Archaeology

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  • Ancient Paquime and the Casas Grande World - Book Review

    ArchaeologyOnline: Archaeological Information on the Web
    Anita
    18 Aug 2015 | 9:12 am
    K. Kris Hirst has done an excellent job reviewing Ancient Paquime and the Casas Grande World, so I will just add that Paquime is in northern Chihuahua, Mexico, and can be visited today. The book covers the 40 years of research that has been done since Charles di Peso's ground-breaking work was published. Minnis Paul E., and Whalen Michael E., editors. 2015. Ancient Paquime and the Casas
  • Divers Find Missing Military Tanker in Hawaii

    Archaeological Headlines - Archaeology Magazine
    1 Sep 2015 | 2:30 pm
    JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM, HAWAII—A U.S. Naval tanker that served in both World War II and the Korean War has been found in the protected waters of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument. “This is a ship that wasn’t a glamourous part of World War II history, but was an important part,” Kelly Keogh, Maritime Heritage Coordinator for the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, told Hawaii News Now. The USNS Mission San Miguel transported fuel for military vessels, and was traveling from Guam to Seattle in 1957 when it hit a reef in the Northwestern…
  • Oldest case of leukemia discovered: Prehistoric female skeleton shows signs of this cancer

    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily
    31 Aug 2015 | 5:56 am
    Scientists have discovered what may well be the oldest known case of leukemia. By means of high-resolution computer tomography, they were able to detect indications of the cancer in an approximately 7000 year old skeleton of a woman who died between 30 and 40 years of age. Any other, similar pathologies could be ruled out.
  • Finders of Blackbeard's ship file $8.2M lawsuit against NC

    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek
    Rick Allen
    30 Aug 2015 | 4:30 am
    Battle Over Shipwreck Photos Brews in N.C. By DAN MCCUE  Tweet            (CN) - Practically daring a shipwreck-hunter to claim his booty has been plundered, the North Carolina Legislature on Wednesday declared photographs and video footage of shipwrecks held by North Carolina state agencies are public records, freely available to all.      Passage of the bill comes in the wake of an $8 million lawsuit filed against the state by the company that found the legendary pirate Blackbeard's sunken ship off the North Carolina coast in November 1996.      In a complaint in Wake…
  • CNN feature on the Ho Citadel

    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog
    noelbynature
    1 Sep 2015 | 5:51 am
    Inscribed into the World Heritage List in 2011, the Ho Citadel in Vietnam is one of the less-known sites, even in the region. Ho Citadel. Source: CNN 20150826 Most unlikely UNESCO site: The empty citadel of Vietnam CNN.com, 26 August 2015 You might expect a communist government to distance itself from its imperial past, but the Vietnamese regime has seen the value in celebrating the country’s bygone emperors and promoting its ancient citadels as tourist destinations. Since 1993, eight Vietnamese locations — including three citadels — have been designated as World Heritage…
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    ArchaeologyOnline: Archaeological Information on the Web

  • Ancient Paquime and the Casas Grande World - Book Review

    Anita
    18 Aug 2015 | 9:12 am
    K. Kris Hirst has done an excellent job reviewing Ancient Paquime and the Casas Grande World, so I will just add that Paquime is in northern Chihuahua, Mexico, and can be visited today. The book covers the 40 years of research that has been done since Charles di Peso's ground-breaking work was published. Minnis Paul E., and Whalen Michael E., editors. 2015. Ancient Paquime and the Casas
  • Great Dismal Swamp Archaeological Field School, May 13- June 17th

    Anita
    6 Apr 2015 | 6:14 pm
    American University and the Department of Anthropology are pleased to invite students to participate in the 6th Great Dismal Swamp Archaeology Field School to start during the early summer of 2015. The Field School will take place in the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) located in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina (near Norfolk, Suffolk, and Virginia
  • The International Brigades Archaeology Project - September 1-15, 2015

    Anita
    18 Feb 2015 | 6:50 am
    English: Memorial plate for international brigade from London to the Spanish civil war. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) The International Brigades Archaeology Project (IBAP) is studying the sites of the Spanish Civil War in Spain. In 1937, the 15th International Brigade, including the Abraham Lincoln, British, and MacKenzie-Papineau Battalions, was heavily involved in a fierce battle for the small
  • Valcamonica Rock Art and Archaeology Fieldwork & Fieldschool

    Anita
    17 Feb 2015 | 2:29 pm
    From July 16 to August 6 2015 the annual archaeology field school at Paspardo will be open to archaeologists, scholars, students and enthusiasts. This area gives a great opportunity to learn, survey, photograph, draw and catalogue the rock engravings. The program involves field research, documentation, tracing, guided visits and lectures. Fieldwork is organised by Footsteps of Man, Valcamonica.
  • Mount Vernon 2014 Collaborative Historic Preservation Field School May 27- July 3

    Anita
    22 Feb 2014 | 8:23 am
    George Washington’s Mount Vernon, located near Washington, DC, is the historic site dedicated to interpreting the life of the first president within the context of his home and plantation.  The 2014 Mount Vernon/University of Maryland (UMD) Field School in Historic Preservation is in the second year of a multi-year project to explore the archaeological, architectural, and interpretive
 
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    Archaeological Headlines - Archaeology Magazine

  • Divers Find Missing Military Tanker in Hawaii

    1 Sep 2015 | 2:30 pm
    JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM, HAWAII—A U.S. Naval tanker that served in both World War II and the Korean War has been found in the protected waters of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument. “This is a ship that wasn’t a glamourous part of World War II history, but was an important part,” Kelly Keogh, Maritime Heritage Coordinator for the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, told Hawaii News Now. The USNS Mission San Miguel transported fuel for military vessels, and was traveling from Guam to Seattle in 1957 when it hit a reef in the Northwestern…
  • More on Artifacts From Jamestown Graves

