Archaeology

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  • Lost Village Uncovered in England

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine
    26 Nov 2014 | 2:00 pm
    IRONBRIDGE GORGE, ENGLAND—In Shropshire, archaeologists have unearthed the remains of six cottages buried by a slow-moving landslide in 1952. "People were just literally able to see their houses being ripped apart, and there was nothing they could do about it," archaeologist Shane Kelleher of the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust told the BBC. Inside one of the homes archaeologists found an ornate mosaic floor, and other cottages are decorated with high-quality tiles, which the area was once famous for producing. The team will rebury the structures after recording them. To read about another…
  • Around the Archaeology Blog-o-sphere Digest #10

    Doug's Archaeology
    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    23 Nov 2014 | 5:31 am
    I have missed the last few weeks of this round-up but now I am back. Here is my weekly list of blog posts from Archaeology blogs/ blogs that focus on Archaeology. Purpose I am highlighting some of the other archeo-blogs out there by collecting all their posts from the previous week . Hopefully, you find some of the posts interesting and/or find a new blog to follow. Source I took these posts from my now updated list of archaeology blogs (440+ and counting). There are a few blogs that should be in this list that are missing — hoping to fix that. Here are this weeks posts–…
  • Glenarigolach Abandoned Township, Wester Ross

    NOSAS Archaeology Blog
    nosas
    15 Nov 2014 | 2:39 pm
    by Anne McInnes (NOSAS) Glenarigolach meaning ‘ glen of the forked shieling ‘ is accessed by a stalkers path leading up the hill on the E side of the Gruinard river. The area is centred on NG 98237 89963 and lies at a height of 100m. The glen was once well populated and Glenarigolach lies between the smaller settlements of Ridorcha and Craigour (See HER Record). Looking down the glen at Glenarigolach During the Highland Archaeology Festival 2014 NOSAS led a walk to the site on their second visit to the area. We were not quite so lucky with the weather as in April, but still enjoyed…
  • Did the Scots Burn Roman London?

    Theoretical Structural Archaeology
    Geoff Carter
    4 Nov 2014 | 4:07 pm
    At some point in the mid 120’s much of London Burnt  to the ground, around the same time construction of Hadrian’s Wall was apparently abandoned, could these events be connected - just how bad crisis in Roman Britain?“... under the rule of your grandfather Hadrian what a number of soldiers were killed by the Jews, what a number by the Britons”Marcus Cornelius Fronto, letter to Marcus Aurelius, AD162 It should be said at the outset, the use of the term “Scots” is generic for the people who still controlled the upper third of the island, and when Hadrian visited Britain…
  • Highland Henge Trail

    NOSAS Archaeology Blog
    nosas
    17 Nov 2014 | 1:06 pm
    by Roland Spencer-Jones (NOSAS) Henges in Highland seem to be a bit different from other UK henges. Smaller, later, less flamboyant. More akin to the quiet steady Highland temperament, perhaps. A henge is usually defined as a circular enclosure, surrounded by a ditch, surrounded by a bank, with one or two entrances. They can be, but don’t need to be, associated with internal burials, or standing stones, or posts. They are generally a varied lot. Although the earliest known UK henge is at Stenness in Orkney, approx 3100BC at the start of the later Neolithic, the biggest and most spectacular…
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    archaeology - Yahoo News Search Results

  • A bite of history

    28 Nov 2014 | 6:40 am
    Westcoast, particularly Andheri (E), offers the chance to open a window into India's massive culinary heritage
  • Archaeologists dig at ancient site near Syrian war

    23 Nov 2014 | 9:11 pm
    Nicolo Marchetti, right, a professor of archaeology and art history of the Ancient Near East at the University of Bologna, right, walks at an archaeologic site outside Karkemish, Turkey, meters away from the Turkey-Syria border and the Syrian city of Jarablous, Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014 Archaeology and war don't usually mix, yet that's been the case for years at Karkemish, an ancient city along ...
  • Most Popular

    23 Nov 2014 | 7:17 am
    A worker reconstructs the face of Buddha at the Jaulian stupa. — Dawn TAXILA: The archaeology department Taxila has started tampering with centuries-old Buddha statues at the Jualian stupa, sources in the department told Dawn.
  • Anthropologist uncovers issues of gender inequality in archaeology journals

    19 Nov 2014 | 1:55 pm
    On an archaeology field trip in New Mexico as an undergraduate in 2006, Dana Bardolph noticed something that struck her as an odd gender imbalance: The professor leading the dig was a men, while the graduate assistant and all but two of the 14 undergrads were women.
  • Digging for answers

    19 Nov 2014 | 1:45 pm
    ( University of California - Santa Barbara ) On an archaeology field trip in New Mexico as an undergraduate in 2006, Dana Bardolph noticed something that struck her as an odd gender imbalance: The professor leading the dig was a man, while the graduate assistant and all but two of the 14 undergrads were women.
 
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    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine

  • Paleolithic Venus Unearthed in France

    28 Nov 2014 | 1:30 pm
    AMIENS, FRANCE—On the second day of fieldwork this summer at the Paleolithic site of Renancourt, archaeologists discovered limestone fragments that seemed to have been worked by humans. "That same night we carefully pieced together the 20-odd fragments and realized it was a female statuette," archaeologist Clement Paris said at a press conference reported by CNews. The 4.7-inch limestone statue the team reassembled is a highly stylized depiction of a voluptuous woman, and resembles other famous Paleolithic "Venus" figurines discovered throughout Europe. “The fact that the…
  • Rare Finds Unearthed in Kent

    28 Nov 2014 | 1:00 pm
    AYLESHAM, ENGLAND—Archaeologists digging ahead of a housing construction project in Kent have unearthed an unusually rich array of artifacts, as well as an Anglo-Saxon skeleton. Among the objects discovered were Bronze Age cremation vessels, as well as Roman domestic artifacts. “The Bronze Age urns are rare, exotic, and wonderful and the ditches were full of very nice Roman domestic property so there was obviously a settlement nearby,” SWAT Archaeology’s Paul Wilkinson told The Dover Express. To read about a royal Anglo-Saxon site discovered in the area, see “The Kings of Kent.”
  • Lost Village Uncovered in England

