Archaeology

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  • Discovery of official clay seals support existence of biblical kings David and Solomon, archaeologists say

    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily
    16 Dec 2014 | 7:04 am
    Six official clay seals found by an archaeological team at a small site in Israel offer evidence that supports the existence of biblical kings David and Solomon. Many modern scholars dismiss David and Solomon as mythological figures and believe no kingdom could have existed in the region at the time the Bible recounted their activities. The new finds provide evidence that some type of government activity was conducted there in that period.
  • Possible Viking Vessel Identified in Canada

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine
    18 Dec 2014 | 2:00 pm
    OTTAWA, CANADA—Traces of bronze and glass have been detected on a piece of a small, 1,000-year-old stone vessel recovered from Baffin Island in the 1960s. According to Patricia Sutherland of the University of Aberdeen, Peter Thompson of Peter H. Thompson Geological Consulting, Ltd., and Patricia Hunt of the Geological Survey of Canada, who published their findings in the journal Geoarchaeology, the container was used as a crucible for melting bronze and casting small tools or ornaments. The glass formed when the rock was heated to high temperatures. Indigenous peoples of the Canadian Arctic…
  • Pre-historic site spotted in Nalgonda

    archaeology - Yahoo News Search Results
    21 Dec 2014 | 10:19 am
    The Department of Archaeology has identified a rare pre-historic period habitation near Pazzur village of Thipparthi mandal in Nalgonda district. Retired senior caretaker, A. Bhanu Murthy and Tech...
  • Coin Cache Discovered at Copenhagen’s Kastellet

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine
    19 Dec 2014 | 2:00 pm
    COPENHAGEN, DENMARK—According to The Copenhagen Post, a cache of coins has been discovered at Kastellet, a star-shaped fortress in the center of Copenhagen that was built in the seventeenth century. The coins, nine copper and 23 silver, date between 1649 and 1787. Most of them had been minted in Copenhagen, although some came from Norway and Germany. Musket balls and other pieces of ammunition were also found during the restoration work at the fortress, which is being conducted by the Museum of Copenhagen. 
  • Visit Turkey and see a Florida shipwreck on Strata: Portraits of Humanity

    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek
    Rick Pettigrew
    16 Dec 2014 | 9:05 am
    Friends and colleagues: Take a tour of Turkey’s Anatolia region and inspect a Florida shipwreck in the December edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV. In this episode we highlight eastern and southeastern Anatolia in Turkey,which has great scenic beauty and is an archaeological wonderland with clear traces of many civilizations. It includes Mt. Nimrud, with a massive burial mound and monumental statues placed at the summit 2000 years ago. Also this time, we see the 2011 excavations on the English China Shipwreck in Biscayne National Park, Florida, where the…
 
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    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine

  • Coin Cache Discovered at Copenhagen’s Kastellet

    19 Dec 2014 | 2:00 pm
    COPENHAGEN, DENMARK—According to The Copenhagen Post, a cache of coins has been discovered at Kastellet, a star-shaped fortress in the center of Copenhagen that was built in the seventeenth century. The coins, nine copper and 23 silver, date between 1649 and 1787. Most of them had been minted in Copenhagen, although some came from Norway and Germany. Musket balls and other pieces of ammunition were also found during the restoration work at the fortress, which is being conducted by the Museum of Copenhagen. 
  • Blick Mead in Path of Proposed Stonehenge Tunnel

    19 Dec 2014 | 1:34 pm
    AMESBURY, ENGLAND—The site of a Mesolithic camp known as Blick Mead, or Vespasian’s Camp, could be destroyed if a new 1.8-mile-long tunnel for the A303 is dug near Stonehenge. The 6,000-year-old camp is located about a mile and a half away from the monument, and is thought to have been occupied by hunter-gatherers who returned to Britain after the Ice Age. The bones of aurochs, flint tools, and possible structures have been uncovered. “Our only chance to find out about the earliest chapter of Britain’s history could be wrecked if the tunnel goes ahead,” David Jacques of the…
  • The Search for Spanish Vikings

    19 Dec 2014 | 1:00 pm
    ABERDEEN, SCOTLAND—Irene García Losquiño of the University of Aberdeen is conducting the first comprehensive study of Viking sites in Spain. “There are written accounts of Viking raids in northern Spain but, archaeologically, absolutely nothing has been done on an academic scale,” she said. She visited Galicia, in northern Spain, last spring, when a number of Viking anchors washed ashore in a storm. Working with Jan Henrik Fallgren of the University of Aberdeen and Ylva Backstrom of the University of Lund, García Losquiño found tell-tale signs of Vikings. “On the beach where the…
  • Possible Viking Vessel Identified in Canada

    18 Dec 2014 | 2:00 pm
    OTTAWA, CANADA—Traces of bronze and glass have been detected on a piece of a small, 1,000-year-old stone vessel recovered from Baffin Island in the 1960s. According to Patricia Sutherland of the University of Aberdeen, Peter Thompson of Peter H. Thompson Geological Consulting, Ltd., and Patricia Hunt of the Geological Survey of Canada, who published their findings in the journal Geoarchaeology, the container was used as a crucible for melting bronze and casting small tools or ornaments. The glass formed when the rock was heated to high temperatures. Indigenous peoples of the Canadian Arctic…
  • Cathedral Builders Reinforced Stone With Iron