    1 Sep 2015 | 2:00 pm
    ITHACA, NEW YORK—Two artifacts recovered from the graves of high-status people buried in the chancel of Virginia’s James Fort church were scanned by Mark Riccio, director of the Cornell Biotechnology Resource Center’s computed tomography scanning facilities. Jamestown Rediscovery senior conservator Michael Lavin and senior staff archaeologist David Givens took a small, sealed silver box and a block of earth containing silver threads to Riccio, who developed protocols to scan the objects. Together, the scientists were able to establish that the block of earth contained silver…
  • Scientists See Four Main Stages of Human Evolution

    1 Sep 2015 | 1:30 pm
    BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK—The human body has gone through four main stages of evolution, according to an international team of scientists who studied fossils from the Sima de los Huesos in Spain’s Sierra de Atapuerca. The site of Sima de los Huesos, or “Pit of Bones,” dates back some 430,000 years and contains more human fossils than have been found anywhere else in the world. The researchers then compared the Atapuerca individuals to the rest of the human fossil record and found that they fit into the third stage of evolution, and shared many anatomical features with later…
  • 2,500-Year-Old Reused Tomb Discovered in Luxor

    1 Sep 2015 | 1:00 pm
    LUXOR, EGYPT—The 26th Dynasty tomb of Padibastet, the vizier of Upper Egypt, has been discovered within the tomb of Karabasken, who was ruler of Thebes and the fourth priest of Amun during the 25th Dynasty. The tomb contained paintings and architectural features that had been made especially for Padibastet. The members of the South Assassif Conservation Project expect to learn more as the survey continues and the tomb is excavated and cleaned. “Padibastet could be buried in a shaft inside the court or in a main burial chamber of Karabasken tomb,” Elena Pischikova, head of…
  • Roman Mosaic Conserved

    31 Aug 2015 | 2:30 pm
    STARA ZAGORA, BULGARIA—Conservators have completed work on a fourth-century A.D. mosaic that was discovered in the ruins of the ancient Roman city of Augusta Traiana in 2011, reports Archaeology in Bulgaria. The mosaic was discovered during rescue excavations, and once decorated a triclinium, or formal dining room. It depicts followers of the god Dionysus during a celebratory procession. On the right is Silenus, the tutor and companion of the god, who leads two dancing women. Local archaeologists describe the work as skillfully done, pointing to the subtle use of color and…
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    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Oldest case of leukemia discovered: Prehistoric female skeleton shows signs of this cancer

    31 Aug 2015 | 5:56 am
    Scientists have discovered what may well be the oldest known case of leukemia. By means of high-resolution computer tomography, they were able to detect indications of the cancer in an approximately 7000 year old skeleton of a woman who died between 30 and 40 years of age. Any other, similar pathologies could be ruled out.
  • Philistines introduced sycamore, cumin and opium poppy into Israel during the Iron Age

    28 Aug 2015 | 8:27 am
    A new study describes the bio-archaeological remains of the Philistine culture in Israel during the Iron Age (12th century to 7th century BCE). The results of this research indicate that the ca. 600 year presence of the Philistine culture had a major and long-term impact on local floral biodiversity.
  • Unusual use of blue pigment found in ancient mummy portraits

    26 Aug 2015 | 11:41 am
    In an unexpected discovery, a research team of scientists and art conservators has found an unusual use of the pigment Egyptian blue in Roman-era Egyptian mummy portraits. No blue is visible to the naked eye in the paintings, but when the researchers used analytical tools for an in-depth study, they discovered the ancient artists used the pigment as material for underdrawings and for modulating color -- a finding never before documented.
  • Where bread began: Ancient tools used to reconstruct -- and taste -- prehistoric cuisine

    26 Aug 2015 | 7:16 am
    A group of intrepid Israeli researchers recently went back to the dawn of the Stone Age to make lunch. Using 12,500-year-old conical mortars carved into bedrock, they reconstructed how their ancient ancestors processed wild barley to produce groat meals, as well as a delicacy that might be termed 'proto-pita' -- small loaves of coal-baked, unleavened bread. In so doing, they re-enacted a critical moment in the rise of civilization.
  • Key genetic event underlying fin-to-limb evolution

    18 Aug 2015 | 7:29 am
    A study of catsharks reveals how alterations in the expression and function of certain genes in limb buds underlie the evolution of fish fins to limbs. The findings give new insight into how fish evolved to live on land in the form of early tetrapods.
 
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    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek

  • Finders of Blackbeard's ship file $8.2M lawsuit against NC

    Rick Allen
    30 Aug 2015 | 4:30 am
    Battle Over Shipwreck Photos Brews in N.C. By DAN MCCUE  Tweet            (CN) - Practically daring a shipwreck-hunter to claim his booty has been plundered, the North Carolina Legislature on Wednesday declared photographs and video footage of shipwrecks held by North Carolina state agencies are public records, freely available to all.      Passage of the bill comes in the wake of an $8 million lawsuit filed against the state by the company that found the legendary pirate Blackbeard's sunken ship off the North Carolina coast in November 1996.      In a complaint in Wake…
  • Blackbeard's Shipwreck Recovery!