    26 Nov 2014 | 2:00 pm
    IRONBRIDGE GORGE, ENGLAND—In Shropshire, archaeologists have unearthed the remains of six cottages buried by a slow-moving landslide in 1952. "People were just literally able to see their houses being ripped apart, and there was nothing they could do about it," archaeologist Shane Kelleher of the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust told the BBC. Inside one of the homes archaeologists found an ornate mosaic floor, and other cottages are decorated with high-quality tiles, which the area was once famous for producing. The team will rebury the structures after recording them. To read about another…
  • Neolithic Handax Discovered in Denmark

    26 Nov 2014 | 1:30 pm
    COPENHAGEN, DENMARK—A Neolithic ax still attached to its wooden handle has been discovered on the Danish island of Lolland. Archaeologists working ahead of the construction of a tunnel unearthed the artifact, which seems to have been ritually deposited on the seabed about 5,500 years ago. "Finding a hafted [handle-bearing] ax as well preserved as this one is quite amazing," Museum of Lolland-Falster archaeologist Soren Anker Sorensen told the BBC. Earlier this year, archaeologists on the project discovered footprints dating to the same period. To read about that discovery, see “Tunnel…
  • 19th-Century Homes of Feuding Families Investigated

    25 Nov 2014 | 2:00 pm
    HARDY, KENTUCKY—A team led by Kim McBride of the University of Kentucky has been excavating the site of the home of Randal McCoy, head of the McCoys of Kentucky. The home of the head of the Hatfield family, “Devil Anse” Hatfield of Saran Ann, West Virginia, is also under investigation. “I’m very pleased to say that something has been recovered at each of the locations,” Tony Tackett of Pike County Tourism told the Williamson Daily News. At the McCoy cabin, McBride has recovered parts of the cabin’s foundation, primitive glass, bullets, stained glass, nails, and fragments of…
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    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Ancient dental plaque: A 'Whey' into our milk drinking past?

    27 Nov 2014 | 6:49 am
    We drink milk because it is good for us, but we rarely stop to think "Why?" Archaeologists and geneticists have been puzzling this question since it was revealed that the mutations which enable adults to drink milk are under the strongest selection of any in the human genome.
  • Biopolitics for understanding social regulation and control

    24 Nov 2014 | 9:51 am
    People, as the biological beings that we are, can be socially regulated by mechanisms such as taxes, property or family relationships. This constitutes part of the social policy that the Roman government put into practice during its expansion throughout the Mediterranean, which left its mark on the eastern plateau of Spain, the historical Celt Iberian territory.
  • Laser from a plane discovers Roman goldmines in Spain

    20 Nov 2014 | 5:21 am
    Hidden under the vegetation and crops of the Eria Valley, in León (Spain), there is a gold mining network created by the Romans two thousand years ago, as well as complex hydraulic works, such as river diversions, to divert water to the mines of the precious metal. Researchers made the discovery from the air with an airborne laser teledetection system.
  • Out of India: Finding the origins of horses, rhinos

    20 Nov 2014 | 5:17 am
    Working at the edge of a coal mine in India, a team of researchers has filled in a major gap in science’s understanding of the evolution of a group of animals that includes horses and rhinos. That group likely originated on the subcontinent when it was still an island headed swiftly for collision with Asia, the researchers report.
  • Digging for answers: Gender inequality in archeology?

    19 Nov 2014 | 2:50 pm
    On an archaeology field trip in New Mexico an undergraduate noticed something that struck her as an odd gender imbalance: The professor leading the dig was a man, while the graduate assistant and all but two of the 14 undergrads were women.
 
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    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek

  • Descend into Roman mines in Spain on Strata: Portraits of Humanity

    Rick Pettigrew
    17 Nov 2014 | 11:24 am
    Friends and colleagues: Descend into Roman mines in northern Spain in the November edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV.In this episode we present “Metalla Oiassonis,” a film from Felix Ugarte Elkartea of Spain introducing us to the complex world of the ancient mining that the Romans developed at the ancient port city of Oiasso, located within the modern city today named Irun in Spanish and Gipuzkoa in Basque, in Spain near the French border.  In the western foothills of the Pyrenees and the next to the Bay of Biscay stands the granite massif called Aiako…
  • TOC & CFP, J. African Diaspora Archaeology & Heritage

    Christopher Fennell
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:41 am
    Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and HeritageVolume 3, No. 2, November 2014   This issue is now available online at:http://www.maneyonline.com/toc/jaf/3/2?ai=yo&ui=1yc&af=T ; Table of Contents Weaving the Second Skin: Protection Against Evil Among the Valongo Slaves in Nineteenth-century Rio de JaneiroBy Tania Andrade Lima Marcos André Torres de Souza Glaucia Malerba SeneJ. of African Diaspora Archaeology & Heritage, Vol. 3, No. 2: 103-136.http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/2161944114Z.00000000015?ai=yo&ui=1yc&af=T ; Toys with Professions: Racialized…
  • 2015 Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Field School, Great Blasket Island, Ireland

    Christopher Fennell
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:38 am
    2015 Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Field School, Great Blasket Island, IrelandUniversity of Illinois, Urbana-ChampaignMay 25 to July 3, 20156 weeks, 6 creditsThis field school in archaeology, history, heritage, and landscape studies will examine the lifeways of residents of Great Blasket Island (Blascaod Mor) off the southwest coast of the Dingle Peninsula (Corca Dhuibhne) of the Republic of Ireland. Great Blasket and its surrounding islands have been traversed by cultures leaving traces from fort sites thousands of years in age, to monastic dwellings and Viking incursions in the medieval…
  • Entry deadline extended to Nov. 15 for TAC Festival 2015 film entries

