Archaeology

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  • Massive prehistoric settlement unearthed in Ukraine

    Stone Pages Archaeo News
    23 Oct 2014 | 3:47 am
    A temple dating back about 6,000 years has been discovered within a massive prehistoric settlement in Ukraine. The temple is about 60 by 20 meters (197 by 66 feet) in...
  • Introducing Strata: Portraits of Humanity, online and on TV

    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek
    Rick Pettigrew
    15 Oct 2014 | 11:32 am
    Friends and colleagues: We are very excited today to launch Strata: Portraits of Humanity online and on TV! Please share this news with everyone who will listen. Unlike any other show available anywhere, Strata is a fresh monthly showcase for unique, captivating and diverse stories about our cultural heritage from an archaeological perspective. Besides that, it’s just plain fun to watch! We produce some of the segments ourselves and acquire the rest from our dozens of producer and distributor partners around the world. Our stories come from across the globe, ranging from North America to…
  • Answers from the land of dreams

    The Mathisen Corollary
    David Warner Mathisen
    19 Oct 2014 | 12:56 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (linkOne very strong reason to suspect that the "Star Myth hypothesis" is correct is the predictive power of the model. If the world's mythologies and sacred traditions are in fact built upon a common system of celestial metaphor, then it should be possible to examine an unfamiliar or previously unexamined myth or sacred story and, based upon knowledge of the general system and familiarity with the types of clues that are typically present (plus familiarity with the general characteristics of the most important constellations and the characteristics of the zodiac…
  • US Government Pays $425,000 for Legal Case

    Looting Matters
    David Gill
    22 Oct 2014 | 3:07 pm
    It now appears that the US Government has had to pay $425,000 in legal fees and costs to the St Louis Art Museum (Jenna Greence, "Feds Lose Fight Over Ancient Mummy Mask", National Law Journal October 21, 2014).The mask was purchased for $499,000 in 1998.Pat McInerney of Dentons and Husch Blackwell was quoted:"The Mask of Ka-Nefer-Nefer was a fascinating case that ultimately showed the extent to which the government unfortunately overreached in an attempt to literally take an artifact from the Saint Louis Art Museum using a lawsuit the court said was ‘completely devoid of any facts’…
  • Who Digs? Craft & Non-specialist labor in archaeology

    Middle Savagery
    colleenmorgan
    9 Oct 2014 | 11:24 am
    Dan and I wrote a short polemic for Bill Caraher’s series on Craft and Archaeology. It was a hydra of a piece to write–we wanted to be succinct and direct, but it kept spiraling out of control. We obviously have a lot more to say on the subject, here’s a short excerpt: Digging is the most evocative archaeological practice, yet it is the most undervalued mode of archaeological knowledge production, least cultivated skill with fewest monetary rewards, and is considered so inconsequential that non-specialist labor is regularly employed to uncover our most critical data sets.
 
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    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine

  • 17th-Century Vaults Unearthed in 13th-Century Irish Church

    24 Oct 2014 | 2:30 pm
    CORK, IRELAND—Subsidence in the aisle at St. Mary’s Collegiate Church in Youghal, a prosperous medieval port town, has led to the discovery of three burial vaults dating to the seventeenth century. The church, which was built in 1250, is the oldest continuously used church in Ireland. “We have unearthed some pottery and coins from the seventeenth century and a fabulous underground central heating system which was modelled on the Roman aqua duct system. It dates to the eighteenth century and boiling water was poured in to provide the heating,” archaeologist Caroline Desmond told The…
  • Dental Health in Roman Britain Studied

    24 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    LONDON, ENGLAND—Only five percent of Roman Britons had severe gum disease, despite the prevalence of infections, abscesses, and tooth decay in their smiles, according to a study conducted by a team made of researchers from King’s College London and London’s Natural History Museum. They examined 303 skulls recovered from a cemetery in Dorset. Most of these people had died in their 40s sometime between 200 and 400 A.D. “The amount of severe gum disease around today is around one third of the population. But much to our surprise these people didn’t have a lot of gum disease, but they…
  • Ancient Burial Mounds Looted in Denmark

    24 Oct 2014 | 1:30 pm
    GRINDSTED, DENMARK—Police are investigating the destruction of four ancient burial sites in southeast Jutland, according to a report in The Copenhagen Post. The protected graves were estimated to be 4,000 years old. Similar burials have contained stone axes, jewelry, and pottery. This is the first time graves in Denmark have been plundered since the end of the 1890s. “The things we could have learned from the burial mounds have now been erased from history. We can no longer investigate how ancient life was in this area of Jutland,” said archaeologist Lars Bjarke Christensen of the…
  • Golden Horde City Excavated in Russia

    24 Oct 2014 | 1:00 pm
    ISTANBUL, TURKEY—A thirteenth-century city founded by Batu Khan, a descendant of Genghis Khan, is being excavated in Russia. Located along the Volga River, this prosperous city, known as Ukek, was part of the Golden Horde kingdom, which controlled many of the Silk Road trade routes connecting China and Europe. Christianity, Islam, and Shamanism were all practiced in Ukek. Archaeologists from the Saratov Regional Museum of Local Lore are currently excavating two temples in the city’s Christian quarter. The earlier temple had a tile roof and was decorated inside and out with murals and…
  • Rapa Nui Genes Suggest Pre-Columbian Voyage

    23 Oct 2014 | 2:30 pm
    OSLO, NORWAY—Evidence for contact between Polynesians from Easter Island and South Americans sometime before 1500 A.D. has been found in the genomes of 27 living Rapa Nui islanders, according to a report in Science. European and Native American DNA patterns were found in the modern Rapa Nui genomes. The Native American DNA patterns accounted for about eight percent of the Rapa Nui genomes, and they were broken up and scattered, suggesting that genetic recombination had been at work on the material for some time. The relatively intact sections of European genetic patterns were unevenly…
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    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Genomic data support early contact between Easter Island and Americas