    Rick Allen
    29 Aug 2015 | 9:00 am
    In June of 1718 Blackbeard the Pirate ran his flagship, the Queen Anne's Revenge, aground near Beaufort Inlet, NC in what may be the first case of corporate downsizing in the new world. The Queen Anne's Revenge grounded on a sandbar, cracking her main-mast and severely damaging many of her timbers. Blackbeard ordered his sloops to throw ropes across the flagship in an attempt to free her but the sloop Adventure also ran aground and both vessels appeared to be damaged beyond repair. Blackbeard's Queen Anne's Revenge Shipwreck Project Video
  • North Carolina Law Claims Shipwreck Images, Video & Documentary Materials in its Custody are NC Property

    Rick Allen
    29 Aug 2015 | 8:58 am
    On August 18, 2015 NC Governor Pat McCrory signed HB 184 (Section 121-25 (b)), into law. The law, originally proposed by the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, makes; "All photographs, video recordings, or other documentary materials of a derelict vessel or shipwreck or its contents, relics, artifacts, or historic materials in the custody of any agency of North Carolina government or its subdivisions shall be a public record pursuant to G.S. 132-1. There shall be no limitation on the use of or no requirement to alter any such photograph, video recordings, or other documentary…
  • Second Call for Entries: TAC Festival 2016

    Rick Pettigrew
    7 Aug 2015 | 10:33 am
    To our film producer and distributor friends: We invite you now to submit entries for the 2016 edition of The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival. This is the only international competition for this genre in the entire Western Hemisphere and a wonderful showcase for your work. Our deadline for receipt of entries is October 15, 2015. Film screenings for TAC Festival 2016 take place May 11-15, 2016, in the Recital Hall at The Shedd Institute here in Eugene, Oregon, USA. You can find our entry form and further information by going to…
  • Strata: Portraits of Humanity features Fijian warfare and cannibalism

    Rick Pettigrew
    15 Jul 2015 | 11:44 am
    Friends and colleagues: You can see two unique features in the July 2015 edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV: * The region surrounding Turkey’s Sea of Marmara, including the storied capitol city, Istanbul, is renowned for its visible reminders of antiquity. This is an archaeological and historical wonderland that draws visitors from all over the world. * Across the islands of Fiji, hilltop fortresses tell a tale of a warfare and cannibalism going back a thousand years, when the war gods demanded tribute or revenge. Yet people have been on these islands far…
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    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog

  • CNN feature on the Ho Citadel

    noelbynature
    1 Sep 2015 | 5:51 am
    Inscribed into the World Heritage List in 2011, the Ho Citadel in Vietnam is one of the less-known sites, even in the region. Ho Citadel. Source: CNN 20150826 Most unlikely UNESCO site: The empty citadel of Vietnam CNN.com, 26 August 2015 You might expect a communist government to distance itself from its imperial past, but the Vietnamese regime has seen the value in celebrating the country’s bygone emperors and promoting its ancient citadels as tourist destinations. Since 1993, eight Vietnamese locations — including three citadels — have been designated as World Heritage…
  • Myanmar selectively acts against properties encroaching into Bagan sites

    noelbynature
    1 Sep 2015 | 5:30 am
    Myanmar has begun to pursue legal action against properties that have encroached onto the Bagan heritage areas, but have notably left out a number of prominent hotels. The action is ostensibly so that the complex can be listed for Unesco World Heritage status, but the question to whether this measure is effective remains to be seen. View from the Aureum Palace Hotel. Source: Myanmar Times 20150825 Many big-name Bagan hotels left off encroachment list Myanmar Times, 25 August 2015 The government has named 11 buildings in Bagan that are facing charges for flouting cultural laws but the list…
  • Singapore archaeology team donates to Phnom Kulen reforestation

    noelbynature
    23 Aug 2015 | 6:22 pm
    Singapore archaeologists working in Cambodia donate money towards the reforestation of Phnom Kulen, which in recent years has been stricken by illegal logging and slash-and-burn agriculture. Singapore archaeologists help with reforestation of potential Cambodian Unesco site The Straits Times, 20 August 2015 An archaeology team from Singapore is helping in the reforestation efforts of a potential Unesco World Heritage Site in Cambodia. The Phnom Kulen, or the Mountain of Lychees in Cambodia, which is on Unesco’s tentative list, has been cleared for agriculture and illegally logged for…
  • Jayavarman VII’s hospitals and the Angkorian healthcare system

    noelbynature
    23 Aug 2015 | 5:54 pm
    Cambodia Daily’s interview with Dr Rethy Chhem about his work in radiology and archaeological investigations in Jayavarman VII’s hospitals. Full story Bas-relief of Angkorian medical care. Source: Cambodia Daily 20150822. Uncovering the Healthcare System of Angkor Cambodia Daily, 22 August 2015 By the time Jayavarman VII came to the throne, the kingdom already had a long medical tradition, according to Dr. Chhem. In the 7th century, there had been a small dynasty of doctors at the Khmer court: one family of doctors spanning four generations, he said. Also during that century,…
  • Excavations at Ho Citadel reveal moat structure

    noelbynature
    21 Aug 2015 | 6:14 am
    Excavations at the Ho Citadel Unesco World Heritage Site have uncovered the remnant of a moat system among other archaeological finds. Excavation at Ho Citadel. Source: Viet Nam News 20150819 Relics discovered at Ho Dynasty Citadel Viet Nam News, 19 August 2015 Several relics and artifacts have been excavated from the Ho Dynasty Citadel’s southern area in the central province of Thanh Hoa, Director of Heritage Conservation Centre Do Quang Trong said. Most recently, the three-month-long excavation of a 2,040sq.m area discovered a moat system and the relic of a citadel’s coastline.
 
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    Publishing Archaeology

  • Why was my paper rejected ?

    Michael E. Smith
    24 Aug 2015 | 7:48 pm
    Just got a tip from Retraction Watch for this paper:Phillips, David    2015    Who gets published? Comparative Education 51(3): 303-304.Phillips present a list of common reasons for the rejection of manuscripts from journals in the field of education research:·         wrong journal;·         too long/short;·         journalism;·         extract from report/dissertation…
  • What is wrong with abstract social theory?