    Rick Pettigrew
    28 Oct 2014 | 2:17 pm
    To our film producer and distributor friends:  Due to multiple requests, we have extended the deadline for the last time for submitting entries for the 2015 edition of The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival.  This is the only international competition for this genre in the entire Western Hemisphere and a wonderful showcase for your work.  Our NEW deadline for receipt of entries is November 15, 2014.  TAC Festival 2015 takes place May 15-19, 2015, in the Recital Hall at The Shedd Institute and at the University of Oregon Baker Downtown Center here in Eugene, Oregon,…
  • Introducing Strata: Portraits of Humanity, online and on TV

    Rick Pettigrew
    15 Oct 2014 | 11:32 am
    Friends and colleagues: We are very excited today to launch Strata: Portraits of Humanity online and on TV! Please share this news with everyone who will listen. Unlike any other show available anywhere, Strata is a fresh monthly showcase for unique, captivating and diverse stories about our cultural heritage from an archaeological perspective. Besides that, it’s just plain fun to watch! We produce some of the segments ourselves and acquire the rest from our dozens of producer and distributor partners around the world. Our stories come from across the globe, ranging from North America to…
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    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog

  • 11th century altar unearthed during carpark construction

    noelbynature
    28 Nov 2014 | 4:46 am
    An 11th century altar, believed to be significant in the Ly Dynasty period of Vietnam, was unearthed during the construction of an underground car park. The Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences has written to the Prime Minister to intervene. 11th century altar unearthed in Hanoi. source: Thanh Nien News 20141126 Social scientists ask Vietnam’s PM to protect ancient altar Thanh Nien News, 26 November 2014 The Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences asked the prime minister to preserve an 11th century holy site that was unearthed during the construction of a new government center. The academy…
  • Job: Lecturer in Biological Anthropology, Otago University

    noelbynature
    28 Nov 2014 | 4:45 am
    The University of Otago is offering a fixed-term lectureship in Biological Anthropology. Closing date for applications is 16 January 2015. See the listing here. Related posts: Job: Assistant Professor in Cultural Anthropology (University of Washington) Job Opportunity: Lecturer in Archaeology, JCU Job opportunity: Lecturer in Southeast Asian history
  • Professor Higham receives social sciences award

    noelbynature
    28 Nov 2014 | 4:39 am
    Professor Charles Higham receives the Mason Durie Medal for social sciences, in recognition for his long work in understanding the archaeology of Southeast Asia. Academics honoured Otago Daily Times, 27 November 2014 Three leading University of Otago academics have received Royal Society of New Zealand national awards. Prof Parry Guilford was last night awarded the Sir Charles Hercus Medal for biomedical sciences, Prof Charles Higham received the Mason Durie Medal for social sciences, and Associate Prof Peter Dearden received the Callaghan Medal for science communication. … Prof Higham,…
  • Apsara Authority refutes claims about Angkor park ticketing

    noelbynature
    28 Nov 2014 | 4:32 am
    A couple more stories related to the license to issue tickets at Angkor. The Apsara Authority has refuted claims that the monuments have been rented out to an extra-national company. photo: Apsara Authority Rejects Claim Angkor Wat ‘Rented Out’ Cambodia Daily, 27 November 2014 Eyes on Aspara’s pot of gold TTR Weekly, 27 November 2014 The Apsara Authority, which manages the Angkor Archaeological Park in Siem Reap City, on Wednesday rejected claims made by popular opposition radio host Mam Sonando last week that the temple complex has been “rented out” to a Vietnamese company. Mr.
  • Global implications of Southeast Asian rock art

    noelbynature
    28 Nov 2014 | 12:28 am
    Earlier this week, the journal Antiquity published a paper entitled ‘The global implications of the early surviving rock art of greater Southeast Asia’, which I was a co-author of. The paper touches on a number of rock art projects that have happened in the recent years: my contribution was on the rock art of Gua Tambun in Malaysia, which I investigated as part of my MA, and the paper also touches on the rock art of Cambodia that later became part of my PhD thesis. Other regions included Thailand, Myanmar and Indonesia – the last of which is fresh in our minds because of…
 
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    Publishing Archaeology

  • "Get me off your f_____ mailing list!"

    Michael E. Smith
    23 Nov 2014 | 3:51 pm
    I'm sure we have all had this sentiment, given the increase in garbage emails inviting us to attend bogus conferences and publish in bogus journals. Fed up with this, two authors created a paper that consists primarily of the phrase "Get me off your f_____ mailing list," repeated several hundred times. They submitted it to the journal, International Journal of Advanced Computer Technology, whose editor accepted the paper!! This is hilarious. See the nice discussion on Scolarly Open Access, and don't neglect to read the comments. There is also some discussion on IFL-Science and elsewhere.The…
  • READ THIS ARTICLE !

    Michael E. Smith
    16 Nov 2014 | 2:26 pm
    Lund, Christian  (2014)  Of What is This a Case? Analytical Movements in Qualitative Social Science Research. Human Organization 73(3):224-234.I just read this article, and it is fantastic. Alison Rautman suggested it: Thanks, Alison! Yeah, maybe its weird to get excited about epistemology, but given the sorry state of argumentation in archaeology, we really need to talk more about epistemology. A good place to begin is with methods of case study analysis.Many, or perhaps most, archaeological studies are examples of case study research. That is, we are analyzing a small number of…
  • Social Science History Association, annual meeting

    Michael E. Smith
    7 Nov 2014 | 7:00 pm
    I am posting from Toronto, where I am attending the annual meeting of the Social Science History Association.  I've been a member of the SSHA for a few years; when I resigned from the American Anthropological Association in protest of their anti-science stance, I joined SSHA. I actually attended my first meeting in the 1980s, and published a paper in their journal, Social Science History, in 1987. But this is the first meeting I've attended since then. This has been an interesting weekend.Professionally, there are some things the SSHA does well at their meeting, much better than the…
  • Open Access Week