    18 Dec 2014 | 1:30 pm
    PARIS, FRANCE—A team of French researchers from the Laboratoire archéomatériaux et prévision de l’altération, the Laboratoire de mesure du carbone 14, and the Université Paris 8, has extracted carbon from the iron used to support Gothic cathedrals, and used radiocarbon dating and archaeological evidence to determine that such reinforcements had been implemented in the initial phase of construction. It had been thought that metal reinforcements were added during later modifications or repairs to the stone structures. Up until Europe’s Middle Ages, iron ore was smelt in furnaces…
 
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    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek

  • Visit Turkey and see a Florida shipwreck on Strata: Portraits of Humanity

    Rick Pettigrew
    16 Dec 2014 | 9:05 am
    Friends and colleagues: Take a tour of Turkey’s Anatolia region and inspect a Florida shipwreck in the December edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV. In this episode we highlight eastern and southeastern Anatolia in Turkey,which has great scenic beauty and is an archaeological wonderland with clear traces of many civilizations. It includes Mt. Nimrud, with a massive burial mound and monumental statues placed at the summit 2000 years ago. Also this time, we see the 2011 excavations on the English China Shipwreck in Biscayne National Park, Florida, where the…
  • Descend into Roman mines in Spain on Strata: Portraits of Humanity

    Rick Pettigrew
    17 Nov 2014 | 11:24 am
    Friends and colleagues: Descend into Roman mines in northern Spain in the November edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV.In this episode we present “Metalla Oiassonis,” a film from Felix Ugarte Elkartea of Spain introducing us to the complex world of the ancient mining that the Romans developed at the ancient port city of Oiasso, located within the modern city today named Irun in Spanish and Gipuzkoa in Basque, in Spain near the French border.  In the western foothills of the Pyrenees and the next to the Bay of Biscay stands the granite massif called Aiako…
  • TOC & CFP, J. African Diaspora Archaeology & Heritage

    Christopher Fennell
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:41 am
    Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and HeritageVolume 3, No. 2, November 2014   This issue is now available online at:http://www.maneyonline.com/toc/jaf/3/2?ai=yo&ui=1yc&af=T ; Table of Contents Weaving the Second Skin: Protection Against Evil Among the Valongo Slaves in Nineteenth-century Rio de JaneiroBy Tania Andrade Lima Marcos André Torres de Souza Glaucia Malerba SeneJ. of African Diaspora Archaeology & Heritage, Vol. 3, No. 2: 103-136.http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/2161944114Z.00000000015?ai=yo&ui=1yc&af=T ; Toys with Professions: Racialized…
  • 2015 Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Field School, Great Blasket Island, Ireland

    Christopher Fennell
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:38 am
    2015 Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Field School, Great Blasket Island, IrelandUniversity of Illinois, Urbana-ChampaignMay 25 to July 3, 20156 weeks, 6 creditsThis field school in archaeology, history, heritage, and landscape studies will examine the lifeways of residents of Great Blasket Island (Blascaod Mor) off the southwest coast of the Dingle Peninsula (Corca Dhuibhne) of the Republic of Ireland. Great Blasket and its surrounding islands have been traversed by cultures leaving traces from fort sites thousands of years in age, to monastic dwellings and Viking incursions in the medieval…
  • Entry deadline extended to Nov. 15 for TAC Festival 2015 film entries

    Rick Pettigrew
    28 Oct 2014 | 2:17 pm
    To our film producer and distributor friends:  Due to multiple requests, we have extended the deadline for the last time for submitting entries for the 2015 edition of The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival.  This is the only international competition for this genre in the entire Western Hemisphere and a wonderful showcase for your work.  Our NEW deadline for receipt of entries is November 15, 2014.  TAC Festival 2015 takes place May 15-19, 2015, in the Recital Hall at The Shedd Institute and at the University of Oregon Baker Downtown Center here in Eugene, Oregon,…
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    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog

  • Taiwanese fossils go on display

    noelbynature
    21 Dec 2014 | 5:17 pm
    Replicas of human skeletons found in Taiwan are being displayed at the Taiwan National Museum of History until January. Liang Islander Fossils. Source: Focus Taiwan 20141211 Replicas of Taiwan’s earliest human fossils to go on display Friday Focus Taiwan, 11 December 2014 Replicas of Liang Islander fossils, two ancient human skeletons excavated from Taiwan’s outlying Matsu Islands, will go on display Friday in Taipei. “The Liang Islander and Prehistoric Culture of Matsu Islands” exhibition at the National Museum of History will feature replicas of the skeletons, as…
  • New discoveries from the Thang Long Citadel