    Michael E. Smith
    13 Aug 2015 | 8:27 am
    A lot of archaeologists like to use high-level, abstract social theory. I think that such theory is not only a waste of time, but harmful to archaeology. It is harmful because such theory does not explain variation and change in past human societies, and it diverts attention away from the kind of middle-range theory needed to explain past social developments in a causal framework. I am NOT talking about Binford's concept of middle-range theory; I refer instead to the standard social-science meaning as described by Robert Merton). See Smith (2011) for discussion.Here is a passage from Smith…
  • An article that isn't very memorable

    Michael E. Smith
    29 Jul 2015 | 9:56 pm
     *** SECTION ADDED, AUGUST 1, 2015:I think I fired off the following post to hastily. I took the time to actually read/skim the paper in question, and its really not too bad! In fact, I think it does a good job in synthesizing quite a bit of material on state formation in Postclassic Mesoamerica. So I have posted the paper in case anyone is interested.I'll leave the post unchanged below. I think it points out an issue about scholarship and publishing that doesn't get discussed too much: the emotional side. I am emotionally invested in my research and publishing. I am a scholar. This is…
  • Academia.edu takes a step backward

    Michael E. Smith
    13 Jul 2015 | 8:59 am
    I have been using Academia.edu increasingly. I now post all of my current papers there, and sometimes for displacement activity I'll take a few minutes to post some older papers. There are more and more people on the service, and it has turned into a very useful resource. A few years ago I posted,   'How useful is Academia.edu?" My evaluation then was generally positive, with a few negative features. Since then, they have fixed a couple of the negative features, and others don't seem quite so serious now.It would be useful if all academics should set up a page on Academia.edu. I always…
  • World's worst book review?

    Michael E. Smith
    6 May 2015 | 6:38 pm
    A scholarly book review should do three things: (1) Describe the contents of the book. What is the book about, and what does it cover?  (2) Describe the scholarly context of the book. Where does the book fit within the literature, how does it relate to other works in terms of data, theory, or methods, etc. and, (3) Evaluate the book critically. I've written a lot about book reviews in this blog; for an overview, see my earliest such post.I have just read what may be the worst book review I have ever seen. I'll keep this anonymous to protect the guilty. Scholar A is reviewing an edited…
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    Middle Savagery

  • Palmyra: A Lamentation

    colleenmorgan
    1 Sep 2015 | 9:13 am
    I could write about the strange aesthetics of annihilation, iconoclasm, nationalism, symbolism, weaponized cultural heritage and the murder of people, a place, an archaeologist. I am supposed to be an expert in this, after all. Intimate of the ancient. Or, on a more personal level–how Palmyra blushed toward the blue desert sky. How I was ragged sick so I didn’t take very many photos, but dragged around the site anyway, sitting in the shade of columns. Picking out details. Petting the friendly cats in the ruins. Now every time I hear about something else being destroyed I go…
  • Analogue/Digital Archaeology Session at the EAA

    colleenmorgan
    28 Aug 2015 | 2:38 am
    Join us at the European Association of Archaeologists meetings in Glasgow on Saturday, September 5th from 8:00 – 10:00 in Room 361 for our discussion panel: Analogue/Digital: Productive Tensions in Materiality and Archaeology Abstract: As we integrate digital workflows into every aspect of archaeological methodology, it is increasingly apparent that we are all digital archaeologists (Morgan and Eve 2012). Yet archaeology has a long, productive and unfinished history with “analogue” media. Illustration, photography, dioramas, casts, paper-based maps, diagrams, charts and artistic…
  • My Day of Archaeology: Meeting the US Ambassador

    colleenmorgan
    28 Jul 2015 | 5:50 am
    For the Day of Archaeology this year, I wrote up my experiences at the US Ambassador’s House talking about Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics), including my archaeology photo in the “distractingly sexy” campaign: For more, read the entry at the Day of Archaeology webpage.    
  • Post-photography and Archaeology

    colleenmorgan
    21 Jul 2015 | 6:41 am
    Eron Rauch’ post-photography in video games: “This panorama is made up of screenshots of every player corpse I came across while I levelled up my character in World of Warcraft.” Last week I submitted my CAA paper, The Death (and Afterlife) of Archaeological Photography, for publication in the proceedings. It’s the second paper on photography and archaeology that I’ve submitted this month; the first was Archaeological Photography as Dangerous Supplement and covered the analog to digital transition, with some added content/semiotic analysis thrown in for good…
  • Pop-Up Archaeology Museums!

    colleenmorgan
    15 Jul 2015 | 5:41 am
    Florence Laino, one of our recent University of York Digital Heritage MSc graduates, has joined forced with L-P Archaeology in creating a Pop-Up Museum for the 100 Minories site near the tower of London. You may remember that Dan & I were involved in early testing at the site. L-P Archaeology had a previous pop-up museum, HIPUM on Hayling Island. We had a chance to check out the Pop-Up Museum a couple of weeks ago, and they’ve done an impressive job with temporary displays with finds from the site. The site was in the London city ditch, so all manner of artifacts came out of it.
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    Looting Matters

  • Temple of Bel at Palmyra destroyed: confirmation

    David Gill
    31 Aug 2015 | 3:34 pm
    Satellite imagery supplied by the UN has confirmed the destruction of the Temple of Bel at Palmyra (released via the BBC). There had been suggestions that the destruction had been partial.
  • "Credible provenance" and the Minoan larnax

