of its time, Cotylorhynchus [Credit: Danielle Dufault]"The evolution of herbivory was revolutionary to life on land because... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
 
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    The Mathisen Corollary

  • A Hymn to the Setting Sun, and the ultimate mystery of life

    David Warner Mathisen
    19 Apr 2014 | 10:55 am
    The Egyptian Book of the Dead (or the Book of Going Forth by Day, as it is often called today) refers to the texts found on numerous scrolls stretching across a period of over a thousand years, with contents that have connections to the earlier Coffin Texts painted on the sarcophagi and even earlier Pyramid Texts carved into the walls of certain surviving ancient pyramids. The texts found on these scrolls are not always the same "chapters" of the Book of the Dead -- there is no single "Book of the Dead," but rather many variants found on many different scrolls, each containing a…
  • Titanic conspiracy, due diligence, natural law and mind control

    David Warner Mathisen
    13 Apr 2014 | 1:11 am
    The night of April 14 through April 15 marks the anniversary of the catastrophic sinking of the famous RMS Titanic, along with the appalling loss of over 1,500 lives in the icy waters of the North Atlantic.  After leaving the US Army and reading more about the details of the Titanic catastrophe, and in particular the contrasting actions of Captains E.J. Smith of the Titanic, Stanley Lord of the Californian, and Arthur H. Rostron of the Carpathia, I often wondered why the actions of these three captains were not used as a valuable leadership study for officers.  Later, after…
  • The horizon and the scales of judgement

    David Warner Mathisen
    12 Apr 2014 | 1:46 am
    In ancient Egyptian texts, such as the Egyptian Book of the Dead, there is much usage of the symbol of the horizon.  In the Book of the Dead, for example, the Sun-God Ra is often described as rising on the horizon, and sinking to rest on the horizon.  In the "Hymn of Praise to Ra When He Riseth Upon the Horizon, and When He Setteth in the Land of Life" (which can be found in this online transcription of E. A. Wallis Budge's translation of various Book of the Dead texts contained in the British Museum, a bit more than half-way down the very long web page, in a section entitled…
  • Did the ancients somehow know about DNA?

    David Warner Mathisen
    10 Apr 2014 | 12:22 am
    Conventional history tells us that the double-helix structure and base-pairing characteristic of the DNA molecule was not "discovered" until the twentieth century, based upon the work of scientists Rosalind Franklin, Raymond Gosling, James Watson, Francis Crick, and Erwin Chargaff, primarily in the 1950s and 1960s.Erwin Chargaff (1905-2002) in particular was responsible for the insight that DNA molecules contain roughly equal proportions of adenine and thymine (one of the "base pairs" in the DNA molecule) and of guanine and cytosine (the other "base pair").  Since that time, high school…
  • Taking your picture against your will is a violation of natural law

    David Warner Mathisen
    30 Mar 2014 | 10:26 pm
    Previously, in the post entitled "Crazy Horse against mind control," we saw that it is widely believed that Crazy Horse never allowed anyone to take his photograph.  Certainly the historian Stephen E. Ambrose believed that no one was ever allowed to take Crazy Horse's picture.  Some believe that Crazy Horse did once pose for a portrait when he was young, but even if that is the case (and it is disputed point and one that is by no means proven), it is indisputable that Crazy Horse believed that his image belonged to him and that it was not allowed to be taken without his permission.
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    Doug's Archaeology

  • Blogging Archaeology- The Final Review of #blogarch

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    6 Apr 2014 | 2:09 pm
      We have finally reached the end of the #blogarch blogging carnival. The SAA session on blogging is at the end of the month so this will be the last of the #blogarch carnival, for now. It has been an amazing run. You can see all of the responses to last months questions at there posts: November December January February So here is the roundup of the last question for #blogarch. I had asked what direction people want to take their blog or the direction that they wanted archaeology blogging in general to go. First though you should check out Shawn’s mapping of earlier #blogarch…
  • My hopes, dreams, and fears (blogging for tenure) for #BlogArch