    Michael E. Smith
    19 Oct 2014 | 1:13 pm
    This coming week is "Open Access Week". Check out the central website, called Open access week. The promise and importance of open access was one of the main reasons I started this blog in 2007. Over the years I think I have grown cynical about the lack of progress in open access on most fronts, but I remain committed to the concept. I was asked by librarian Anali Perry to respond to several questions about open access; my responses (and several others) will be posted on the library website this week. Here are my replies: What is your experience with open access publishing?I write about…
  • How to make a weak argument

    Michael E. Smith
    12 Oct 2014 | 3:59 pm
    Suppose you are writing up some archaeological results. You will be making a bunch of arguments--statements that draw on data and theory to come to some conclusion of interest. Most works contain a number of arguments, often at different levels. For example you make claim that you found 41 pieces of obsidian in the lowest level and only 14 in the uppermost level. This is an argument, but it is not a particularly interesting one. You may later make a more interesting argument suggesting that the decline in obsidian was due to changing commercial routes that now avoided your site, or perhaps…
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    Middle Savagery

  • The Happy Accidents of Archaeological Drone Photography

    colleenmorgan
    14 Nov 2014 | 1:29 am
    Admittedly, 80% of the 227 photos are of grass. Blurry, impressionistic, green. The camera was set to time lapse, taking a photo every five seconds, and most people in the Heritage & Play group had a turn. A new person at the controls, and the angry-bee-buzz of the small white drone would signal lift-off. We all stood around it, watching it aloft, buzz around, then land. We were amateurs–this is not an effective group shot, but it’s lovely. It’s late autumn in England, the sun hangs low in the sky, prolonging the golden hour and lighting up the still-green fields.
  • Who Digs? Craft & Non-specialist labor in archaeology

    colleenmorgan
    9 Oct 2014 | 11:24 am
    Dan and I wrote a short polemic for Bill Caraher’s series on Craft and Archaeology. It was a hydra of a piece to write–we wanted to be succinct and direct, but it kept spiraling out of control. We obviously have a lot more to say on the subject, here’s a short excerpt: Digging is the most evocative archaeological practice, yet it is the most undervalued mode of archaeological knowledge production, least cultivated skill with fewest monetary rewards, and is considered so inconsequential that non-specialist labor is regularly employed to uncover our most critical data sets.
  • Book Review: Archaeographies

    colleenmorgan
    8 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Real Estate Open House, by Fotis Ifantidis My review of Fotis Ifantidis’ Archaeographies came out in the Journal of Contemporary Archaeology. I’m not sure why there aren’t figures, but oh well. A quote from the review: Out of the thousands of photographs taken at Dispilio, Ifantidis has selected examples that are, on the surface, aggressively non-archaeological. These photographs do not effectively document the archaeological record in a way that is acceptable as standard site photography: scales, when deployed, are haphazard, artifacts are scattered and in partial focus,…
  • 50 Years of Visualization at Çatalhöyük

    colleenmorgan
    7 Oct 2014 | 9:14 am
    As I previously mentioned, Jason Quinlan and I co-presented a poster at this year’s EAA in Istanbul. While it isn’t quite as brilliant as Alison Akins’ Plague Poster, I enjoyed putting something together about the photography at Çatalhöyük, especially with one of the primary photographers involved! Regardless, I’ve put our poster below. Of particular note is the immense increase in the size of the archive after Photoscan was introduced at Çatalhöyük. Jason and I collaborated on this remotely, and so there is some funny bits with converting between iterations of…
  • Punks, Hard Drives & Minecraft Archaeology

    colleenmorgan
    30 Sep 2014 | 6:31 am
    The inimitable Sara Perry and I have been working on the archaeological excavation of a hard drive, for science! We’ve been writing about it on Savage Minds, the Other blog about Savages. Here are the blog posts in order: What Archaeologists Do What Archaeologists Do: Between Archaeology and Media Archaeology What Archaeologists Do: Research Design and the Media Archaeology Drive Project (MAD-P) What Archaeologists Do: The Site Report & What it Means to Excavate a Hard Drive I’m also very excited that the Punk Archaeology volume has landed, be sure to download…
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    Looting Matters

  • Due Diligence at Christie's: time for change?

    David Gill
    28 Nov 2014 | 1:46 am
    Sardinian Figure from the Medici DossierSource: Tsirogiannis / ARCAThe decision to withdraw the Steinhardt Sardinian Figure from the 'Ancient Art' auction at Christie's in December raises some issues.First, did the Christie's antiquities team check the collecting history of the figure for themselves? It is clear from a simple and brief search that the figure had been owned by a private individual (who appeared to be represented as a gallery) and that the gallery where the figure was exhibited did not appear to own it. Why did Christie's present the information in the way that they did?Second,…
  • Announcing news on Thanksgiving Day

    David Gill
    27 Nov 2014 | 11:18 am
    Steinhardt Sardinian FigureSource: Tsirogiannis / ARCAThe apparent removal of the Steinhardt Sardinian figure from auction at Christie's is timely. After all, today is Thanksgiving Day. Eight years ago, also in late November, the J. Paul Getty Museum announced the return of its first batch of material to Italy.So perhaps it is a day to bury "bad news".But what is surprising is that a major institution like Christie's has not absorbed the lessons of the last eight years in what has become known as "The Medici Conspiracy".Academic researchers now realise that it is important to probe and…
  • Steinhardt Sardinian Figure Withdrawn From Sale

    David Gill
    27 Nov 2014 | 10:04 am
    Bloccata l'asta della Dea Madre - Pili, "risultato importantissimo, ora torni all'Isola" http://t.co/6qJMqzAA8N— Ansa Sardegna (@AnsaSardegna) November 27, 2014Many Italian news agencies now seem to be covering the decision by Christie's to withdraw the Sardinian figure from December's auction. The vendor was Michael Steinhardt.
  • Steinhardt Sardinian Figure: Update

    David Gill
    27 Nov 2014 | 6:49 am
    It appears that the Steinhardt Sardinian Figure has been withdrawn from auction at Christie's next month.
  • Christie's and "transparency"

    David Gill
    26 Nov 2014 | 10:52 am
    Sardinian figure from Medici DossierSource: Tsirogiannis / ARCABack in November 2009 (i.e. 5 years ago) some objects that passed through Christie's were seized and subsequently returned to Italy. When I contacted the press office at Christie's I was informed "the transparency of the public auction system combined with the efforts from the U.S. ICE and foreign governments, in this matter, led to the identification of two stolen artifacts". The Attic pelike and the Apulian situla have now been returned to Italy.Five years later, a Sardinian figure due to be auctioned at Christie's appears to…
 
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    Theoretical Structural Archaeology

  • Did the Scots Burn Roman London?