    23 Oct 2014 | 10:16 am
    People may have been making their way from Easter Island to the Americas well before Dutch commander Jakob Roggeveen arrived in 1722, according to new genomic evidence showing that the Rapanui people living on that most isolated of islands had significant contact with Native American populations hundreds of years earlier. The findings lend the first genetic support for such an early trans-Pacific route between Polynesia and the Americas, a trek of more than 4,000 kilometers.
  • Hippos-Sussita excavation: Silent evidence of the earthquake of 363 CE

    23 Oct 2014 | 7:04 am
    Silent evidence of a large earthquake in 363 CE -- the skeleton of a woman with a dove-shaped pendant -- was discovered under the tiles of a collapsed roof by archeologists from the University of Haifa during this excavation season at Hippos-Sussita. They also found a large muscular marble leg and artillery ammunition from some 2,000 years ago. "The data is finally beginning to form a clear historical-archaeological picture," said Dr. Michael Eisenberg, head of the international excavation team.
  • Ancient Europeans intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agriculture

    21 Oct 2014 | 9:59 am
    By analyzing DNA from petrous bones of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified these peoples remained intolerant to lactose (natural sugar in the milk of mammals) for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultural practices. The scientific team examined nuclear ancient DNA extracted from thirteen individuals from burials from archaeological sites in the Great Hungarian Plain. The skeletons sampled date from 5,700 BC (Early Neolithic) to 800 BC (Iron Age).
  • Roman Gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank a tonic of ashes after training

    20 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    Roman gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank ashes after training as a tonic. These are the findings of anthropological investigations carried out on bones of warriors found during excavations in the ancient city of Ephesos.
  • Mummy remains refute antiquity of ankylosing spondylitis

    20 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic disease that causes inflammation in the spinal joints and was thought to have affected members of the ancient Egyptian royal families. Now a new study refutes that claim, finding instead a degenerative spinal condition called diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) in royal Egyptian mummies from the 18th to early 20th Dynasties.
 
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    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek

  • Introducing Strata: Portraits of Humanity, online and on TV

    Rick Pettigrew
    15 Oct 2014 | 11:32 am
    Friends and colleagues: We are very excited today to launch Strata: Portraits of Humanity online and on TV! Please share this news with everyone who will listen. Unlike any other show available anywhere, Strata is a fresh monthly showcase for unique, captivating and diverse stories about our cultural heritage from an archaeological perspective. Besides that, it’s just plain fun to watch! We produce some of the segments ourselves and acquire the rest from our dozens of producer and distributor partners around the world. Our stories come from across the globe, ranging from North America to…
  • Strata: Portraits of Humanity premieres on Oct. 15th!

    Rick Pettigrew
    2 Oct 2014 | 10:12 am
    Strata: Portraits of Humanity is The Archaeology Channel's all new monthly show featuring handpicked stories from the world of cultural heritage! The show will be available on the TAC website archaeologychannel.org, 26 local cable stations across the country, and on Comcast OnDemand in western Oregon and western Washington. Watch the preview below and tune in on Oct. 15th for the full episode!
  • Academia.edu

    Smoke Pfeiffer
    28 Sep 2014 | 6:39 pm
    A great way to disseminate an obscure archaeological publication is to scan them in and upload to Academia.edu Academia.Edu
  • The September edition of the Video News from TAC, online and on TV

    Rick Pettigrew
    15 Sep 2014 | 2:12 pm
    Friends and colleagues: The latest installment of the Video News from TAC features the following story: * Filmmaker Tashi Wangchuk followed Tsering Dorjee, exiled Tibetan folk artist, for about six months with a camera to make a film about displaced Tibetans in exile. This film is a real life story about Dorjee and his initiative in passing down centuries-old Tibetan literature and performing arts that are being erased inside Tibet to the Tibetan younger generation in the San Francisco Bay area. He does this through the community’s Sunday school and the school’s annual day event, which…
  • Calling all teachers and students!

    Rick Pettigrew
    5 Sep 2014 | 4:01 pm
    At ALI we are attempting to gain a better understanding of our audience and want to know how many of you are teachers or students! If you are a teacher or student and use TAC for educational purposes, please submit a comment below stating how and what you use TAC for! THANK YOU!
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    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog

  • Job Opportunity: Faculty Position in Southeast Asian History, NYU Abu Dhabi

    noelbynature
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:28 am
    NYU Abu Dhabi has a Faculty Position open for Southeast Asian History, with a targeted appointment for September 2015. NYU Abu Dhabi is currently inviting applications for a tenured or tenure-track appointment at any level (assistant, associate, or full professor) for its History Program. Applicants should offer a special area of research and teaching dealing with any historical period concerning Southeast Asia. We are seeking historians with an active research and publishing agenda, and a demonstrated commitment to undergraduate teaching. Please visit the History Program’s website for more…
  • Cham people observe annual Kate festival

    noelbynature
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:19 am
    The Cham people observe the annual Kate Festival in commemoration of their gods and ancestors. Cham Towers in Ninh Thuan Province. Source: Viet Nam News 20141024 Cham people hold annual festival Viet Nam News, 24 October 2014 Thousands of ethnic Cham and tourists travelled to the Po Inu Nagar Temple, Po Klong Garai Tower and Po Rome Tower in the central province of Ninh Thuan to celebrate the traditional Kate festival that kicked off yesterday. The festival, the largest on the Cham calendar, pays respect to the gods and makes offerings to ancestors, along with wishes for favorable weather,…
  • Vandalised statue returns to Bayon

    noelbynature
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:09 am
    The statue that was destroyed by a recalcitrant tourist earlier this month is re-installed in the Bayon with a Buddhist ceremony. Statue Smashed by Tourist Returned to Bayon Temple Cambodia Daily, 24 October 2014 The Apsara Authority on Thursday returned a statue of the Buddha to its place in Bayon temple at the Angkor Archaeological Park after a tourist smashed it earlier this month. The woman, Willemijn Vermaat, a Dutch national living in New Zealand, told local media in New Zealand that a voice in her head told her to break the statue because it was in a temple dedicated to the wrong…
  • CFP: SEASREP 20th Anniversary Conference 2015