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    1 Apr 2014 | 7:38 am
    Last week I was on the Radio with the great folks at Trowel Points and Terry discussing blogging. Aside from shameless self promotion, I recommend that you have a listen as it was an excellent session. One of the questions Joe asked us was, “does social media and blogging matter?” “Does it lead to anything?” We were talking about the Grave Looters show on National Geographic. It was last Wednesday, the story was just breaking, and I said it was to early to tell if social media could make a difference. Well, I am happy to say that only a week later they are canceling…
  • What is the use of Archaeology? Naysayers crushed by Rev. #WhyArchMatters

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    20 Mar 2014 | 7:42 am
    “But archaeology is not simply valuable as a purveyor of facts and evidences for the use of the historian. It elevates the mind of man; it enlarges his soul; it divests us of a part of our selfishness; it lifts us out of the rut of our every-day life; it makes our hearts beat in sympathy with those who cannot repay us even the “tribute of a sigh”; it educes affections which bless us and tend to make us blessings to all around, but which are apt to be dried up by too long and too intimate an acquaintance with the market-place and the exchange.” A few weeks ago I posted…
  • SEO is Killing the Internet

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    19 Mar 2014 | 4:30 am
    This post has been a long time coming but today I am finally mad enough to write it. Today I woke to another SEO email in my inbox- “Hello, I am really satisfied with your blog content, your posts are really good and you are keeping it well. I would like to publish my post on your blog (as guest post) with my website link……” It is a common tactic for SEOers (Search Engine Optimization) to try and do guest posts on other people’s blogs. When they do a guest post they will link to their or their employers websites. The reason they do this is because your website or…
  • Top Organizations Receiving NSF Archaeology Funds

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    17 Mar 2014 | 4:44 am
    Ever wonder which universities or organizations (yes, you don’t have to be a part of a university to apply) are the most successful at getting National Science Foundation funding for archaeology? Well, after some data crunching I have the numbers. Last week I looked at the top individual recipients of National Science Foundation funding for Archaeology and Archaeology related projects. I also looked at how women are under represented as PIs for that funding. This was all based off of data (or datum for British English singular) the NSF provides (data I have made available here). That…
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    Cultural Heritage Lawyer Rick St. Hilaire

  • Egypt Officially Asks U.S. for MoU to Protect Cultural Heritage

    15 Apr 2014 | 4:20 pm
    The Cultural Property Advisory Committee (CPAC) is scheduled to take up Egypt's formal request to have American import protections placed on endangered archaeological material originating from that country. The Federal Register today pre-published a notice announcing that CPAC will begin a review of Egypt's proposed Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on June 2.Temple of Isis at Philae in Egypt.CHL has been calling for greater protection of archaeological sites, religious structures, and monuments since 2011 because of increasing perils to cultural heritage in Egypt. These threats…
  • True Grit: Monica Hanna Defends Heritage in Egypt, Receives SAFE's Prize

    14 Apr 2014 | 10:30 am
    (C) SAFE. Used with permission.Khaemwaset was a royal prince who lived during the 13th century B.C. He became the first Egyptologist and was greatly revered in his time for conserving Egypt's monuments. Now a 21st century Egyptologist has been honored for preserving the past. She is archaeologist Dr. Monica Hanna, who actively searches the desert sands and the Nile banks to defend Egypt's rich heritage against looters and vandals.Saving Antiquities for Everyone (SAFE) presented the Beacon Award to Dr. Hanna Thursday night, calling her "an outstanding archaeologist and…
  • For Richer or Poorer: Commentary on The Economics of Cultural Property Laws

    9 Apr 2014 | 8:41 am
    “The Economics of Cultural Property Laws” presents a controversial study that attempts to wed archaeology--a knowledge-gathering discipline focused on exacting evidence collection, thoughtful research, and a deep concern for heritage preservation--to a production-based enterprise evaluated only by the many spectacular objects it can generate.The article, which offers more sophistry than careful study, appears in The Indonesian Journal of International & Comparative Law, Volume 1, Issue 1 (January 2014). It has gained notoriety after being published in a Los Angeles…
  • "The Law Cited by Plaintiffs Does Not Offer the Remedy They Seek" - Rubin v. Iran