    Geoff Carter
    4 Nov 2014 | 4:07 pm
    At some point in the mid 120’s much of London Burnt  to the ground, around the same time construction of Hadrian’s Wall was apparently abandoned, could these events be connected - just how bad crisis in Roman Britain?“... under the rule of your grandfather Hadrian what a number of soldiers were killed by the Jews, what a number by the Britons”Marcus Cornelius Fronto, letter to Marcus Aurelius, AD162 It should be said at the outset, the use of the term “Scots” is generic for the people who still controlled the upper third of the island, and when Hadrian visited Britain…
  • Posthole Archaeology; Function, Form and Fighting

    Geoff Carter
    26 Oct 2014 | 1:19 pm
    In the previous post I posed the question what buildings does a moderately complex hierarchical agricultural society require, looking at aspects of agricultural buildings; this time I am looking at moderately complex hierarchical society, or at least that end of hierarchy that tends to represented in archaeology.It is fashionable, and perhaps progressive, to talk of higher status individuals or elites, to avoid cultural bias inherent such terms as aristocracy.   However, I use the term in its original cultural context precisely to reference that bias, or understanding, and…
  • Posthole archaeology; function, form and farming

    Geoff Carter
    25 Sep 2014 | 6:18 pm
    By the Bronze Age in British Isles, and certainly in terms of the proto-historic Late Iron Age, we have what historians might call petty kings and aristocracy, sometimes with a more wider regional and national institutions.  Although our museums have their weapons and treasures, architecturally, we have lost sight of the petty king in his palace and the homes of the aristocracy, always such a feature of our countryside.  But this is just the tip of an iceberg of ignorance, since we know very little of the charcoal burner in his hut, and have no real notion of cart sheds or byres;…
  • Dumbing down the past.

    Geoff Carter
    12 Sep 2014 | 5:14 pm
    Dumbing down through abstraction.In two previous posts, [ 1 + 2 ] I have demonstrated that one of the central images of British Prehistory, the Wessex Roundhouse, is a construct which does not accurately represent the evidence.  It is not a discovery, or rocket science, I just read the relevant reports and looked at the plans and sections. While I am happy to call these roundhouse constructs dumbing down, what to call the scholarship they generate presents a problem, since it represents the application of presumably perfectly acceptable theory to an imaginary data set. Archaeology…
  • Parish Notices; Help Nigel Hetherington of Past Preservers do the EH Wall Hike

    Geoff Carter
    4 Sep 2014 | 11:52 am
    On  19 of September Nigel Hetherington of Past Preservers, will be returning to his ancestral homelands and taking part in the English Heritage's Hadrian's Wall Hike to raise funds for much needed conservation along the famous route. Please Donate today to support Nigel and English Heritage, and share with your friends and colleagues. All of your donations and efforts are greatly appreciated, please Tweet your support to @Pastpreservers and @EnglishHeritage using the #HadriansHike hashtag and please spread the word! Things are not…
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    Stone Pages Archaeo News

  • Bronze Age dagger recovered in Norfolk

    28 Nov 2014 | 4:28 am
    A Middle Bronze Age ceremonial dagger ploughed up twelve years ago in a field in East Rudham, Norfolk, in the east of England, was used for years as a doorstop...
  • 4,000-year-old razor unearthed in Siberia

    28 Nov 2014 | 4:27 am
    A rudimentary razor blade used by men 4,000 years ago has been unearthed on the site of an ancient settlement in Siberia. Vyacheslav Molodin, the deputy head of the Siberian...
  • Experiment to build a partial replica of Stonehenge

    25 Nov 2014 | 2:06 am
    Twenty years ago a life-size replica of the three largest stones at Stonehenge were made for a television documentary, Secrets of Lost Empires - Stonehenge. The three stones weighing more...
  • Possible Paleolithic site in Northeastern China

    25 Nov 2014 | 2:05 am
    Chinese archeologists have recently discovered an ancient human occupation site in Dalian, Northeast China's Liaoning province. Animal skeletons were first discovered at a quarry in Luotuoshan Mountain last December, by...
  • Stone Age board game found in India

    25 Nov 2014 | 2:05 am
    Thavasimuthu, and Indian archaeologists, is claiming that a series of holes carved in a rock at Pannamparai village could be the prehistoric version of a traditional 'mancala' board game known...
 