    noelbynature
    23 Oct 2014 | 6:58 am
    Readers may be interested in this conference, with some themes pertinent to archaeology. Celebrating 20 Years of SEASREP and Southeast Asian Studies University of Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia 4-5 November 2015 SEASREP will commemorate its 20thanniversary with an international conference, Celebrating 20 Years of SEASREP and Southeast Asian Studies,at the University of Gadjah Mada in Yogyakarta, Indonesia on 4-5 November 2015. The conference is supported by the Toyota Foundation and the Japan Foundation Asia Center (Tokyo). The conference aims to reflect upon the achievements of SEASREP…
  • Tales of the Hobbit

    noelbynature
    23 Oct 2014 | 6:41 am
    Another story commemorating the 10th anniversary of the Hobbit discovery; Nature interviews the key researchers behind the find. The discovery of Homo floresiensis: Tales of the hobbit Nature.com, 22 October 2014 The hobbit team did not set out to find a new species. Instead, the researchers were trying to trace how ancient people travelled from mainland Asia to Australia. At least that was the idea when they began digging in Liang Bua, a large, cool cave in the highlands of Flores in Indonesia. The team was led by archaeologists Mike Morwood and Raden Soejono, who are now deceased. Fulls…
 
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    Publishing Archaeology

  • Open Access Week

    Michael E. Smith
    19 Oct 2014 | 1:13 pm
    This coming week is "Open Access Week". Check out the central website, called Open access week. The promise and importance of open access was one of the main reasons I started this blog in 2007. Over the years I think I have grown cynical about the lack of progress in open access on most fronts, but I remain committed to the concept. I was asked by librarian Anali Perry to respond to several questions about open access; my responses (and several others) will be posted on the library website this week. Here are my replies: What is your experience with open access publishing?I write about…
  • How to make a weak argument

    Michael E. Smith
    12 Oct 2014 | 3:59 pm
    Suppose you are writing up some archaeological results. You will be making a bunch of arguments--statements that draw on data and theory to come to some conclusion of interest. Most works contain a number of arguments, often at different levels. For example you make claim that you found 41 pieces of obsidian in the lowest level and only 14 in the uppermost level. This is an argument, but it is not a particularly interesting one. You may later make a more interesting argument suggesting that the decline in obsidian was due to changing commercial routes that now avoided your site, or perhaps…
  • How would you know if you are wrong?

    Michael E. Smith
    7 Oct 2014 | 9:31 pm
    I haven't been posting lately. I've been busy running a bunch of research projects, and I'm teaching a new grad seminar on theory in archaeology. We've finished with the epistemology part of the class (what is theory? how to you construct a good argument? what is an explanation? how should you use analogy?), and have started on the theory part. We are focusing on theory that can be applied archaeologically, and on how one goes about applying theory.One benefit of the epistemology part of the class is that it has helped me organize my thoughts, and given me a better understanding of just what…
  • Breakthrough discovery!

    Michael E. Smith
    5 Aug 2014 | 11:31 am
    Scientists have discovered the earliest retraction of a scientific work, back in the Upper Paleolithic. Check this out at Retraction Watch.
  • Authorship: Who gets credit?

    Michael E. Smith
    3 Aug 2014 | 6:17 pm
    "Piled Higher and Deeper" by Jorge Cham www.phdcomics.com  Several things have gotten me thinking about issues of authorship. I've been publishing quite a bit with student co-authors lately, so this is an active topic with me and my students. In fact, authorship is most commonly a topic of concern when students are involved. Should students get authorship credit on published articles? How is this determined? Many professional societies have explicit principles and guidelines about this. The Society for American Archaeology evidently does not have any guidelines. The American…
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    Middle Savagery

  • Who Digs? Craft & Non-specialist labor in archaeology

    colleenmorgan
    9 Oct 2014 | 11:24 am
    Dan and I wrote a short polemic for Bill Caraher’s series on Craft and Archaeology. It was a hydra of a piece to write–we wanted to be succinct and direct, but it kept spiraling out of control. We obviously have a lot more to say on the subject, here’s a short excerpt: Digging is the most evocative archaeological practice, yet it is the most undervalued mode of archaeological knowledge production, least cultivated skill with fewest monetary rewards, and is considered so inconsequential that non-specialist labor is regularly employed to uncover our most critical data sets.
  • Book Review: Archaeographies

    colleenmorgan
    8 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Real Estate Open House, by Fotis Ifantidis My review of Fotis Ifantidis’ Archaeographies came out in the Journal of Contemporary Archaeology. I’m not sure why there aren’t figures, but oh well. A quote from the review: Out of the thousands of photographs taken at Dispilio, Ifantidis has selected examples that are, on the surface, aggressively non-archaeological. These photographs do not effectively document the archaeological record in a way that is acceptable as standard site photography: scales, when deployed, are haphazard, artifacts are scattered and in partial focus,…
  • 50 Years of Visualization at Çatalhöyük

    colleenmorgan
    7 Oct 2014 | 9:14 am
    As I previously mentioned, Jason Quinlan and I co-presented a poster at this year’s EAA in Istanbul. While it isn’t quite as brilliant as Alison Akins’ Plague Poster, I enjoyed putting something together about the photography at Çatalhöyük, especially with one of the primary photographers involved! Regardless, I’ve put our poster below. Of particular note is the immense increase in the size of the archive after Photoscan was introduced at Çatalhöyük. Jason and I collaborated on this remotely, and so there is some funny bits with converting between iterations of…
  • Punks, Hard Drives & Minecraft Archaeology