    noelbynature
    21 Dec 2014 | 4:58 pm
    Archaeologists discover evidence for multiple dynastic occupation at the Thang Long Citadel site. Unearthed layers beneath the Thang Long Citadel. Source: Viet Nam Net 20141217 New discoveries made at Thang Long Citadel announced Viet Nam News, 17 December 2014 More vestiges found in Thang Long Citadel Viet Nam News, 17 December 2014 Previously, scientists had only found relics from two dynasties at Thang Long Royal Citadel, but this year they had a major breakthrough when they were able to identify objects from several more dynasties at the historical site. Archaeologists announced the news…
  • Phnom Bakheng vendors protest move

    noelbynature
    21 Dec 2014 | 4:43 pm
    Shop vendors at the foot of Phnom Bakheng at the Angkor Archaeological Park are protesting their relocation by the Apsara Authority. Vendors at Angkor protesting. Source: Phnom Penh Post 20141216 Vendors near Angkor refuse to move stalls Phnom Penh Post, 16 December 2014 Vendors at the foot of Bakheng Mountain, near Angkor Wat, have refused to relocate, saying that new stalls promised by the Apsara Authority are too small and the site is too far away. Thirty-nine of 60 vendors protested yesterday against the authority’s plans to move their businesses – which mostly sell souvenirs, food…
  • Statues discovered underneath Vietnamese temple

    noelbynature
    21 Dec 2014 | 4:28 pm
    Four statues have been discovered underneath a 700-year-old pagoda in Viet Nam’s Quang Binh province. Ancient statues discovered under Quang Binh pagoda Viet Nam News, 13 December 2014 Four statues were found in central Quang Binh Province during an excavation conducted for the restoration of a 700-year-old Buddhist pagoda. The statues, three wooden and one bronze, were found under the foundation of the ancient Hoang Phuc Pagoda in the province’s My Thuy Commune. These depicted men wearing feudal Mandarin-style clothes with complicated carvings. Each wooden statue weighed…
  • Experimental kiln built at the EFEO

    noelbynature
    21 Dec 2014 | 4:11 pm
    It’s experimental archaeology at work: the re-creation of an Angkorian style kiln by archaeologists at the Ecole Française d’Extreme Orient in Siem Reap. Kiln firing at the EFEO earlier this month Recreating the kilns of Angkor Phnom Penh Post, 13 December 2014 Archaeologists hope to discover more about Angkorian civilisation by using ancient pottery-making techniques The Angkorian Khmers were prolific ceramics makers, and the Angkor Archaeological Park is still littered with fragments of ancient pots and bowls that were used in households and temples for storing water, foods, oils…
 
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    Publishing Archaeology

  • Archaeology in France and Germany

    Michael E. Smith
    21 Dec 2014 | 4:46 pm
    Roman amphitheater in ParisI just returned from a trip to Paris and Bonn. In Paris I sat on the dissertation defense committee of Marion Forest. Marion passed with highest honors. Her dissertation is a social-spatial analysis of sites on the Malpais de Zacapu in Michoacan, Mexico. This is a lava flow with several large, densely-packed settlements with extraordinary architectural preservation. Her dissertation is quite good, with lots of good spatial and architectural data, and some information on artifacts:Forest, Marion2014    L'organisation sociospatiale des agglomérations…
  • "Get me off your f_____ mailing list!"

    Michael E. Smith
    23 Nov 2014 | 3:51 pm
    I'm sure we have all had this sentiment, given the increase in garbage emails inviting us to attend bogus conferences and publish in bogus journals. Fed up with this, two authors created a paper that consists primarily of the phrase "Get me off your f_____ mailing list," repeated several hundred times. They submitted it to the journal, International Journal of Advanced Computer Technology, whose editor accepted the paper!! This is hilarious. See the nice discussion on Scolarly Open Access, and don't neglect to read the comments. There is also some discussion on IFL-Science and elsewhere.The…
  • READ THIS ARTICLE !

    Michael E. Smith
    16 Nov 2014 | 2:26 pm
    Lund, Christian  (2014)  Of What is This a Case? Analytical Movements in Qualitative Social Science Research. Human Organization 73(3):224-234.I just read this article, and it is fantastic. Alison Rautman suggested it: Thanks, Alison! Yeah, maybe its weird to get excited about epistemology, but given the sorry state of argumentation in archaeology, we really need to talk more about epistemology. A good place to begin is with methods of case study analysis.Many, or perhaps most, archaeological studies are examples of case study research. That is, we are analyzing a small number of…
  • Social Science History Association, annual meeting

    Michael E. Smith
    7 Nov 2014 | 7:00 pm
    I am posting from Toronto, where I am attending the annual meeting of the Social Science History Association.  I've been a member of the SSHA for a few years; when I resigned from the American Anthropological Association in protest of their anti-science stance, I joined SSHA. I actually attended my first meeting in the 1980s, and published a paper in their journal, Social Science History, in 1987. But this is the first meeting I've attended since then. This has been an interesting weekend.Professionally, there are some things the SSHA does well at their meeting, much better than the…
  • Open Access Week