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    The Archaeology News Network

  • Polish 'vampires' likely victims of cholera epidemic

    26 Nov 2014 | 8:30 am
    Potential 'vampires' buried in northwestern Poland with sickles and rocks across their bodies were likely local and not immigrants to the region, according to a study published November 26, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Lesley Gregoricka from University of South Alabama and colleagues. Individual 49/2012 (30-39 year old female) is shown with a sickle  placed across the neck [Credit: Amy Scott]In northwestern Poland,... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Recreating clothes from Norway's Iron Age

    26 Nov 2014 | 7:30 am
    A few years ago, the oldest known piece of clothing ever discovered in Norway, a tunic dating from the Iron Age, was found on a glacier in Breheimen. Now about to be reconstructed using Iron Age textile techniques, it is hoped the tunic will inspire Norwegian fashion designers. One of our aims in reconstructing the tunic is to learn more about how the textile  was made, how time-consuming it was to make, and how the wool was... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • New evidence of ancient rock art across Southeast Asia

    26 Nov 2014 | 6:30 am
    The latest research on the oldest surviving rock art of Southeast Asia shows that the region's first people, hunter-gatherers who arrived over 50,000 years ago, brought with them a rich art practice. Hand stencils like these ones were recently shown to have been made up to 40,000 years  ago in Sulawesi, Indonesia but are also found at the earliest surviving rock art sites  of northern Australia [Credit: Paul Taçon]Published... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Prehistoric conflict hastened human brain's capacity for collaboration

    26 Nov 2014 | 5:30 am
    Warfare not only hastened human technological progress and vast social and political changes, but may have greatly contributed to the evolutionary emergence of humans' high intelligence and ability to work together toward common goals, according to a new study from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). Warfare not only hastened human technological progress and vast social and political... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • More on Dozens of items found at Paphos Agora site

    25 Nov 2014 | 11:00 am
    The Department of Antiquities, Ministry of Communications and Works of Cyprus has issued an announcement presenting the results of the fourth season of excavations of the Department of Classical Archaeology of the Institute of Archaeology, Jagiellonian University (JU), Kraków, Poland within the framework of the Pafos Agora Project, which aims to explore and study the Agora of the ancient city of Nea Pafos, the capital of Cyprus in the... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    The Mathisen Corollary

  • Giving the blessing

    David Warner Mathisen
    27 Nov 2014 | 9:46 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).There is a movement by some to tar the celebration of Thanksgiving with the brush of imperialism, colonialism, and genocide, and to decry its celebration as misguided or insensitive or outmoded and in need of replacement (see for instance here and here).These sentiments are obviously a reaction to the horrendous record of violation and slaughter that did in fact follow the arrival of Europeans on the shores of the Americas. To be outraged at what took place in the centuries that followed that arrival is of course appropriate. We should be more aware of and…
  • The jury

    David Warner Mathisen
    26 Nov 2014 | 11:14 pm
    Darren Wilson Testimony Quotation from Lysander Spooner on the absolute importance of the jury of the people:"The trial by jury," then, is a "trial by the country" -- that is, by the people -- as distinguished from a trial by the government.It was anciently called "Trial per pais" -- that is, "trial by the country." And now, in every criminal trial, the jury are told that the accused "has, for trial, put himself upon the country; which country you (the jury) are."The object of this trial "by the country," or by the people, in preference to a trial by the government, is to…
  • The Ghost-Dance and contact with the spirit world

    David Warner Mathisen
    25 Nov 2014 | 12:45 am
    image: Ghost-Dance Religion and Wounded Knee, Mooney. page 933. Public domain (link).James Mooney (1861 - 1921) preserved, as best as he could do so, the Ghost-Dance movement of the late 1800s in his careful and thorough description of its extent, its teachings, and most importantly the dance itself. Mooney traveled extensively among the tribes who participated most, from the Arapaho and Sioux in the Great Plains all the way out across the Rockies, among the Paiute where the Ghost-Dance originated, and into California, where it reached all the way to the edge of the Pacific.The specific…
  • A thousand times more precious . . .

    David Warner Mathisen
    23 Nov 2014 | 9:56 am
    Alvin Boyd Kuhn wrote in Lost Light (1940) that:It is the purpose of the present volume to set forth to the modern mind the extent of the wreckage which splendid ancient wisdom suffered at the hands of later incompetence. [. . .] It involves the reversal of that mental process which in the days of early Christianity operated to change myth and allegory in the first instance over to factual history. As third century ignorance converted mythical typology to objective history, the task is now to convert alleged objective history back to mythology, and then to interpret it as enlightened…
  • Hour Two of my interview with Marty Leeds on the Mathemagical Radio Hour

    David Warner Mathisen
    20 Nov 2014 | 9:02 pm
    I really enjoyed the first part of my conversation with Marty Leeds on his Mathemagical Radio Hour, and we realized that we still had more important topics to discuss, so we continued for a second hour, which has just now been posted at the SyncBook web page as well as on iTunes and YouTube (the first hour of the interview can also be found at that same SyncBook web page, as well as on iTunes, and here on YouTube).We definitely ventured into some territory during this second hour that has not necessarily been addressed in other previous interviews!Again, special thanks to Marty for being…
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    Doug's Archaeology

  • Tay and Fife Archaeology Conference Videos, 2014

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    24 Nov 2014 | 1:32 am
    At the beginning of the month I was at the Tay and Fife Archaeology Conference and was lucky enough to have been asked to film some of the talks. I just got permission to publish the last video so here they all are. In no particular order, other than how they ended up in the playlist on YouTube, are the presentations from the conference: Tayside and Fife, 4000-1500BC: what we know and what we need to find out Sweetly Refined – ceramics from Dundee’s Sugar House Circling the square, re-imagining the Pittentian timber circle Adding a new dimension to Dundee’s carved stones…
  • Around the Archaeology Blog-o-sphere Digest #10

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    23 Nov 2014 | 5:31 am
    I have missed the last few weeks of this round-up but now I am back. Here is my weekly list of blog posts from Archaeology blogs/ blogs that focus on Archaeology. Purpose I am highlighting some of the other archeo-blogs out there by collecting all their posts from the previous week . Hopefully, you find some of the posts interesting and/or find a new blog to follow. Source I took these posts from my now updated list of archaeology blogs (440+ and counting). There are a few blogs that should be in this list that are missing — hoping to fix that. Here are this weeks posts–…
  • Scotland’s Community Heritage Conference 2014 Videos