    colleenmorgan
    30 Sep 2014 | 6:31 am
    The inimitable Sara Perry and I have been working on the archaeological excavation of a hard drive, for science! We’ve been writing about it on Savage Minds, the Other blog about Savages. Here are the blog posts in order: What Archaeologists Do What Archaeologists Do: Between Archaeology and Media Archaeology What Archaeologists Do: Research Design and the Media Archaeology Drive Project (MAD-P) What Archaeologists Do: The Site Report & What it Means to Excavate a Hard Drive I’m also very excited that the Punk Archaeology volume has landed, be sure to download…
  • Notes on Getting Your Whole Life Stolen

    colleenmorgan
    17 Sep 2014 | 8:23 am
    “It’s Not the Same” by Jonathan on Flickr At the European Association for Archaeologists this year, our rented flat was broken into and a lot…a LOT of stuff was stolen, from me and the other archaeologists we were staying with. We’re still sorting everything out with the police, Airbnb, and insurance, but I thought I’d document a few things that I’ve learned. I had Prey and Find My Iphone installed on my Macbook pro, ipad and iphone. While I will install them again on my new equipment, they are not much good against savvy thieves. We actually were…
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    Looting Matters

  • James Cuno Revives "Culture Wars"

    David Gill
    23 Oct 2014 | 1:58 pm
    I have been unimpressed by James Cuno's attempts to be a commentator on the looting of archaeological sites. I have reviewed his works elsewhere:Who Owns Antiquity? (2008) [academia.edu]Who Owns Culture? (2009) [academia.edu]Museums Matter (2011) [academia.edu]Now Cuno has decided to reopen the discussion with an essay, "Culture Wars: The Case Against Repatriating Museum Artifacts
", Foreign Affairs November / December 2014.Cuno overlooks some issues that are very relevant to the debate about repatriation. What about the Egyptian material from the Tomb of Tetatki that had been acquired by…
  • US Government Pays $425,000 for Legal Case

    David Gill
    22 Oct 2014 | 3:07 pm
    It now appears that the US Government has had to pay $425,000 in legal fees and costs to the St Louis Art Museum (Jenna Greence, "Feds Lose Fight Over Ancient Mummy Mask", National Law Journal October 21, 2014).The mask was purchased for $499,000 in 1998.Pat McInerney of Dentons and Husch Blackwell was quoted:"The Mask of Ka-Nefer-Nefer was a fascinating case that ultimately showed the extent to which the government unfortunately overreached in an attempt to literally take an artifact from the Saint Louis Art Museum using a lawsuit the court said was ‘completely devoid of any facts’…
  • Ka-Nefer-Nefer Mummy Mask: the unanswered questions

    David Gill
    22 Oct 2014 | 7:55 am
    Paul Barford has drawn attention to the response by SLAM's legal team to the conclusion of the two parallel legal cases.Patrick McInerney will need to explain when his client was first informed that the Ka-Nefer-Nefer mask was derived from Saqqara. How did curators at SLAM respond? Then there is the issue of when (or if) SLAM contacted the Egyptian SCA about the mask. And was the Director of SLAM ever advised to contact Zahi Hawass about the acquisition and the Saqqara link? Did the curator responsible for the acquisition provide misleading or inaccurate information to the Cairo Museum? How…
  • Cultural Heritage Ethics: Between Theory and Practice

    David Gill
    16 Oct 2014 | 7:49 am
    "Cultural Heritage Ethics provides cutting-edge arguments built on case studies of cultural heritage and its management in a range of geographical and cultural contexts. Moreover, the volume feels the pulse of the debate on heritage ethics by discussing timely issues such as access, acquisition, archaeological practice, curatorship, education, ethnology, historiography, integrity, legislation, memory, museum management, ownership, preservation, protection, public trust, restitution, human rights, stewardship, and tourism."
  • Looting In Syria

    David Gill
    16 Oct 2014 | 6:48 am
    David Kohn has a useful article on looting in Syria ("ISIS's looting campaign", New Yorker October 14, 2014). He notes damage to sites such as Apamea and Dura-Europos. Interestingly the antiquities are apparently moved through Turkey.Once the artifacts are out of the ground, they’re sold by second-hand dealers. Daniels said that many of the looted items, which include gold and silver coins, mosaics, figurines, jewelry, cylinder seals, and tablets, end up for sale in towns near the Turkish-Syrian border.So should we be on the look out for Late Roman mosaics that are associated with classical…
 
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    Stone Pages Archaeo News

  • Massive prehistoric settlement unearthed in Ukraine

    23 Oct 2014 | 3:47 am
    A temple dating back about 6,000 years has been discovered within a massive prehistoric settlement in Ukraine. The temple is about 60 by 20 meters (197 by 66 feet) in...
  • Neolithic barbeque pit found in Cyprus

    23 Oct 2014 | 3:47 am
    Archaeologists have uncovered what could be a prehistoric barbeque pit used by large bands of hunters at the Prastio-Mesorotsos site in Cyprus. According to the antiquities department, the team of...
  • 5000-year-old cave paintings discovered in Russia

    23 Oct 2014 | 3:46 am
    Russian archaeologists have discovered ancient cave paintings dating back to 3000 BC in a gorge in southern Russia. "A few days ago we found five drawings, fairly large fragments, on...
  • New settlement found in Arizona desert

    20 Oct 2014 | 1:53 am
    In the northeast corner of Arizona (USA) is an area known as the Arizona Petrified Forest National Park. The forest in question is actually over 200 million years old and...
  • Tracing our ancestors at the bottom of the sea

    20 Oct 2014 | 1:52 am
    A specialist group of European researchers are studying the remains of prehistoric human settlements which are now submerged beneath our coastal seas. Some of these drowned sites are tens of...
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    Archaeology News from Past Horizons

  • Egypt’s new generation of archaeologists

    Past Horizons
    24 Oct 2014 | 6:45 am
    Young experts bring fresh ideas to help reform institutions in charge of Egyptian heritage.
  • High altitude Pleistocene sites identified in the Peruvian Andes

    Past Horizons
    24 Oct 2014 | 1:17 am
    Research conducted at the highest-altitude Pleistocene archaeological sites yet identified in the world sheds new light on the capacity of humans to survive in extreme environments.
  • Genome sequence of 45,000 year-old Siberian