    Michael E. Smith
    19 Oct 2014 | 1:13 pm
    This coming week is "Open Access Week". Check out the central website, called Open access week. The promise and importance of open access was one of the main reasons I started this blog in 2007. Over the years I think I have grown cynical about the lack of progress in open access on most fronts, but I remain committed to the concept. I was asked by librarian Anali Perry to respond to several questions about open access; my responses (and several others) will be posted on the library website this week. Here are my replies: What is your experience with open access publishing?I write about…
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    Looting Matters

  • Selling Antiquities in New York

    David Gill
    12 Dec 2014 | 1:35 pm
    © David Gill, 2014The two big sales of antiquities at Christie's and Sotheby's have taken place in New York this week. It is time to review the year.First it is clear that there has been a steady decrease each year from 2010 ($133.8 million) to the present $26.8 million. And that is nearly a $6 million drop since 2013.Sotheby's has yielded more than Christie's for the third year in a row. This year's difference was more than $2.5 million. (Last year was $7.5 million, so the gap is narrowing.)Both auction houses have had to address issues relating to the so-called "toxic antiquities" that…
  • Symes Statue Unsold at Sotheby's

    David Gill
    12 Dec 2014 | 11:32 am
    Egyptian statue from Schinoussa ArchiveSource: ARCA / TsirogiannisIt seems that the Egyptian statue that had appeared to pass through the hands of Robin Symes has been left unsold at Sotheby's today.
  • Robin Symes, the Egyptian Priest and Sotheby's

    David Gill
    12 Dec 2014 | 1:32 am
    Egyptian priest from Schinoussa ArchiveSource: ARCA / TsirogiannisLater today Sotheby's will be auctioning "AN EGYPTIAN DIORITE FIGURE OF A PRIEST OF THE TEMPLE OF MUT, LATE 25TH/EARLY 26TH DYNASTY, CIRCA 670-610 B.C." (lot 6). The collecting history is provided:private collection (Christie's, London, April 27th, 1976, no. 135, illus.) Khnoum, Geneva, 1992 Drouot-Richelieu, Paris, October 1st, 1996, no. 462, illus. Safani Gallery, New York Jack Josephson Collection (Sotheby’s, New York, June 5th, 2008, lot 57, illus.) In 2008 it sold for $422,500.Who was the vendor…
  • Christie's: withdrawn lots

    David Gill
    11 Dec 2014 | 11:11 am
    Attic red-figured krater / SwinglerSource: TsirogiannisThose following Christie's sale of antiquities will have noted the following lots have been withdrawn:Lot 51: AN EGYPTIAN ALABASTER FIGURAL JUG. "This Lot is Withdrawn."Lot 95: Athenian red-figured krater. "This Lot is Withdrawn."Lot 133: A FALISCAN BLACK-GLAZED ASKOS. "This lot has been withdrawn from the sale." Collecting history: "with Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva, 1997"; "PROPERTY FROM THE MICHAEL AND JUDY STEINHARDT COLLECTION".Lot 139: A ROMAN MARBLE COLUMN CAPITAL. "This Lot is Withdrawn."Dr Christos Tsirogannis had linked lot 95 to…
  • Why loan the odd pedimental sculpture from the Parthenon?

    David Gill
    10 Dec 2014 | 1:13 pm
    The personification of the river Ilissos from the Parthenon© David GillLee Rosenbaum has explored why Nel MacGregor has been keen to make a loan of the 'Ilissos' statue to the Hermitage Museum ("Preparing for Lawsuit? Why Might Neil MacGregor Be Doubling Down on His Elgin Marbles Bet?", Culturegrrl December 9, 2014).Rosenbaum suggests the following as a possible explanation of MacGregor's tactic:More people view these cultural treasures in London than in Athens. And now, with the incipient loan program, the British Museum’s reach could be further broadened. Therefore, the world is better…
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    Stone Pages Archaeo News

  • Mesolithic encampment unearthed near Stonehenge

    20 Dec 2014 | 9:43 am
    Archaeologists working on a site near Stonehenge say they have found an untouched 6,000-year-old encampment. David Jacques, from the University of Buckingham, made the discovery at Blick Mead in October,...
  • Ancient settlement discovered in Georgia

    20 Dec 2014 | 9:42 am
    The satellite images from space have allowed Georgian archaeologists to discover an ancient settlement in Shiraki (Kakheti region, Eastern Georgia). The first phase of archaeological research will be completed in...
  • Submerged Neolithic village found in the Mediterranean

    17 Dec 2014 | 1:21 am
    Sea levels have been rising for tens of thousands of years. Today we have technology to help us combat the effects, but even so, a small increase can have a...
  • Dolmens under threat in India

    17 Dec 2014 | 1:20 am
    Thrissur is currently the third largest populated city in Kerala (India) and is known as the Cultural Capital of the region. Megalithic dolmens were quite prevalent in the area, dating...
  • More ancient rock art found in Southeast Asia

    17 Dec 2014 | 1:19 am
    Back in October 2015 research results were published by Griffith University (Australia) documenting the discovery of rock art in Sulawesi (Indonesia), dated at approximately 35,000 to 40,000 years old. At...
 