    David Gill
    31 Aug 2015 | 3:22 pm
    Back in September 2008 the Michael C. Carlos Museum spoke about the importance of a "credible provenance" or "history of ownership" in a press statement responding to Greek claims for three items in the museum.As far as I can see the museum has never presented the authenticated collecting history (sometimes obsoletely termed the "provenance") for the Minoan larnax in its collection.I have read the documentation on this piece and the photographic evidence from the Becchina archive is compelling.I am also aware that the positive identification was made by Dr Christos Tsirogiannis.We know that…
  • Palmyra: Temple of Bel destroyed

    David Gill
    31 Aug 2015 | 12:57 am
    The BBC is now reporting that the Temple of Bel at Palmyra has been partially destroyed ("Syria's Palmyra Temple of Bel 'severely damaged' by IS", BBC News August 31, 2015). This is the latest in a sequence of deliberate destruction of this UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • The Minoan Larnax in the Michael C. Carlos Museum

    David Gill
    29 Aug 2015 | 3:08 pm
    I am much enjoying Adam Nicolson's The Mighty Dead: Why Homer Matters (London: William Collins, 2014). I love the weaving of the literary landscapes and the application of Homer's works to contemporary society. And I am about to move from "Grasping Homer" to "Loving Homer".The book has a series of "Homeric" (broadly speaking!) colour images: a gold mask from the shaft graves at Mycenae; inlaid Myceanean daggers; representations of the Homeric narratives on Athenian black- and red-figured pottery; a writing tablet from the Ulu Burun shipwreck; the walls of Tiryns; the "Homeric" cup from…
  • The Becchina case continues

    David Gill
    29 Aug 2015 | 2:19 pm
    Ursula Kampmann has written about the continuing case of Gianfranco Becchina ("The Becchina case – or: a footnote to practical aspects of the return of cultural property", Coins Weekly August 27, 2015 [note that the article has been translated]). She notes that some 1278 objects were left without certain "provenance" --- what is clearly meant (and this is why I do wish that those writing about the market would differentiate between "collecting history" and "findspot") is that it was not possible to ascertain where those 1278 objects had been found. (And just to clarify, I suspect that the…
 
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    The Archaeology News Network

  • New archaeological finds in the centre of Athens

    31 Aug 2015 | 7:30 am
    The Greek Culture Ministry announced two significant finds on Friday at the archaeological sites of Kerameikos Cemetery and Roman Agora, at the centre of Athens. A view of the well mouth discovered at Kerameikos ancient Cemetery, Athens [Credit: Greek Ministry of Culture]At the archaeological site of Kerameikos archaeologists from the German Archaeological Institute brought to light a well probably used for hydromancy rituals. The... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Looted church treasures return to Cyprus

    30 Aug 2015 | 7:00 am
    The Church of Cyprus has announced that 34 treasures which have been stolen from the island’s Turkish occupied areas, are expected to return on Friday afternoon to Cyprus, following a decision by the Munich Court of Appeals, on 16 March, in the case of Turkish art smuggler Aydin Dikmen. Some of the items the church had hoped would be  returned to Cyprus [Credit: Balkaneu]Among them, 24 are Byzantine relics and some prehistoric... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Pharaonic mummy gets facial reconstruction surgery

    29 Aug 2015 | 8:00 am
    Forensic techniques by international scientists has led to the facial reconstruction of the oldest preserved mummy in the Egyptian Museum of Florence. Forensic techniques by international scientists has led to the facial reconstruction  of the oldest preserved mummy in the Egyptian Museum of Florence  [Credit: Dr Matteo Borrini/Liverpool John Moores University]The research, led by Dr Matteo Borrini, forensic anthropologist... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Philistines brought opium, cumin and sycamore to Israel

    29 Aug 2015 | 7:00 am
    One of the most pressing issues in modern biological conservation is "invasion biology." Due to unprecedented contacts between peoples and culture in today's "global village" certain animal and plant species are spreading widely throughout the world, often causing enormous damage to local species. A new study describes the bio-archaeological remains of the Philistine culture in Israel  during the Iron Age (12th century to 7th... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Olba excavations in southern Turkey close season

    28 Aug 2015 | 12:00 pm
    Archaeological excavations have been carried out since 2010 in the ancient city of Olba, located in the southern Turkish province of Mersin’s Silifke district by a team from the Gazi University Archaeology Department, headed by Professor Emel Erten. Excavations at Olba this year revealed a mosaic floor from the 2nd century AD   [Credit: Cihan]The 500-person Olba Theater, which dates back to the Roman Empire and was... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    The Mathisen Corollary

  • Painted Rock, The Inner Connection to the Infinite, and Two Competing Visions of Human Existence

    David Warner Mathisen
    26 Aug 2015 | 3:26 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).The visionary Lakota holy man Black Elk once articulated a distinction between two competing visions: the first, a vision of harmony and connection between people and animals and also with the invisible world, and the second a vision of division and scarcity and an all-consuming, gnawing greed that ultimately dirties and destroys everything good before finally destroying itself.In his own account, which he allowed to be published in the book Black Elk Speaks, Black Elk associates these two visions with two paths he saw bisecting the great sacred hoop of life…
  • Crazy for the Storm, and the inner connection to the Infinite

    David Warner Mathisen
    16 Aug 2015 | 11:19 pm
    image (top): Wikimedia commons (link), with marker "flags" added to correspond to map below.image (bottom): Google maps, mountains north of Rancho Cucamonga, California (link), with marker flags and line-of-sight outlines added (light blue), plus route in dotted red line.In his critically-acclaimed memoir Crazy for the Storm (2009), Norman Ollestad shares a wide window onto his relationship with his amazing father, cut short by a terrible plane crash in the San Gabriel Mountains in 1979, into his emotions and experiences during his harrowing journey down the mountain alone at the age of…
  • Why do we greet the manifestation of the divine with palms together?