    Past Horizons
    22 Oct 2014 | 12:54 pm
    In 2008, a relatively complete human femur was discovered on the banks of the river Irtysh near the village of Ust’-Ishim in western Siberia. Radiocarbon dating of the bone showed it to be about 45,000 years old.
  • Inscription dedicated to Emperor Hadrian uncovered in Jerusalem

    Past Horizons
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:48 am
    A large fragment of stone engraved with an official Latin inscription dedicated to the Roman emperor Hadrian, is being hailed as an important discovery for understanding the history of Jerusalem nearly two thousand years ago.
  • European farmers were still lactose intolerant after 5,000 years

    Past Horizons
    21 Oct 2014 | 8:46 am
    By analysing DNA extracted from the petrous bones of skulls of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified that these peoples remained intolerant to lactose (natural sugar in the milk of mammals) for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultural practices and 4,000 years after the onset of cheese-making among Central European Neolithic farmers.
 
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    The Archaeology News Network

  • 2014 excavations at Erimi-Laonin completed

    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    The Department of Antiquities, Cyprus, has announced the completion of the 2014 fieldwork season undertaken by the Italian Archaeological Mission, Università degli Studi di Firenze, at Erimi, at the site of Erimi-Laonin tou Porakou. This year’s investigations took place from July 21st August 18th  2014. Finds from chamber tomb 428 at Erimi-Laonin tou Porakou  [Credit: Department of Antiquities of Cyprus]The Bronze Age... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Earliest modern human sequenced

    22 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    A research team led by Svante Paabo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has sequenced the genome of a 45,000-year-old modern human male from western Siberia. The Ust'-Ishim femur [Credit: Bence Viola, MPI EVA]The comparison of his genome to the genomes of people that lived later in Europe and Asia show that he lived close in time to when the ancestors of present-day people in Europe and... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Hobbit mystery endures a decade on

    22 Oct 2014 | 5:45 am
    On 27 October 2004, a team of scientists in Australia and Indonesia revealed the discovery of a 1-metre-tall, tiny-brained relative of modern humans. They described it in two Nature papers as a new species, Homo floresiensis. It had lived as recently as 18,000 years ago on the Indonesian island of Flores. A reconstruction of a Homo floresiensis head  [Credit: Wikimedia Commons]For the tenth anniversary of that announcement,... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Acropolis Museum to put the daily lives of the ancients on display

    22 Oct 2014 | 5:30 am
    Until now, visitors to the Acropolis Museum in Athens could only peer through the glass floors of the Bernard Tschumi-designed structure to get an idea of the ancient neighborhood lying among the building’s foundations. A new wing will be added to the Acropolis Museum when the excavated area lying beneath  its ground level is opened to the public to showcase the history of an Athenian  neighbourhood between the third... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Deinocheirus mirificusone has been recreated in 3D

    22 Oct 2014 | 4:30 am
    A huge hump-backed 'ostrich' dinosaur, taller than a London bus and with arms eight feet (2.4 metres) long tipped with razor sharp claws, has been modelled based on Mongolia fossils. Reconstruction of Deinocheirus mirificus  [Credit: Yuong-Nam Lee (KIGAM)]Two almost complete skeletons - which included the remains of digested fish in the belly of one - have helped build an accurate picture of the lifestyle of mysterious... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    The Mathisen Corollary

  • The Arabian Nights: can you unlock their celestial metaphors?

    David Warner Mathisen
    24 Oct 2014 | 2:30 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).Richard Francis Burton (1821 - 1890) "was one of those Victorians whose energy and achievements make any modern man quail," in the words of the novelist A. S. Byatt in the introduction to Burton's translation of the Thousand Nights and a Night, also commonly known as the Thousand and One Nights, or the Arabian Nights (xv). A partial list of examples ensues, of course:He lived like one of his own heroes, travelling in Goa, Equatorial Africa, brazil, India, and the Middle East. He took part in the Crimean war. He went with J. H. Speke to find the source…
  • Welcome to new visitors from Truth Warrior! (and returning friends)

    David Warner Mathisen
    20 Oct 2014 | 11:59 pm
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).Welcome to all new visitors who are here because they heard this evening's show on Truth Warrior, and to returning friends! If you were able to listen live I hope you enjoyed the conversation, and for those who wish to listen to the archived show or download it to a mobile device or disc for listening on the move, the links below will help you to do that.Special thanks to host David Whitehead, who expertly steered the discussion to some very interesting and important areas of investigation. To listen to the program, you can wait a bit for it to show up on…
  • Coming up! LIVE! On Truth Frequency Radio

    David Warner Mathisen
    19 Oct 2014 | 10:49 am
    Live! This Monday night, October 20, 2014 at 10:00 pm Eastern, 9:00 pm Central, and 7:00 pm Pacific time, don't miss a conversation between host David Whitehead of Truth Frequency Radio and Undying Stars author David Mathisen!Of course, the show will also be available on the web afterwards for listening at any time, downloading to a mobile device, etc. But, if you want to participate in the conversation with questions or comments, be sure to tune in live at www.truthfrequencyradio.com or your local station if it carries the show. The call-in number for the program will be…
  • Answers from the land of dreams

    David Warner Mathisen
    19 Oct 2014 | 12:56 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (linkOne very strong reason to suspect that the "Star Myth hypothesis" is correct is the predictive power of the model. If the world's mythologies and sacred traditions are in fact built upon a common system of celestial metaphor, then it should be possible to examine an unfamiliar or previously unexamined myth or sacred story and, based upon knowledge of the general system and familiarity with the types of clues that are typically present (plus familiarity with the general characteristics of the most important constellations and the characteristics of the zodiac…
  • Clothing spirit with matter and raising it up again

    David Warner Mathisen
    18 Oct 2014 | 6:41 am
    Jacob Karlins founded Selfless Self Help to teach meditation for everyone and to help them to integrate meditation into their daily lives, with an emphasis on reconnecting with the natural world around us by meditating in nature and exploring how nature can be part of their personal growth.He reached out to me to ask if I wouldn't mind, since I've been writing about metaphor here on the blog, writing something about metaphor itself: its use and power, and the meaning of metaphor. It was a subject I was happy to consider more closely -- and the best way to consider something more closely, of…
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    Doug's Archaeology

  • In Open Access Publishing There Are No Free Lunches….. but it is really really cheap.