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    Archaeology News from Past Horizons

  • We could all be angels

    Past Horizons
    21 Dec 2014 | 10:59 am
    A University of Leicester academic discusses how angels have long been used to reinforce elitism in human society. A 5th century text established ideas about hierarchy that are still taught today. Related posts: No related posts.
  • Sonar maps and images created of steamship lost more than 100 years ago

    Past Horizons
    21 Dec 2014 | 3:38 am
    Three-dimensional sonar maps and images have been released of an immigrant steamship lost more than 100 years ago in what many consider the worst maritime disaster in San Francisco history. Related posts: Lost Maya city of Noh Kah has been mapped New archaeology survey maps Iraqi Kurdistan 4,000 years of activity uncovered in Aberdeenshire Searching for lost English Civil War siegeworks Divers return to wrecksite of the Mary Rose
  • Dental calculus reveals sweet potato as staple food for pre-contact Easter Islanders

    Past Horizons
    20 Dec 2014 | 12:26 pm
    Two researchers have been analysing dental calculus (hardened plaque) from ancient teeth in an attempt to resolve the question of what plant foods Easter Islanders relied on before European contact. Related posts: Studies show early contact between Easter Island and the Americas Ancient dental plaque contains evidence for milk drinking habits Pinpointing early sustained farming on the Tibetan Plateau Domestic cereals in evidence 7,000 years ago in Sudan Old Sarum survey reveals new information about medieval city layout
  • Re-creating 36,000 year-old Chauvet cave art

    Past Horizons
    20 Dec 2014 | 4:15 am
    A replica of Chauvet cave and its pre-historic art will open to the public in April 2015. Related posts: Finding the first artists Possible Neanderthal rock engraving in Gorham’s Cave 3,200 year-old trousers found in Silk Road graves Ten artists painted the Olmeca-Xicalanca Battle mural Antiquity thieves caught at Cave of Skulls searching for Dead Sea artefacts
  • Anchors provide clues to Spanish Vikings

    Past Horizons
    19 Dec 2014 | 1:08 am
    There are written accounts of Viking raids in northern Spain but, archaeologically, absolutely nothing has been done on an academic scale. A University of Aberdeen researcher hopes to rectify this situation. Related posts: New app will provide streetview for Bronze Age city life in Cyprus Figurines provide clue to Olmec trading links in Mexico Documents from Roman Egypt give clues about childhood Major Viking hoard found in Scottish field An invitation to discover the Northern Picts
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    The Archaeology News Network

  • More structures identified at Amphipolis mound

    19 Dec 2014 | 9:00 am
    A geophysical survey was carried out on Kasta Hill, where the mysterious tomb of Amphipolis was discovered, with the results indicating the location of additional man-made structures of archaeological importance. Aerial view of the Kasta Mound at Amphipolis [Credit: To Vima]By using the scanned images, the archaeological team will be able to construct a rudimentary map of the archaological remains hidden within the hill, allowing them... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Stonehenge dig finds 6,000 year old encampment

    19 Dec 2014 | 8:00 am
    The earliest Mesolithic encampment at Stonehenge has been discovered in a University of Buckingham archaeological dig and it will reveal for the first time how Britain’s oldest ancestors lived – but it could be damaged if Government plans for a tunnel at Stonehenge go ahead. Archaeologists found the encampment during a dig at Blick Mead near Stonehenge  [Credit: University of Buckingham/BBC]Charcoal dug up from the encampment, a... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Verona's amphitheatre to be restored

    19 Dec 2014 | 7:00 am
    Verona's famed Roman amphitheater, home to one of the world's premier opera festivals, is one of the first big beneficiaries of a new Italian government initiative to encourage private donations to protect cultural treasures. The project aims to secure the open-air Verona Arena, the third-largest Roman-era  amphitheatre to survive antiquity [Credit: Web]Italian bank Unicredit and the nonprofit foundation CariVerona signed a deal... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Sanctuary of Asclepius in Epidaurus to get a makeover

    18 Dec 2014 | 12:00 pm
    The sanctuary of the God-Physician Asclepius in Epidaurus, southern Greece, is to get a makeover, as part of a project that will be included in National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) funds for 2014-2020. Theatre at Epidaurus [Credit: Protothema]According to Environment, Energy and Climate Change Minister Yiannis Maniatis, the budget for the project amounts to 5,650,000 euros. The purpose of the initiative is to make... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Byzantine skull shows evidence of brain surgery

    18 Dec 2014 | 11:00 am
    The identification of a cut on a skull that was unearthed during the Bathonea excavations, which archaeologists have been conducting in the Küçükçekmece lake basin for the last five years, appears to reveal that brain surgery was performed 1,000 years ago. A skull found in one of the graves reveals a successful brain  operation from Byzantine times [Credit: AA] One of the excavation team members, forensic science expert Ömer... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    The Mathisen Corollary