    David Warner Mathisen
    10 Aug 2015 | 7:58 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).Whenever a manifestation of divinity appears in the Mahabharata, the ancient Sanskrit epic that at over 200,000 lines is about 7.2 times longer than both the Iliad and the Odyssey combined and which contains the entirety of the Bhagavad Gita which itself is one of the clearest and most direct expositions of the ancient wisdom to have survived anywhere, the characters typically greet the divinity with palms pressed together.The text itself in most cases will specifically describe this palms-together greeting.For example, in the portion of the Bhagavad Gita in…
  • The Bhagavad Gita and the Bomb: sacred text, so often quoted on this anniversary, condemns murder by nuclear weapons

    David Warner Mathisen
    9 Aug 2015 | 3:44 am
    Above video (link): source here.The use of nuclear weapons against civilians in the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki seventy years ago has immediate and ongoing importance to every single human being to this day.If there is any justification for the use of force, for the development of martial prowess, the justification lies in the possibility that martial skill can be used to prevent the murder of innocents.The development and use of weapons for the express purpose of murdering noncombatants is a hideous perversion of that. The principle of non-murder should be the most uncontroversial…
  • "Split a piece of wood; I am there" -- the Force is all around us

    David Warner Mathisen
    3 Aug 2015 | 12:52 am
    Gospel of Thomas translation: Stephen Patterson and Marvin Meyer (link).David-Dorian Ross has devoted much of his life to the practice of Tai Chi Chuan and Chi Gung (or Qigong). He has won eight gold medals in US competition and a World Silver and two World Bronze medals in worldwide Tai Chi competition performances. Together with martial arts film superstar Jet Li, he has made it his mission to try to spread the message of the beneficial aspects of Tai Chi and Chi Gung to at least a hundred million people who have not previously known about them!Here is how he has described the force which…
 
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    Doug's Archaeology

  • Of national importance: recognising significance for planning

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    31 Aug 2015 | 3:00 am
    Videos from the CIfA conference in Cardiff: Organiser(s): Deborah Williams, Paul Jeffery and Carrie Cowan, Historic England The National Importance Programme has been set up by Historic England with ALGAO and DCMS to explore, via a series of pilot projects, how we might help Local Authority historic environment services to create a shared mechanism to identify non-scheduled but nationally important archaeological sites. In the face of on-going and future economic cuts, our session explores how Historic England might help Local Authority archaeologists in the identification of nationally…
  • The Future Of Archaeology Has Been Shelved

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    27 Aug 2015 | 3:00 am
    A video recorded session from the CIfA conference: The Future Of Archaeology Has Been Shelved Organiser(s): Gail Boyle, Society for Museum Archaeology, Duncan Brown, CIfA Archaeological Archives Group, Sam Paul, CIfA Archaeological Archives Group and Roy Stephenson, Society of Museum Archaeology For some, the future of archaeology lies in the huge resource, those records and assemblages, that archaeologists generate. While the same questions continue to be asked of archaeological project archives: what format should they take? what do they need to contain? who are they for and who uses them?;…
  • Our past, its future: the built environment in a changing world

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    26 Aug 2015 | 3:00 am
    Another video recorded session from the CIfA conference: Our past, its future: the built environment in a changing world Organiser(s): Ed James, Beacon Planning Ltd and Cath Poucher, Historic England English Heritage’s NHPP 2011-2015 and Key Messages Report (2013) identify a suite of environmental and related threats to our built heritage. The obvious implications of climate change mean a balance is needed to be struck between the imperative to be sustainable, and the need to conserve heritage significance. Is this balance right? Are existing conservation principles, based on C19 thinking,…
  • I, for One, Welcome Our New Archaeology Publishing Overlords

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    25 Aug 2015 | 4:00 am
    In June the Archaeology publishing world was rocked by a very significant event, but no one actually noticed it. What am I talking about? Taylor-Francis Group, itself part of a larger company, has bought out Maney. You can read the press release here. What does this mean and why should you care? What does this mean? First let’s start with a shameless plug- I predicted this very thing happening months ago but I was wrong about the timeline- “This pressure for publishers to have more journals has led to a very interesting development in Archaeology publishing. When data was…
  • Modelling large-scale human dispersals: data, pattern and process

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    24 Aug 2015 | 3:00 am
    A session video recorded from the CAA international conference: Archaeology has largely moved forward from the simplistic ‘dots-on-the-map’ and ‘arrows-on-the-map’ approaches when it comes to studying large-scale human movements. Current models regarding spatio-temporal distribution and migration of humans often highlight the complex nature of such phenomena and the limitations that any particular data type impose on the reconstruction, be it environmental (paleoclimate, paleotopography, paleofauna and -flora), archaeological (site distribution, patterns in material culture) and other…
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    Cultural Heritage Lawyer Rick St. Hilaire

  • The Night Before the Theft at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

    13 Aug 2015 | 2:30 pm
    The ConcertWho went to the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum the night before the notorious theft of over a dozen artworks?Carmen Ortiz, United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts, and the FBI released a video last week seeking an answer to this question. “With the public’s help, we may be able to develop new information that could lead to the recovery of these invaluable works of art,” Ortiz announced.The Storm on the Sea of GalileeTwenty-five years ago, thieves in Boston stole Vermeer’s The Concert and Rembrandt’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee…
  • Nominate CHL to the Annual Blawg 100

    3 Aug 2015 | 6:00 am
    Support the Cultural Heritage Lawyer blog!Click here to nominate CHL to the Annual Blawg 100.August 16 is the deadline, so time is short.Thank you for your support!©2010-2014 Cultural Heritage Lawyer. Content is general information only, not legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is formed. Links are not endorsements of websites’ contents. Other opinions are their own. Information presented is not attorney advertising.
  • Steering Clear of ISIS Loot: Don't Buy, Apply Strict Due Diligence

