Archaeology

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  • The Happy Accidents of Archaeological Drone Photography

    Middle Savagery
    colleenmorgan
    14 Nov 2014 | 1:29 am
    Admittedly, 80% of the 227 photos are of grass. Blurry, impressionistic, green. The camera was set to time lapse, taking a photo every five seconds, and most people in the Heritage & Play group had a turn. A new person at the controls, and the angry-bee-buzz of the small white drone would signal lift-off. We all stood around it, watching it aloft, buzz around, then land. We were amateurs–this is not an effective group shot, but it’s lovely. It’s late autumn in England, the sun hangs low in the sky, prolonging the golden hour and lighting up the still-green fields.
  • Sun-watch at Garbeg: A Conjecture

    NOSAS Archaeology Blog
    nosas
    12 Jan 2015 | 1:54 pm
    A look at how a prehistoric agricultural community in the Scottish Highlands could have made sophisticated use of the sun.    by David Robinson (NOSAS) On a remote expanse of high ground, roughly 2 kilometres north of Drumnadrochit in the Highlands of Scotland, sits the extensive series of prehistoric archaeological features known as Garbeg. The records of the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historic Monuments contain detailed references to these features (see appendix), which include hut circles and field system, hut circle groups and a Pictish Barrow cemetery. There are also other…
  • Archaeology expert to give talk in Lickey

    archaeology - Yahoo News Search Results
    28 Jan 2015 | 5:14 pm
    AN ILLUSTRATTED talk on Archaeology and the Natural Environment will be given by Dr Mike Hodder at The Trinity Centre, formerly Lickey Parish Hall. The event, organised by the Lickey Hills Society, will be held at 7.30pm on Tuesday (January 27).
  • Skull Is Possible Link For Neanderthals & Modern Humans

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine
    28 Jan 2015 | 2:31 pm
    TEL AVIV, ISRAEL—A 55,000-year-old partial modern human skull has been discovered in Israel’s Manot Cave, making it the first fossil evidence that Homo sapiens were in the region and available to mate with Neanderthals, as recent genetic studies suggest. Neanderthal fossils have been found in caves in Israel and other parts of the Middle East as late as 49,000 years ago, but modern human remains had only been found to date between 120,000 and 80,000 years ago. The new skull was found covered with a thin layer of calcite on a ledge in the cave, so the research team, led by Israel…
  • Long-necked 'dragon' discovered in China: Dinosaur's lightweight neck spanned half the length of its body

    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily
    28 Jan 2015 | 1:05 pm
    Paleontologists have discovered a new species of a long-necked dinosaur from a skeleton found in China. The new species belongs to a group of dinosaurs called mamenchisaurids, known for their extremely long necks sometimes measuring up to half the length of their bodies. Most sauropods, or long-necked dinosaurs, have necks only about one third the length of their bodies.
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    archaeology - Yahoo News Search Results

  • Archaeology expert to give talk in Lickey

    28 Jan 2015 | 5:14 pm
    AN ILLUSTRATTED talk on Archaeology and the Natural Environment will be given by Dr Mike Hodder at The Trinity Centre, formerly Lickey Parish Hall. The event, organised by the Lickey Hills Society, will be held at 7.30pm on Tuesday (January 27).
  • Quick links to other pages on this site | Still can't find it? see Site Index

    28 Jan 2015 | 11:12 am
    Connecticut's State Archaeologist, Brian Jones, does a quick sketch during last summerís Adult Archaeology Field School run by the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History.
  • Jacobus Vanderveer House and Somerset Hills YMCA to offer summer archaeology camp

    27 Jan 2015 | 7:15 pm
    This summer, Bedminster’s historic Jacobus Vanderveer House is collaborating with the Somerset Hills YMCA to offer a two-week camp focused on archaeology from July 20-31.
  • Lecture on Levens

    26 Jan 2015 | 9:38 am
    JULIAN Munby, Head of Buildings Archaeology at Oxford Archaeology South, will address a meeting of the Levens Local History Group in the village institute on Thursday February 19, starting at 7.30pm. He first visited Levens to dig in the park in the 1960s and has written a history of the park and gardens. He will talk on the subject 'Levens and the Park: Discoveries in the Deed Room and beyond."
  • Education loan boxes available for free

    26 Jan 2015 | 3:48 am
    A new series of education loan boxes, covering eras from prehistory to the early medieval period, is being made available free of charge to schools and youth groups by Northumberland National Park Community Archaeology.
 