  • Winter solstice, 2014: the Stable and the Manger

    David Warner Mathisen
    20 Dec 2014 | 4:42 pm
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).The earth will pass through the point of December solstice this year on December 21st at 2303 Greenwich time (now referred to as UTC), which is 1503 Pacific time and 1803 Eastern time for those in North America (numerous sites on the web can help you determine the time at your location if the references above aren't enough to zero-in on it).As has been remarked upon in many other discussions, the word "solstice" descends from a combination of the Latin noun sol ("the sun") with a form of the Latin verb sistere ("to stand"), and thus means "sun-standing," as in…
  • Odysseus and Orion

    David Warner Mathisen
    19 Dec 2014 | 2:08 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).In the Odyssey, the long-suffering Odysseus is told by Circe the lustrous goddess that he must go down to the realm of the dead, to consult the shade of Tiresias in the underworld and learn what he must do in order to return home (Book X: 553 - 595).It should be noted that crossing over to the "other world" in order to obtain knowledge or direction unavailable through any other means can be seen as a definitively shamanic act, and there is no doubt that Odysseus can be seen to be a shamanic figure in many ways throughout the Odyssey.Following the instructions…
  • John the Baptist

    David Warner Mathisen
    17 Dec 2014 | 3:23 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).Caution: this post will examine evidence that the stories in the Biblical scriptures were not intended to be understood literally. Those not comfortable examining such evidence may not wish to read further.As we approach the "lowest point" on the annual wheel of the year, the winter solstice (which is the December solstice, for those in the northern hemisphere), we approach the celebration of Christmas and all the rich symbolism and powerful traditions which surround that special day on which the sun finally stops its "downward journey," pauses, and then turns…
  • The death of Sitting Bull

    David Warner Mathisen
    15 Dec 2014 | 12:35 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).On this day, December 15th, in the year 1890, the Lakota holy man Tatanka Iyotanke -- Sitting Bull -- was killed.He was killed during a surprise pre-dawn arrest at the Standing Rock Agency, where he had been allowed to live after two years of imprisonment following his surrender. Sitting Bull had been one of the last leaders to hold out against being forced to abandon the traditional ways of his people and consent to being forced to live on an agency by the representatives of the government of the US, after the shameful and deceptive violation of treaty…
  • The Heart of Everything That Is

    David Warner Mathisen
    14 Dec 2014 | 3:18 am
    Now is an outstanding time of year to view what is sometimes referred to as the "Winter Circle" of dazzling stars, which includes Sirius (in Canis Major), Procyon (in Canis Minor), Menkalinan and Capella (in Auriga), and the Twins of Castor and Pollux (in Gemini). The Winter Circle was previously discussed in a post from 2011, which you can find here.Now that the moon is declining towards the New Moon of December 22, it will be less and less of a factor in the night sky (it will rise later and later in the "wee hours" of the morning, or closer and closer to dawn, and as it does so it…
 
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    Doug's Archaeology

  • Edinburgh, Lothians and Borders Conference Videos

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    16 Dec 2014 | 1:52 am
    I just finished up editing the videos for the Edinburgh, Lothians and Borders Conference. The sound in the room was horrible so the sound is so-so in some videos. Here are the presentations from that conference. Picture this! Recent archaeological visualisation on Scotland’s national forest estate Dark goings on at Cramond! Hidden history of the Scottish Borders: community archaeology in Glenrath, Peeblesshire. Leith Fort Rediscovered Bringing Eyemouth Fort into the 21st century: co-creation and interpretation. The Princess, the Slave and the Weaver Below the Brewery: Medieval industry in…
  • Launch of Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (CIfA)

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    11 Dec 2014 | 1:37 am
    On Tuesday I was at the launch of the new Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (CIfA) which is going to replace the old Institute for Archaeologists (IfA). Basically, IfA got Chartership. For my non-UK readers ‘Chartership‘ is an official recognition from the Queen. 1000 years ago it meant things like turning villages into cities. Lots of organisations have them in the UK like the BBC and University of Cambridge. Now a largely symbolic gesture it does carry with it lots of prestige. Mainly because of the role government now plays in its governance – once incorporated by…
  • Around the Archaeology Blog-o-sphere Digest #11

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    30 Nov 2014 | 8:30 am
    Another week of blog posts from Archaeology blogs/ blogs that focus on Archaeology. Purpose & Source I am highlighting some of the other archeo-blogs out there by collecting all their posts from the previous week . Hopefully, you find some of the posts interesting and/or find a new blog to follow. I took these posts from my now updated list of archaeology blogs (440+ and counting). Here are this weeks posts– umanprehistory.wordpress.com Novel agro-pastoral package enabled settlement of Tibetan Plateau howardwilliamsblog.wordpress.com Inclined to Material Agency: Death in Leeds…
  • Tay and Fife Archaeology Conference Videos, 2014