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    23 Oct 2014 | 3:59 pm
    In my last post, I mentioned that not all Open Access publishing involves authors paying $2,000. In fact, many journals neither charge the authors or readers and if they do some will waive fees. This led to this very thoughtful comment from Anders- “Excellent that there are OA publishers that do not charge the authors an APC, and that the review process is independent of payment. However, that does raise another question. If the journal offer the same service as we (at least I) have been used to, that is things like professional peer review, archiving, indexing, PR (see also the blog…
  • Open Access Does NOT equal You, the Author, Paying

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    20 Oct 2014 | 3:16 pm
    Open Access hurts young scholars, people from poor countries, people not working in Universities, and those in poor disciplines, like Archaeology, etc. etc. etc. because they can’t afford paying $2,000, $3,000, $10,000 to get published in OA publications. I have my suspicions about how this rumor got started. Critics of Open Access, like Jeffrey Beall, mention some of these issues in tirades* against Open Access. But, probably 99% of people who publish in scholarly journals do not actually follow the debate about scholarly publishing. I highly suspect that most of you feel this way…
  • Around the Archaeology Blog-o-sphere Digest #7

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:05 am
    Here is my weekly list of blog posts from Archaeology blogs/ blogs that focus on Archaeology. I have added a couple of more blogs to the list so some more new reading. Purpose I am highlighting some of the other archeo-blogs out there by collecting all their posts from the previous week . Hopefully, you find some of the posts interesting and/or find a new blog to follow. Source I took these posts from my now updated list of archaeology blogs (415+ and counting). There are a few blogs that should be in this list that are missing — hoping to fix that. Here are this weeks posts–…
  • Around the Archaeology Blog-o-sphere Digest #6

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    12 Oct 2014 | 5:19 am
    Here is my weekly list of blog posts from Archaeology blogs/ blogs that focus on Archaeology. Purpose I am highlighting some of the other archeo-blogs out there by collecting all their posts from the previous week . Hopefully, you find some of the posts interesting and/or find a new blog to follow. Source I took these posts from my now updated list of archaeology blogs (415+ and counting). There are a few blogs that should be in this list that are missing — hoping to fix that. Here are this weeks posts– prehistories.wordpress.com British Folk Art theheritagealliance.org.uk Heritage…
  • Tracing Finds: A Case Study in Crowdfunding Archaeology

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    8 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    This series started out because Thomas sent me a link to his paper on crowdfunding archaeology, on account I had wrote some blog posts on the subject several years ago (Here and here). I have just received another publication from Emmi Koivisto- Crowdfunding: The future of archaeology in Finland? It is a Master Thesis that looks at the Tracing Finds crowdfunding project. It is also up on Academia and free to view at this link- https://www.academia.edu/8648470/Crowdfunding_The_future_of_archaeology_in_Finland It is an excellent behind the scenes look at a crowdfuning project. Emmi…
 
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    Cultural Heritage Lawyer Rick St. Hilaire

  • Terrorism and Financial Intelligence Undersecretary Points to Antiquities Trafficking as a Source of ISIS Funding

    23 Oct 2014 | 7:22 pm
    David CohenSource: U.S. TreasuryThe Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) earns most of its cash from oil revenues, approximately $1 million per day. But the terror group also profits from crimes that include heritage trafficking."They lay waste to thousands of years of civilization in Iraq and Syria by looting and selling antiquities," David Cohen said today.As the federal government's point-man in charge of uncovering and blocking financial support for terrorist groups, Under Secretary Cohen's insight on the topic should be given considerable weight. Since 2011, Attorney Cohen has served…
  • Conflict and the Heritage Trade: Rise in U.S. Imports of Middle East "Antiques" and "Collectors' Pieces" Raises Questions

    6 Oct 2014 | 4:30 am
    American imports of art, collections and collectors' pieces, and antiques from Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria, and Turkey increased sharply between 2011 and 2013, prompting questions about whether trafficked heritage has piggybacked onto the mainstream marketplace.War, mass looting, and other grave threats to heritage greatly expand the risk that smuggled cultural contraband will slide into the stream of international commerce undetected. Because art and antiquities transactions often lack transparency or fail to exercise rigorous due diligence, examining…
  • Stipulation Puts a Lid on Litigation Over Roman Sarcophagus Cover Featured in the Becchina Archive

    22 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    The Roman sarcophagus lid. ICEA marble Roman sarcophagus lid is expected to be forfeited and returned to Italy after federal prosecutors and the potential claimant signed a stipulation last week.Litigation over the sculptured coffin cover--the so-called Defendant in rem--was avoided when the parties finalized their September 14 agreement over the stolen cultural object, which features in the Becchina archiveThe stipulation filed in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York recites in part:WHEREAS, Mr. [Noriyoshi] Horiuchi [of Tokyo,…
  • Register Now for the Sixth Annual Cultural Heritage Law Moot Court Competition

    21 Sep 2014 | 6:51 am
    The Lawyers’ Committee for Cultural Heritage Preservation and DePaul College of Law have opened registration for the Sixth Annual Cultural Heritage Law Moot Court Competition.Chicago-Kent College of Law won the fifth annual event that focused on trafficked heritage. Who will win next?The 2015 competition will argue constitutional challenges to the Visual Artists Rights Act of 1990 (VARA), 17 U.S.C. § 106A, which protects visual artists’ moral rights of attribution and integrity.Oral Arguments are scheduled for February 27 and 28, 2015 at the United States Court of…
  • Conservator's Records To Be Subpoenaed As Prosecutors Score Triple Victory in Peruvian Artifacts Forfeiture Cases