    3 Apr 2014 | 9:46 am
    "The court recognizes the tragic circumstances that gave rise to the instant action, but finds that the law cited by plaintiffs does not offer the remedy they seek." With these words, Judge Robert Gettleman ended the Northern District of Illinois case of Jenny Rubin, et al. v. Islamic Republic of Iran, et al. v. The University of Chicago and The Field Museum of Natural History.The case involves American victims of a Hamas suicide bombing in Jerusalem in 1997. A federal judge in Washington, DC in 2003 awarded the plaintiffs a $71.5 million default judgment against Iran, holding that country to…
  • UPDATED > Back Again: H.R. 4292, The Foreign Cultural Exchange Immunity Clarification Act

    31 Mar 2014 | 12:20 pm
    First adopted by the U.S. House of Representative in 2012 and then left to die in the Senate, the Foreign Cultural Exchange Immunity Clarification Act (FCEICA) is back, having been reintroduced by three original sponsors along with a new co-sponsor.Judiciary Committee member Rep. Steve Chabot (R-OH) introduced H.R. 4292 on March 25 along with co-sponsors Rep. John Conyers (D-MI), Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), and Rep. Steve Cohen (D-TX). Their purpose is to amend the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (FSIA) in order to encourage foreign lending of…
 
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    The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty

  • Episode 14 “Aloha State of Mind”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    5 Apr 2014 | 5:39 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Follow @strugglingarch Aloha friends, it’s time for another episode of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty! In honor of my recent trip to Hawaii I have decided to dedicate this episode to all things Aloha, and provide an interesting journey through the history of the 50th state- from it’s volcanic inception to the tragic day that will live in infamy. I had a great time on my vacation, but I also took it as an opportunity to learn more about Polynesian culture. Since I was staying with a friend who lives in Honolulu, it was interesting…
  • Episode 13 “Pompeii’s Hottest Gladiator”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    19 Mar 2014 | 5:25 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Follow @strugglingarch Welcome friends! It’s episode 13 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty “Pompeii’s Hottest Gladiator!” In this exciting episode we talk about one of the biggest natural disasters in recorded history, the destruction of Pompeii in 79 AD. The ash tomb that has encased the city for the last 2000 years has done an incredible job of preserving every detail of life in the 1st century Roman city. We’ll discuss that fateful day as well as the long history of archaeology at the site. Also, it’s no…
  • Episode 12 “One Podcast to Rule them All!”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    14 Feb 2014 | 9:35 am
    Subscribe to my feed! Follow @strugglingarch Get ready to nerd out on the best episode of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty yet! As a huge HUGE Tolkien fan I have been dying to do an episode about the historical and cultural inspirations for the Hobbit/Lord of the Rings universe. So not ONLY will you learn more about Middle Earth, you will also be learning about the Iron/Dark Age peoples of Northern Europe whose lives and literature helped Tolkien create (in my opinion) the greatest literary canon of all time. Plus, if you hang on ‘till the end you get to hear…
  • Episode 11 “Volcano Cheetahs”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    15 Jan 2014 | 4:14 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Follow @strugglingarch Welcome back! It’s time for another exciting episode of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty, so get ready for our 11th episode “Volcano Cheetahs!” This was a fun glimpse into the world of ancient man. Ever see that movie 10,000B.C.? Well I did, and although this tale doesn’t involve an insanely beautiful blue eyed cave girls with rockin dreds running away from scary prehistoric mega-birds, it does involve the first inklings of organized cultural practices and belief systems in the desert sands of…
  • Episode 10 “Sexy Sex with Asian Dothrakis”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    24 Nov 2013 | 1:11 am
    It’s episode 10 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty- “Sexy Sex with Asian Dothrakis!” Given, those of you who share my love of Medieval era earth-like fantasy novels will get more out of this one than others- it’s still a pretty great time. We talk about genome studies revealing how surprisingly horny our ancient ancestors were, which may or may not involve a detailed Game of Thrones analogy. Then I give some advice to the newb considering how to get started with academic conferences. Number 1 priority- ignore any and all impulses to dress…
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    AntiquityNOW