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    24 Nov 2014 | 1:32 am
    At the beginning of the month I was at the Tay and Fife Archaeology Conference and was lucky enough to have been asked to film some of the talks. I just got permission to publish the last video so here they all are. In no particular order, other than how they ended up in the playlist on YouTube, are the presentations from the conference: Tayside and Fife, 4000-1500BC: what we know and what we need to find out Sweetly Refined – ceramics from Dundee’s Sugar House Circling the square, re-imagining the Pittentian timber circle Adding a new dimension to Dundee’s carved stones…
  • Around the Archaeology Blog-o-sphere Digest #10

    Doug Rocks-Macqueen
    23 Nov 2014 | 5:31 am
    I have missed the last few weeks of this round-up but now I am back. Here is my weekly list of blog posts from Archaeology blogs/ blogs that focus on Archaeology. Purpose I am highlighting some of the other archeo-blogs out there by collecting all their posts from the previous week . Hopefully, you find some of the posts interesting and/or find a new blog to follow. Source I took these posts from my now updated list of archaeology blogs (440+ and counting). There are a few blogs that should be in this list that are missing — hoping to fix that. Here are this weeks posts–…
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    Cultural Heritage Lawyer Rick St. Hilaire

  • Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Program for Museum Exhibitions: New Budget Law Sets Higher Limits

    18 Dec 2014 | 9:43 pm
    The Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Program received a significant boost from lawmakers on Capitol Hill this week, and museums are sure to take note.Tucked within the 1600 pages of the $1.1 trillion budget bill signed into law on Tuesday is a section that raises the indemnity limits for America's largest art insurance program.Administered by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Program protects temporary museum exhibitions against loss or damage and saves nonprofit cultural institutions $30 million dollars a year in costs they otherwise would have spent on…
  • Cultural Heritage Trafficking Requires Deterrence

    16 Dec 2014 | 7:26 pm
    Police officers are good at tracking down and arresting criminals. Prosecutors are good at securing convictions, even in some of the most complex cases. So why aren't police and prosecutors routinely investigating and prosecuting cultural heritage traffickers?HSI officials returned smuggled cultural artifacts to the Turkish governmentduring a ceremony held last week in New York City. Source: ICELast week Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) repatriated ancient arrowheads, coins, and jewelry to Turkey, which were smuggled into Newark International Airport in February 2013. The objects…
  • Nicaragua and Mali on CPAC's Agenda

    13 Dec 2014 | 8:00 am
    The Federal Register has posted the following announcement:There will be a meeting of the Cultural Property Advisory Committee January 21-23, 2015 at the U.S. Department of State, Annex 5, 2200 C Street NW., Washington, DC. Portions of this meeting will be closed to the public, as discussed below. During the closed portion of the meeting, the Committee will review the proposal to extend the Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Republic of Nicaragua Concerning the Imposition of Import Restrictions on Archaeological Material…
  • Controversial Egyptian Statue Fails to Sell at Sotheby's Auction

    12 Dec 2014 | 1:51 pm
    An Egyptian statute failed to sell at Sotheby's Egyptian, Classical, and Western Asiatic Antiquities auction held today in New York. Valued at over $400,000, bidding for "Lot 6" collapsed at $350,000 and did not reach the reserve price.CHL has been probing the history of the curious piece for several weeks and expects to publish its findings in a future blog post.In the meantime, this week Glasgow researcher Dr. Christos Tsirogiannis found the archaeological artifact listed in the Schinoussa archive. That is the set of photographs seized by Italian authorities in 2006 at the…
  • Dinosaur Skull Forfeited by Federal Judge in Eastern District of NY

    3 Dec 2014 | 5:58 pm
    Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch wrapped up another cultural property case yesterday. The matter of U.S. v. One Alioramus Dinosaur Skull came to a conclusion after a federal district court judge in Brooklyn ordered the dinosaur head's forfeiture.No claimants appeared in court to oppose the civil forfeiture, even though French dealer Gefossiles, Inc. once tried to convince American authorities that all was proper with the company's dinosaur shipment. U.S. Customs seized the dinosaur skull in Newark, New Jersey in 2004.The U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of…
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    The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty

  • Episode 20 “What’s Next?”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    2 Dec 2014 | 4:40 am
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back! It’s Episode 20 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty, “What’s Next?” So, I thought I’d catch you up on recent events relating to grad school and my career(Spoiler: I’m graduating, yay me!). That turned into the perfect opportunity for me to dispense some sagely advice about going out into the job market and figuring out what to do after school. If you’re looking for some great sources to look for jobs or learn about how to get jobs, I suggest you check out some of the sources I listed in…
  • Episode 19 “Caen you handle this? It’s France, part Deux!”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    2 Oct 2014 | 11:50 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back to The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty! This is episode 19 of the podcast “Caen you handle this? It’s France, part Deux!” In this, the second installment of Jenny’s French adventures, we talk about my time in Paris and the Normandy region. Some of the things I waxed on about in this episode include: What’s up with city planning and historical relevance in Paris? Saint Denis Paris? Really? His name is Denis… Jenny’s movie recommendation for the month: Midnight in Paris Guess the obscure musical…
  • Béarnaise Awesome-Sauce

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:17 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Bonjour mes amis! Et bienvenue to episode 18 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty, “Béarnaise Awesome-Sauce!” You may have noticed that I’ve been gone for the last three weeks (yeah, sorry about that), well it’s because I’ve been in France! So I thought now that I’ve returned to my native soil I would tell you all about my travels and the fun and fascinating things I learned while exploring the beautiful land of baguettes, burgundy, and béarnaise sauce! This will be a two-part series because there’s…
  • Episode 17 “Great Odin’s Raven- it’s Archaeology 101!