    16 Sep 2014 | 3:30 am
    Federal prosecutors recently scored three court victories in two forfeiture actions and one subpoena case involving allegedly contraband Peruvian artifacts.A federal magistrate in New Mexico recommended that a conservator, who may have handled contraband objects, turn over his business records to prosecutors under subpoena, a decision that certainly will attract attention among conservation professionals since they are rarely the subject of cultural property claims filed by the government.A federal judge in Miami, meanwhile, ruled that the two cases seeking to forfeit the Peruvian objects…
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    The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty

  • Episode 19 “Caen you handle this? It’s France, part Deux!”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    2 Oct 2014 | 11:50 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back to The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty! This is episode 19 of the podcast “Caen you handle this? It’s France, part Deux!” In this, the second installment of Jenny’s French adventures, we talk about my time in Paris and the Normandy region. Some of the things I waxed on about in this episode include: What’s up with city planning and historical relevance in Paris? Saint Denis Paris? Really? His name is Denis… Jenny’s movie recommendation for the month: Midnight in Paris Guess the obscure musical…
  • Béarnaise Awesome-Sauce

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:17 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Bonjour mes amis! Et bienvenue to episode 18 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty, “Béarnaise Awesome-Sauce!” You may have noticed that I’ve been gone for the last three weeks (yeah, sorry about that), well it’s because I’ve been in France! So I thought now that I’ve returned to my native soil I would tell you all about my travels and the fun and fascinating things I learned while exploring the beautiful land of baguettes, burgundy, and béarnaise sauce! This will be a two-part series because there’s…
  • Episode 17 “Great Odin’s Raven- it’s Archaeology 101!

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    5 Jul 2014 | 5:48 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Hi friends, welcome to Episode 17 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty Podcast “Great Odin’s Raven-it’s Archaeology 101!” In this fun filled episode we tackle some of the basics of excavation, with a focus on why archaeology and geology are old friends- and how this makes us better at what we do. It’s like taking that Archaeology 101 class you never got around to in college! (Unless you actually did take that class, then it’s more of a review of things you probably already know…sorry). In this new…
  • Episode 16 “Go West, Young (Wo)Man!”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    13 Jun 2014 | 2:26 am
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back friends! It’s another fantabulous episode of basically the best podcast that ever lived, “The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty!” So perhaps you noticed that I disappeared from the interwebs all of last week, that’s because I was working outside the reach of modern technology (and air conditioning). I had a fun week camping and surveying in the Zuni Mountains of New Mexico, which sounded like a pretty good topic for this week’s episode. We discuss the history of pioneering logging efforts in this area, as…
  • SAA Time 2014!

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    7 May 2014 | 6:32 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Tweet Hello friends! It's time for episode 15 of The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty "SAA Time 2014!" That's right, this is my reaction podcast to the Society for American Archaeology Conference in Austin, Texas. Pretty exciting stuff right?! Well, it's informative and entertaining at least (I hope!). This is a shorter episode because I have stuck only to topics falling under the banner of conferences, career advice, my fabu 4 days in Austin, and summer plans. I would definitely listen if you are a young archaeologist interested in figuring out the…
 
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    Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica

  • Audio News for October 12 to 18, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Archaeologists discover a link between rock art and living plants in the Chihuahuan Desert of New Mexico (details) Largest known Greek pottery workshop discovered on Sicily (details) High-altitude finds in Wyoming change perspectives on Native American land use (details) Massive temple complex dedicated to Baal the Storm God discovered in Israel (details)
  • Audio News for October 5 to 11, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    13 Oct 2014 | 11:52 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Spanish site shows wealthy, well-organized Bronze Age society (details) New finds help decipher key ritual of the Inca (details) Ancient date for Indonesian cave art may rewrite human history (details) Greek burial confirmed as Philip II, father of Alexander the Great (details)
  • Audio News for September 28 to October 4, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    6 Oct 2014 | 5:53 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Newly discovered pre-Chacoan villages in northern Arizona provide clues to a gap in Southwestern prehistory (details) Archaeological climate study indicates a brief window of opportunity for Polynesian migration (details) A new archaeological perspective on Scandinavian masculinity (details) Canadian researchers confirm the discovery of the doomed HMS Erebus (details)
  • Audio News for September 21 to 27, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:51 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Underwater search seeks signs of ice-age sites in British Columbia (details) Paleolithic site in Armenia suggests human ability to innovate is universal trait (details) New trove of geoglyphs documented in Kazakhstan (details) Ordnance clearing work in Poland finds older weapons, too, from medieval knights (details)
  • Audio News for September 14 to 20, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    22 Sep 2014 | 5:04 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Agave-derived alcohol may have filled a Teotihuacan nutritional gap (details) A new NOAA-sponsored study of San Francisco Bay sheds light on a nautical graveyard (details) Minutely detailed gold inlay may be the result of Bronze Age child labor (details) A forensic study of King Richard III’s remains reveals a likely cause of death (details)
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    MorgansLists.com

  • Images of the Most Beautiful Cockroaches From Around the Internet

    Morgans Lists
    9 Oct 2014 | 10:17 am
    Trilobite CockroachYellow Porcelain RoachNeotropical CockroachBlue CockroachCanopy CockroachBlue-lined CockroachTrilobite CockroachDomino CockroachEllipsidion CockroachBush CockroachForest CockroachBlattodea CockroachBlattodea CockroachTropical CockroachBlattodea CockroachBlattoptera CockroachRainforest CockroachGreen Banana CockroachEucorydia aenea dasytoides CockroachWasp-Mimic CockroachPerisphaerus CockroachCloud Forest Cockroachbeautiful cockroaches, beautiful roaches, cockroaches, colorful cockroaches, Neotropical Cockroach, roaches, Trilobite Cockroach, Cloud Forest…
  • 60 Examples Of Real Medieval Clothing - An Evolution Of Fashion