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    22 Nov 2014 | 2:14 pm
    I have been MIA recently from this blog. That is because I have been video recording conferences over the last few weeks and the editing the videos takes up a lot of time. First up is Scotland’s Community Heritage Conference, held in Crief two weeks ago. It was a pretty amazing conference. With talks focusing on community heritage projects and workshops delivering excellent training. Alex made a mural of the talks: Here were the talks: Ian Walford, joint CEO of RCAHMS & Historic Scotland, opens the 2014 Scotland’s Community Heritage Conference Still waiting on some…
  • Around the Archaeology Blog-o-sphere Digest #9

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    2 Nov 2014 | 2:17 pm
    Here is my weekly list of blog posts from Archaeology blogs/ blogs that focus on Archaeology. Purpose I am highlighting some of the other archeo-blogs out there by collecting all their posts from the previous week . Hopefully, you find some of the posts interesting and/or find a new blog to follow. Source I took these posts from my now updated list of archaeology blogs (415+ and counting). There are a few blogs that should be in this list that are missing — hoping to fix that. Here are this weeks posts–   rcnnolly.wordpress.com AmeriCorps, Archaeology, and Service…
  • With Archaeology and Science Under Assault How Many Allies Do We Have? – Number of People with Archaeology Degrees

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    27 Oct 2014 | 12:00 am
    A few months ago I posted an estimation of the number of people with Archaeology degrees from US Universities. I have since done quite a bit more research on the subject. My initial estimates are probably too high for undergraduate degrees. But, I also found some associated degrees i.e. CRM, and pushed the data back to 1894- the year the first Archaeology PhD was given out (Add that question to the Antiquity quiz at this year’s TAG conference).  I have compiled it all together into a piece for the SAA Archaeological Record (SAAAR) and submitted it last week. I am posting in here for…
 
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    Cultural Heritage Lawyer Rick St. Hilaire

  • CHL Selected as One of ABA Journal's Blawg 100

    24 Nov 2014 | 5:59 pm
    Editors of the ABA Journal announced today the selection of Cultural Heritage Lawyer as one of its top 100 best blogs.Now that the editors have made their picks, the ABA Journal is asking readers to weigh in and vote for their favorites in each of the 8th Annual Blawg 100’s thirteen categories.Click here to register and vote. Vote for CHL in the "Niche" blog category. Voting ends at close of business on Dec. 19, 2014.CHL is grateful for the honor. Many thanks go to the blog's loyal readers, who make about 15,000 page views per month.ABA Journal Editor and Publisher Allen Pusey remarked…
  • House Bill Calls for Cultural Property Protection Czar and for Import Restrictions on Syrian Heritage in Jeopardy

    17 Nov 2014 | 3:00 am
    “The fight to preserve our common cultural heritage, as well as to deny extremists such as ISIL [Islamic State in Iraq and Syria] resources from the sale of blood antiquities, is yet another front on the global war against terror,” proclaimed Congressman Chris Smith (R-N.J.-4) in a press statement issued last week.Congressmen Eliot Engel and Chris Smith, sponsors of theProtect and Preserve International Cultural Property Act.Rep. Smith, together with Rep. Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.-16), introduced the Protect and Preserve International Cultural Property Act (H.R. 5703) in the U.S.
  • The Cultural Property Cases of AG Nominee Loretta Lynch

    7 Nov 2014 | 7:22 pm
    U.S. Attorney Loretta LynchIt is not every day that an attorney general nominee actually has a record of handling cultural property forfeitures and prosecutions. But that is the case with Loretta Lynch, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York.Lynch is President Barack Obama's choice to replace outgoing Attorney General Eric Holder.Lynch's office has handled a few heritage trafficking cases, including...1. U.S. v. One Alioramus Dinosaur SkullLynch's office filed a civil forfeiture complaint last month to forfeit a 65 million year old dinosaur skull. Prosecutors alleged…
  • Victoria Reed Headlines the 2014 Daniel Webster International Lawyer of the Year Ceremony Acclaiming Cultural Heritage Law

    5 Nov 2014 | 3:27 pm
    Dr. Victoria Reed and Attorney Rick St. Hilaire answer questions from an audience of legal and cultural heritage professionals at the Daniel Webster International Lawyer of the Year ceremony held in Manchester, NH. Van McLeod, Commissioner of the NH Department of Cultural Resources (pictured at far left), listens with interest.Photo courtesy of Norman St. Hilaire.International lawyers gathered last week at the New Hampshire law firm of Sheehan Phinney Bass + Green to recognize the positive impact made by international cultural heritage law to protect cultural property around…
  • Terrorism and Financial Intelligence Undersecretary Points to Antiquities Trafficking as a Source of ISIS Funding

    23 Oct 2014 | 7:22 pm
    David CohenSource: U.S. TreasuryThe Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) earns most of its cash from oil revenues, approximately $1 million per day. But the terror group also profits from crimes that include heritage trafficking."They lay waste to thousands of years of civilization in Iraq and Syria by looting and selling antiquities," David Cohen said today.As the federal government's point-man in charge of uncovering and blocking financial support for terrorist groups, Under Secretary Cohen's insight on the topic should be given considerable weight. Since 2011, Attorney Cohen has served…
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    AntiquityNOW

  • Happy Thanksgiving from AntiquityNOW!

    AntiquityNOW
    27 Nov 2014 | 2:00 am
    In between feasting and football, check out our previous posts on Thanksgiving and the foods we enjoy on this holiday! Bon Appetit Wednesday! Seaweed for Thanksgiving? Bon Appetit Wednesday! Roasted Leeks and Apples: A Thanksgiving Savory and Sweet Bon Appetit Wednesday! Why … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! Why Do We Eat Turkey on Thanksgiving?

    AntiquityNOW
    26 Nov 2014 | 2:00 am
    Why don’t we eat hot dogs on Thanksgiving? Or a seafood feast? Whether it’s roasted, smoked or fried, with cranberry sauce or smothered in gravy, turkey is synonymous with Thanksgiving in the United States and has even infiltrated various other … Continue reading →
  • Maps, Part I: Defining and Explaining our Past, Present and Future

    AntiquityNOW
    25 Nov 2014 | 2:00 am
    History can be difficult to understand. The way it is told and interpreted depends on the point of view of a person or a culture, the time period from which it is being viewed and a thousand other variables that … Continue reading →
  • KIDS’ BLOG! Do You Love Being Fashionable? So Did Our Ancient Ancestors!