    30 Jul 2015 | 3:00 pm
    Ancient artifact collectors share a passion for history, culture, and aesthetics. The best collectors embrace their role as stewards of heritage by dutifully caring for cultural material through conservation, storage, display, and study. But as fighting in Syria and Iraq intensifies, principled collectors are asking how to avoid purchasing "blood antiquities."Like archaeologists, heritage preservationists, and the concerned public, collectors have seen the disconcerting satellite images of looters' pits that confirm severe damage to the archaeological record, and…
  • House Adopts The Foreign Cultural Exchange Jurisdictional Immunity Clarification Act

    9 Jun 2015 | 7:14 pm
    The Foreign Cultural Exchange Jurisdictional Immunity Clarification Act passed the House of Representatives late this afternoon. H.R. 889, which received broad bipartisan support by legislators in Congress, now goes to the Senate.The committee report accompanying the legislation explained that "a provision in the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (FSIA) discourages foreign governments from lending government-owned artwork and objects of cultural significance to U.S. museums and educational institutions for temporary exhibition or display. Foreign governments…
  • House Passes Protect and Preserve International Cultural Property Act

    1 Jun 2015 | 10:14 pm
    On Monday afternoon, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 1493, the Protect and Preserve International Cultural Property Act.CHL has prepared a video snippet of the debate and vote, courtesy of C-Span. Watch below or click here if you are experiencing difficulty.©2010-2014 Cultural Heritage Lawyer. Content is general information only, not legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is formed. Links are not endorsements of websites’ contents. Other opinions are their own. Information presented is not attorney advertising.
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    AntiquityNOW

  • Khaled al-Asaad and the Price of Memory

    AntiquityNOW
    1 Sep 2015 | 5:00 am
    The murder by ISIS of Khaled al-Asaad, 82, a renowned Syrian archaeologist and scholar, was a heinous act. His death is a blow to Syria and the world’s cultural heritage. What possesses a person to cleave so to an ideal … Continue reading →
  • Summer Reading Recap: Mesopotamia and the Middle East

    AntiquityNOW
    27 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    It’s time to head back to school and if you’re a teacher that means decorating your classroom and finishing up your lesson plans. We’re here to help you out with free resources on ancient Mesopotamia and the Middle East. From … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! Recipes for Winter in the Southern Hemisphere

    AntiquityNOW
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    In the southern hemisphere, the cold days of winter are slowly giving way to warmer weather. Soon sweaters and scarves will be replaced by bathing suits and sunglasses, but for now, let’s indulge in a few cozy, warming culinary treats. … Continue reading →
  • Summer Reading Recap: Asia

    AntiquityNOW
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    We’ve reached the end of August and school is nearly back in session. Whether you’re a student, teacher or parent it’s not too late for a refresher on ancient Asian history. We’re bringing you a selection of blog posts and … Continue reading →
  • Summer Reading Recap: Greece

    AntiquityNOW
    20 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    For those of you returning to school this September, today we’re bringing you up to speed on ancient Greece. Make sure you’re the first one to raise your hand this year when the teacher says, “Where is the birthplace of … Continue reading →
 
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    Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica

  • Audio News for August 23 through 29, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    31 Aug 2015 | 10:16 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Major display of sacrificed victims finally found at main Aztec temple complex (details) Mycenaean palace found with new Linear B inscriptions (details) New studies support manuscript suggesting Jesus had a wife, and women were disciples (details) Middle eastern militants destroy ancient temple at Palmyra (details)
  • Audio News for August 16 through 22, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    24 Aug 2015 | 10:06 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: A 7000-year old mass grave suggests a wider pattern of regional violence and conflict during the Early Neolithic period (details) A geophysical survey leads to the discovery of a Roman-period glass foundry on the Nile Delta (details) High-tech analysis of a Fremont rock painting puts to rest a decades-long debate (details) Syrian archaeologist murdered by ISIS defending the historic resources of Palmyra (details)
  • Audio News for August 9 through 15, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    17 Aug 2015 | 10:03 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Mesolithic monolith found underwater off Sicily (details) Danish island dig studies five thousand year old temple (details) English example adds to mystery of medieval inscribed swords (details) New answers to mystery of Roanoke (details)
  • Audio News for August 2 through 8, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    10 Aug 2015 | 11:15 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Researchers work to decipher inscriptions from a 2,000-year old ritual bath in Jerusalem (details) Dancing priestess figurine at a Bulgarian Neolithic settlement may depict one of its venerable residents (details) New analysis of Siberian petroglyphs hints at Paleolithic origins (details) New study of botanical material from an Arizona cave reveals Puebloan tobacco use (details)
  • Audio News for July 26 to August 1, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    3 Aug 2015 | 11:36 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Bulgarian fortress yields new evidence of early liquor making (details) Neolithic site in Turkey yields new evidence on early village life (details) Roman bathhouse mosaic reveals army life on imperial eastern frontier (details) Remains from Jamestown colony identified as four early leaders (details)
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    NOSAS Archaeology Blog

  • Exploring High Pasture Cave with NOSAS

    nosas
    20 Aug 2015 | 2:52 pm
    by Karen Clarke (NOSAS) As part of a NOSAS trip organised by Beth Beresford to explore the exceptional archaeology of the Scottish Island of Skye Martin Wildgoose, and George Kozikowski guided us through Uamh an Ard Achadh (Cave of the High Field or High Pasture Cave).  Situated on the Broadford to Torrin road, it has been the focus of late Bronze and early Iron Age archaeological research.  Our guides were key members of the excavation team.  Since reading Martin Wildgoose’s excellent article in Skye Magazine 2011/2012 and hearing his colleague Steven Birch speak on the subject (both of…
  • Why do you read this blog?