  • Easter, Resurrection and Chocolate Bunnies: Social Marketing Through the Ages

    AntiquityNOW
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 am
    Easter is one of the holiest of holidays for Christians.   And with Easter’s roots in antiquity, we can see why the symbolism of this holiday continues to give succor and hope to believers today. But Easter is also a holiday … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! Green Borscht with Matzah for a Multi-Cultural Passover

    AntiquityNOW
    16 Apr 2014 | 2:00 am
    Monday night, April 14th, was the first night of Passover, the eight-day festival celebrated by Jews around the world to commemorate the emancipation of the Israelites from slavery in ancient Egypt. The start of the holiday always corresponds to the … Continue reading →
  • May Is AntiquityNOW Month! Join the Celebration!

    AntiquityNOW
    15 Apr 2014 | 2:00 am
    When we considered a commemoration in 2013, we asked ourselves a question:  Why have an AntiquityNOW month?   The answer was in our mission: to show how antiquity’s legacy influences us today and for generations to come.  So for the month of … Continue reading →
  • Music Origins: Mesopotamia, American Gospel and the Neurology of Faith, Part II

    AntiquityNOW
    10 Apr 2014 | 2:00 am
    In Part I we looked at the importance of music in Mesopotamia and its specific role in communing with the gods. Fast forwarding nearly four millennia we found a remarkable similarity in the strains of American gospel music and the belief … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! Celebrate National Grilled Cheese Month

    AntiquityNOW
    9 Apr 2014 | 2:00 am
    Cheese, cheese, glorious cheese! Cubed, shredded, sliced or melted, with more than 1,400 varieties, cheese can be savored and enjoyed in countless ways. This month is dedicated to one very special cheese-related recipe. April is National Grilled Cheese Month and … Continue reading →
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    Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica

  • Audio News for April 6 to 12, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    14 Apr 2014 | 9:00 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Science sides with Jesus’ wife papyrus (details) Ancient and medieval boats identified in Irish loch (details) Isotope profiling paints a vast and complex map of Ancestral Puebloan turquoise trade (details) Israeli salvage dig finds rare Egyptian era remains (details)
  • Audio News for March 30 to April 5, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    7 Apr 2014 | 9:47 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: New research uncovers surprising use of asbestos by Byzantine Monks (details) Aerial photography reveals exciting discoveries at Phoenician colony in Spain (details) Infrared sensing leads to new interpretations at Ancestral Puebloan settlement (details) Ancient nomads play important role in early spread of domesticated crops along Silk Road (details)
  • Audio News for March 23 to 29, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    31 Mar 2014 | 9:47 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Major ancient settlement discovered under planned outlet mall in Arizona (details) One of world’s oldest yachts found on Isle of Man (details) Roman Emperor Claudius appears as Egyptian pharaoh on temple of goddess Isis (details) Maya bashed skulls with spiked clubs (details)
  • Audio News for March 16 to 22, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    24 Mar 2014 | 10:56 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Maya excavations explore households of the elite in Belize (details) Evidence finally found from famous earlty historical battle on the Plains (details) Chicken DNA adds new details to Pacific migration history (details) Ancient soldier’s letter home sounds similar to today (details)
  • Audio News for March 9 to 15, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    17 Mar 2014 | 9:44 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Prehistoric pollen suggests humans manipulated forest landscapes of Southeast Asia 11,000 years ago (details) Differential evaporation could lead to collapse of Teotihuacan’s Pyramid of the Sun (details) 9,000 year-old bone staff etched with human faces discovered in Syria (details) Monk’s 800-year old grave eroding from cliff in South Wales (details)
 
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