    AntiquityNOW
    20 Nov 2014 | 2:00 am
    Update! This post was originally published on September 27, 2013. In the post below we bring you fascinating information about an ancient sweater found last year in Norway that is remarkably similar to some of the fashions we wear today. … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday: Celebrating Germany’s National Soup Day!

    AntiquityNOW
    19 Nov 2014 | 2:00 am
    It’s National Soup Day in Germany. Time to break out your best potato, cabbage or lentil soup, cozy up to a toasty fire and warm your bones. But of course, soup isn’t just appreciated in Germany. It’s a dish enjoyed … Continue reading →
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    Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica

  • Audio News for November 16 to 22, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    24 Nov 2014 | 4:59 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Early high altitude farm sites studied on the Tibetan Plateau (details) Sunken town found off Greek island of Delos (details) New investigations shed light on Utah's ancient Promontory Culture (details) Italian team explores ancient ruins at Turkish border site within sight of modern war (details)
  • Audio News for November 9 to November 15, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    17 Nov 2014 | 9:03 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Twin infant burials from a Paleoindian site in Alaska (details) Glass dish from 5th-century Japanese tomb has 2nd-century Roman origins (details) Tomb of a Han Chinese elite holds elaborate mural and poetry (details) Modern technology explains the ancient technology of China’s terra-cotta army (details)
  • Audio News for November 2 to November 8, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    10 Nov 2014 | 10:32 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Caribbean shipwreck is 17th century Dutch warship (details) Historic English home had witchmarks as protection from demons (details) Egyptian project reconstructs the lives of Roman era children (details) New discoveries in the ancient city of King Midas (details)
  • Audio News for October 26 to November 1, 2014>

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    3 Nov 2014 | 6:40 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Archaeologists take a new look at ancient Middle Eastern stone circles (details) Tunnel and chambers beneath Teotihuacan may hold remains of city elites (details) Archaeologists in coastal Peru find more sacrificed children and llamas (details) 2,600-year old Greek wine cup may depict constellations (details)
  • Audio News for October 19 to 25, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    27 Oct 2014 | 8:06 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: High-altitude site raises new questions about Ice Age occupation in the Andes (details) Christian quarter found in trading city built by the Golden Horde (details) Gladiator bone analysis confirms vegetarian diet and power drink made of ashes (details) Genetic study shows early links between Easter Island and South America (details)
 
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    NOSAS Archaeology Blog

  • Highland Henge Trail

    nosas
    17 Nov 2014 | 1:06 pm
    by Roland Spencer-Jones (NOSAS) Henges in Highland seem to be a bit different from other UK henges. Smaller, later, less flamboyant. More akin to the quiet steady Highland temperament, perhaps. A henge is usually defined as a circular enclosure, surrounded by a ditch, surrounded by a bank, with one or two entrances. They can be, but don’t need to be, associated with internal burials, or standing stones, or posts. They are generally a varied lot. Although the earliest known UK henge is at Stenness in Orkney, approx 3100BC at the start of the later Neolithic, the biggest and most spectacular…
  • Glenarigolach Abandoned Township, Wester Ross

    nosas
    15 Nov 2014 | 2:39 pm
    by Anne McInnes (NOSAS) Glenarigolach meaning ‘ glen of the forked shieling ‘ is accessed by a stalkers path leading up the hill on the E side of the Gruinard river. The area is centred on NG 98237 89963 and lies at a height of 100m. The glen was once well populated and Glenarigolach lies between the smaller settlements of Ridorcha and Craigour (See HER Record). Looking down the glen at Glenarigolach During the Highland Archaeology Festival 2014 NOSAS led a walk to the site on their second visit to the area. We were not quite so lucky with the weather as in April, but still enjoyed…
  • Old routes through Ross-shire: Luib, near Achnasheen, to Scardroy in Strathconon

    nosas
    14 Oct 2014 | 3:24 pm
    by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS) A six mile stretch of rough moorland, west of Achnasheen, is traversed by what was once a well made road generally 3 metres in width. Although it has fallen into disuse and is travelled only by the occasional walker, possibly doing a coast to coast trip, the road today is very distinct and forms a pleasant days’ ramble, especially when combined with an outward journey to Achnasheen on the Kyle of Lochalsh train (with homeward transport parked at Scardroy). But what are the origins of the road? and why did it fall out of use? A route through Strathconon to Loch…
  • Pictish Burial Practices and Remains

    nosas
    12 Oct 2014 | 8:34 am
    by Roland Spencer-Jones (NOSAS) These notes are in preparation for NOSAS field trips to two recognised Pictish cemeteries in the Highland region – Garbeg near Drumnadrochit on Saturday 1st November 2014. See Highland Council HER, RCAHMS Canmore Whitebridge near Foyers on Sunday March 8th 2015. See HER, RCAHMS Canmore The Picts, those most elusive of early medieval Scottish peoples, seem to have disposed of their dead in a variety of ways. Remains that can still be found in the landscape include cremations, simple burials in the ground, long cist burials, burials under cairns, and burials…
  • Excavations at Rhynie 2014

    nosas
    4 Oct 2014 | 1:04 pm
    by Cathy MacIver (Rhynie Community Archaeologist, CMS Archaeology) Earlier in September the Village Square in Rhynie, Aberdeenshire was a bustling hive of activity. Archaeologists, artists and locals got together for a week-long celebration of heritage and hospitality during the Art and Artefact Project (funded by HLF). This project was a collaboration between Dr Gordon Noble (University of Aberdeen) and Rhynie Woman, a local artists collective. The project capitalised on the research and fieldwork undertaken in and around Rhynie since 2005 by Gordon (Aberdeen) and Meggen (Chester) as part…
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