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    5 Jul 2014 | 5:48 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Hi friends, welcome to Episode 17 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty Podcast “Great Odin’s Raven-it’s Archaeology 101!” In this fun filled episode we tackle some of the basics of excavation, with a focus on why archaeology and geology are old friends- and how this makes us better at what we do. It’s like taking that Archaeology 101 class you never got around to in college! (Unless you actually did take that class, then it’s more of a review of things you probably already know…sorry). In this new…
  • Episode 16 “Go West, Young (Wo)Man!”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    13 Jun 2014 | 2:26 am
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back friends! It’s another fantabulous episode of basically the best podcast that ever lived, “The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty!” So perhaps you noticed that I disappeared from the interwebs all of last week, that’s because I was working outside the reach of modern technology (and air conditioning). I had a fun week camping and surveying in the Zuni Mountains of New Mexico, which sounded like a pretty good topic for this week’s episode. We discuss the history of pioneering logging efforts in this area, as…
 
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    AntiquityNOW

  • 2014 Recipes With a Past and the Art of Being Human

    AntiquityNOW
    18 Dec 2014 | 2:00 am
    AntiquityNOW is pleased to announce the launch of the 2014 Recipes With a Past, a compendium of dishes derived from our weekly Bon Appetit Wednesday! blog posts.  Embracing more than 25 countries and cuisines, this e-book has two new designations … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! Celebrating a Sephardic Hanukkah with Sfenj

    AntiquityNOW
    17 Dec 2014 | 2:00 am
    In our Bon Appetit Wednesday! post for Rosh Hashanah this year we told you about the ways in which recipes and traditions for the Jewish New Year have been influenced heavily by the cultures in which they are celebrated. A … Continue reading →
  • Buildings of the Future With Foundations in the Ancient Past

    AntiquityNOW
    16 Dec 2014 | 2:00 am
    The winter solstice is on this coming Sunday and even though it was the first day of winter, much of the United States has been enjoying some of the warmest temperatures on record (click here to read more about the … Continue reading →
  • The Middle East Outreach Council Announces 2014 Middle East Book Awards

    AntiquityNOW
    12 Dec 2014 | 2:00 am
    Below find a press release from the Middle East Outreach Council announcing the Middle East Book Awards. Our president, Shirley Gazsi, had the honor of serving on the judging committee. These creative, moving, educational books can be found on our … Continue reading →
  • Looking Back on the Winners of LegacyQuest 2014 and Looking Forward to LegacyQuest 2015

    AntiquityNOW
    11 Dec 2014 | 2:00 am
    Letter of Intent Deadline- December 12, 2014 (Please contact us at info@antiquitynow.org if you need an extension) Final Entry Submission Deadline- February 27, 2015 There’s still plenty of time before final video submissions on February 27. Contact us at info@antiquitynow.org if … Continue reading →
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    Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica

  • Audio News for December 7 to 13, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    15 Dec 2014 | 4:01 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Evidence of building foundations marks early Japanese capital (details) Danish Bronze Age beads originated in Egypt (details) Carved rock depicts legend from Pacific Northwest Coast (details) New finds in excavations at Luxor (details)
  • Audio News for November 30 to December 6, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    8 Dec 2014 | 5:57 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Booze and good food fueled Icelandic Viking politics (details) Forgotten medieval palace at Old Sarum emerges from beneath an Iron Age fortress (details) Rediscovered mussel shell from Java may indicate a 500,000-year old work of art (details) DNA analysis of Richard III confirm his identity, but raise some interesting historical questions (details)
  • Audio News for November 23 to 29, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    1 Dec 2014 | 5:20 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Evidence of "vampire" burials rises up from Polish cemetery (details) Intricately carved Silk Road tombs reveal signs of an early zodiac (details) Danish archaeologists find a Stone Age axe with its wooden handle (details) Excavations at Hatfield-McCoy sites in West Virginia and Kentucky yield exciting finds (details)
  • Audio News for November 16 to 22, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    24 Nov 2014 | 4:59 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Early high altitude farm sites studied on the Tibetan Plateau (details) Sunken town found off Greek island of Delos (details) New investigations shed light on Utah's ancient Promontory Culture (details) Italian team explores ancient ruins at Turkish border site within sight of modern war (details)
  • Audio News for November 9 to November 15, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    17 Nov 2014 | 9:03 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Twin infant burials from a Paleoindian site in Alaska (details) Glass dish from 5th-century Japanese tomb has 2nd-century Roman origins (details) Tomb of a Han Chinese elite holds elaborate mural and poetry (details) Modern technology explains the ancient technology of China’s terra-cotta army (details)
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