    nosas
    13 Jul 2015 | 3:51 pm
    No archaeology in this post I’m afraid. Instead a request to participate in some interesting research on behalf of a master’s student from Leiden University. Fleur Schinning is conducting research into the reasons why people read archaeological blogs, with a view to seeing whether they improve the accessibility of the subject. She has created a short online questionnaire at http://goo.gl/forms/z3BAUTyYUL. You can preview the questionnaire in pdf form here. Participants are promised the chance to win 6 copies of Archaeology Magazine. We will also have the chance to see the…
  • Finding the Kinrara Bobbin Mill

    nosas
    8 Jul 2015 | 4:25 pm
    by Ann Wakeling (NOSAS) A long time ago Meryl Marshall sent me a picture of some old wooden sheds which might have been workshops, and some houses, situated in scattered birch woodland. The caption had ‘Kinrara Bobbin Mill’, did I know where it was? Checking the HER (MHG 23895) produced a Bobbin Mill with a grid ref NH 8700 0800, on Kinrara Estate. This is the intersection of grid lines meaning the site should be somewhere in that kilometer square. Most of the square is taken up by Tor Alvie, a steep sided hill, not very promising for an industrial site, the low ground is…
  • Cromarty Medieval Burgh Excavations 2014

    nosas
    27 Jun 2015 | 7:55 am
    by Mary Peteranna (AOC) Excavations to the north of Thief’s Row 2014 Our excavations in 2014 produced more informative data to assist with our research into the history of the Burgh of Cromarty including a more detailed picture of the layout and phasing of the buildings along each side of Thief’s Row, where our main excavation site is located (see a history of Thief’s Row) This includes the footings of three buildings shown on the 1880 Ordnance Survey map sheet on the north side of Thief’€™s Row, under which we identified the remains of another earlier structure,…
  • Rubh’ an Dunain, Skye: 8000 Years of History

    nosas
    23 Jun 2015 | 4:37 pm
    by Martin Wildgoose Aerial view of the Rubh’ an Dunain peninsula Members of NOSAS walking towards the tackman’s house on Rubh’ an Dunain. Canna is on the skyline. A warm sunny Sunday in early June saw NOSAS members gathering in the Glenbrittle campsite, at the foot of the Cuillin Mountains. The view south was spectacular, Canna seemed unusually close and South Uist and Barra lay in the haze on the horizon. Close at hand the Rubha an Dunain peninsular stretched out to the left of the bay with a ribbon of made-up path promising an easy walk to the point where 8000 years of…
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    eaglesanddragonspublishing.com

  • It’s Time for Research, Writing, and History!

    AdamAH
    10 Aug 2015 | 4:49 pm
    I’m going on vacation for the next few weeks, but you can see my daily posts here: Load More...Follow Me on Instagram I’ll be taking a pause from the blog until mid-September, but I won’t be off the radar. I’ve set myself a challenge. As part of my vacation abroad (you’ll have to follow the Instagram photo stream above to see where I am!), I’m hoping to write a full, first draft of my next book, tentatively titled Heart of Fire. I may be mad, but I’ve got the research done, and the story outlined. So, we’ll see. If the Muses are with me, I may feel the olive crown…
  • Facing Fear with the 300 Spartans

    AdamAH
    5 Aug 2015 | 5:12 pm
    Hear your fate, O dwellers in Sparta of the wide spaces; Either your famed, great town must be sacked by Perseus’ sons, Or, if that be not, the whole land of Lacedaemon Shall mourn the death of a king of the house of Heracles, For not the strength of lions or of bulls shall hold him, Strength against strength; for he has the power of Zeus, And will not be checked till one of these two he has consumed. The Pass at Thermopylae Thus spake the the Oracle at Delphi, long ago, as recorded by Herodotus, the ‘father of history’, in Book 7 of The Histories. This was the prophecy that…
  • Pythagoras’ Golden Verses – For a Good Life

    AdamAH
    27 Jul 2015 | 6:32 pm
    There has been a lot of negativity in the news these past weeks, mostly directed at Greece and Greek people. Many comments, including from high-profile public personages, have been outright prejudiced. Don’t worry. I’m not going to get into politics, who’s right, and who’s wrong, and how only the bankers seem to be winning anything. Ok, I slipped there. Sorry. With all the hatred and vitriol floating around the Web, I needed to go back to something uplifting, something ancient. I went back to a bit of research I had done on Pythagoras and the Golden Verses. These are a series of…
  • Ancient Everyday – Time for a Bath

    AdamAH
    21 Jul 2015 | 6:02 pm
    Showering, bathing and generally keeping clean is something that we take for granted today. For most people, washing is part of the daily routine. If you look at the Middle Ages, this was not the case. In fact, medieval people were pretty filthy. This isn’t surprising as bathing was considered a sin by many. This wasn’t the case for ancient Romans, thank the gods. As we do today, the Romans bathed and washed regularly, and as with going to the toilet, bathing was yet another very social activity for Romans. Throughout the Roman Empire, public and private baths were common, owing something…
  • Tiryns: Mycenaean Stronghold and Place of Legend

    AdamAH
    5 Jul 2015 | 9:51 am
    This week, I wanted to leave behind the sad and depressing subject of the destruction of heritage to write about a site steeped in myth and legend – Tiryns. “In the south-eastern corner of the plain of Argos, on the west and lowest and flattest of those rocky heights which here form a group, and rise like islands from the marshy plain, at a distance of 8 stadia, or about 1500 m. from the Gulf of Argos, lay the prehistoric citadel of Tiryns, now called Palaeocastron.” (Heinrich Schliemann; Tiryns; 1885) I visited the site with family during the summer of 2002. It was a scorcher…
 
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