    Morgans Lists
    24 Sep 2014 | 1:48 pm
    Linen tunic with embroidered "jewelry" from grave of Queen Bathildis. (d. 680; buried at Chelles Abbey)Leggings from the 8th century A.D.Photograph of Skjoldehamn decorated trouserlegs. (Skjold harbor, Norway, ca 1050-1090)Hose belonging to German Emperor Heinrich III., Speyr Dom, 1056.Caftan of a chieftain, covered with Syrian silk featuring senmurvs Early 9th century Moshchevaya Balka burial ground, North-Western Caucasus, Stavropol Region Silk (samite), squirrel fur.Tunic belonging to Heinrich II, first half of the 11th C. Abegg-Stiftung Foundation, Bern.A tunic of the infante Don García…
  • 5 Modern Reptiles That Give Birth To Live Young

    Morgans Lists
    17 Sep 2014 | 12:20 am
    A female Adder giving birth to live young.Ovoviviparous is the term used for reptiles that give birth to live young, which only represents about 20 percent of the modern scaled reptile population. Ovoviviparous species are similar to viviparous species, in that there is internal fertilization and the young are born live, but differ because the young are nourished by egg yolk, as there is no placental connection. Most reptiles give birth to live young, but there are some reptiles that do have placenta like structures capable of transferring nutrients and are therefore considered…
  • When Predators Become Prey - 4 Animals That Twist The Food Chain

    Morgans Lists
    10 Sep 2014 | 1:40 pm
    #1 Frog Devours SnakeNear Queensland, Australia Ian Hamiliton of Australia's Daily Mercury captured these photos of what several articles identify as a Cane Toad, but what may actually be a type of Tree Frog (Litoria), devouring a Brown Tree Snake or a Keelback snake, in a bizarre twist of the normal food chain. The non-venomous Brown Tree Snake usually feeds on birds and even amphibians, so it was a surprise and a treat for many interested parties. A veterinary surgeon interviewed in one newspaper commented, "We have seen snakes eating frogs here but not the other way around. We have…
  • 6 Organisms That Can Survive The Fallout From A Nuclear Explosion

    Morgans Lists
    29 Aug 2014 | 2:13 pm
    An animal's ability to survive the fallout from a nuclear explosion is usually dependent on its ability to withstand radiation, otherwise know as radioresistance. Radioresistant life forms or ionizing-radiation-resistant organisms (IRRO) are a group of organisms that require large doses of radiation, 1000 gray (Gy), to achieve a 90% reduction in their survival rate. To put it in perspective, a human would need anywhere between 4-10 (Gy) to achieve the same result and a dog could withstand even less, about 3.5 (Gy). Gray, with the symbol of (Gy), is a unit of measurement used to describe the…
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    NOSAS Archaeology Blog

  • Old routes through Ross-shire: Luib, near Achnasheen, to Scardroy in Strathconon

    nosas
    14 Oct 2014 | 3:24 pm
    by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS) A six mile stretch of rough moorland, west of Achnasheen, is traversed by what was once a well made road generally 3 metres in width. Although it has fallen into disuse and is travelled only by the occasional walker, possibly doing a coast to coast trip, the road today is very distinct and forms a pleasant days’ ramble, especially when combined with an outward journey to Achnasheen on the Kyle of Lochalsh train (with homeward transport parked at Scardroy). But what are the origins of the road? and why did it fall out of use? A route through Strathconon to Loch…
  • Pictish Burial Practices and Remains

    nosas
    12 Oct 2014 | 8:34 am
    by Roland Spencer-Jones (NOSAS) These notes are in preparation for NOSAS field trips to two recognised Pictish cemeteries in the Highland region – Garbeg near Drumnadrochit on Saturday 1st November 2014. See Highland Council HER, RCAHMS Canmore Whitebridge near Foyers on Sunday March 8th 2015. See HER, RCAHMS Canmore The Picts, those most elusive of early medieval Scottish peoples, seem to have disposed of their dead in a variety of ways. Remains that can still be found in the landscape include cremations, simple burials in the ground, long cist burials, burials under cairns, and burials…
  • Excavations at Rhynie 2014

    nosas
    4 Oct 2014 | 1:04 pm
    by Cathy MacIver (Rhynie Community Archaeologist, CMS Archaeology) Earlier in September the Village Square in Rhynie, Aberdeenshire was a bustling hive of activity. Archaeologists, artists and locals got together for a week-long celebration of heritage and hospitality during the Art and Artefact Project (funded by HLF). This project was a collaboration between Dr Gordon Noble (University of Aberdeen) and Rhynie Woman, a local artists collective. The project capitalised on the research and fieldwork undertaken in and around Rhynie since 2005 by Gordon (Aberdeen) and Meggen (Chester) as part…
  • Belladrum Excavation, 31st August – 7th September 2014

    nosas
    15 Sep 2014 | 2:16 pm
    by Roland Spencer-Jones (NOSAS) The Belladrum drama has a Prologue and two Acts, three main protagonists, and a horde (sic) of extras. The Prologue: Enter first Joe Gibbs, landowner at Belladrum and host to the annual August Tartan Heart Festival. During clearing his fields after the Festival, he employs a metal detectorist to identify and get rid of all the left-behind tent pegs. Enter next that said detectorist, Eric Soane, who in August 2009 scanned the site and discovered a scatter of Roman denarii and some mediaeval coins. Enter third, Fraser Hunter, a principal Curator at the National…
  • Highland Hillforts

    nosas
    15 Sep 2014 | 1:54 pm
    by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS) The Atlas of Hillforts in Britain and Ireland project Hillforts are one of the most prominent types of prehistoric monument seen across many parts of Britain and Ireland, and this hillfort project has recently been set up with the aim of producing a paper atlas and an online searchable atlas linked to Google Earth. It is a collaborative four year project between the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh, and contributions from members of the public, either as individuals or as part of local field groups, are welcome. Several members of NOSAS were interested in…
 
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