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    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine

  • Skull Is Possible Link For Neanderthals & Modern Humans

    28 Jan 2015 | 2:31 pm
    TEL AVIV, ISRAEL—A 55,000-year-old partial modern human skull has been discovered in Israel’s Manot Cave, making it the first fossil evidence that Homo sapiens were in the region and available to mate with Neanderthals, as recent genetic studies suggest. Neanderthal fossils have been found in caves in Israel and other parts of the Middle East as late as 49,000 years ago, but modern human remains had only been found to date between 120,000 and 80,000 years ago. The new skull was found covered with a thin layer of calcite on a ledge in the cave, so the research team, led by Israel…
  • Evidence Shows Paleo-Indians Used Spear Throwers

    28 Jan 2015 | 2:00 pm
    KAMLOOPS, BRITISH COLUMBIA—Karl Hutchings of Thompson Rivers University measured the fractures in hundreds of spear points crafted by the peoples of the Clovis and Folsom cultures and found that some of these weapon tips, made by the earliest-known North Americans, had been subjected to high-velocity, mechanically propelled impacts. This suggests that Paleo-Indians used atlatls, or spear-throwers, for hunting mammoths and other big game. When the point hit the target, the energy of the impact caused the tip to break. “When it breaks, it sends a shock wave through the stone that produces…
  • Maya Water Temple Discovered in Belize

    28 Jan 2015 | 1:31 pm
    CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS—A water temple complex where archaeologists think a “drought cult” offered sacrifices has been discovered at the Cara Blanca site in Belize. A lodge and two smaller structures had been built near a deep cenote, where the Maya placed pots, jars, and bowls and may have prayed for rain. The water temple had been built from the cenote’s tufa stone, and its floors had been covered with broken water jars, teeth, and claws dredged from the sacred pool. “The pilgrims came there to purify themselves and to make offerings,” Lisa Lucero of the University of Illinois told…
  • Archaic Jawbone Could Represent New Hominin Species

    28 Jan 2015 | 1:00 pm
    TOKYO, JAPAN—A robust jawbone pulled from a fisherman’s net in the Penghu Channel, off the coast of Taiwan, has been dated to between 10,000 and 190,000 years old by a team of scientists from Taiwan, Japan, and Australia, who published their findings in the journal Nature Communications. They compared the levels of fluorine and sodium in the fossil and other animal bones recovered from the same region, which was once a part of the Asian mainland when water levels were lower, to date the jawbone. The four-inch-long fossil still has four teeth attached, including two large molars, which…
  • Ancient Column Capital Unearthed in Cyprus

    27 Jan 2015 | 2:30 pm
    FAMAGUSTA, CYPRUS—The Famagusta Gazette reports that the top of an ancient column has been uncovered by construction workers at Ayia Thekla church on the eastern coast of Cyprus. The capital was reburied and the antiquities department was notified. Excavations are now being planned for the area around the church, which is being restored. It has been thought that ancient quarries may have been located near the site of the church. To read more about archaeology on the island, see "Bronze Age City Unearthed in Cyprus."
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    Archaeology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Long-necked 'dragon' discovered in China: Dinosaur's lightweight neck spanned half the length of its body

    28 Jan 2015 | 1:05 pm
    Paleontologists have discovered a new species of a long-necked dinosaur from a skeleton found in China. The new species belongs to a group of dinosaurs called mamenchisaurids, known for their extremely long necks sometimes measuring up to half the length of their bodies. Most sauropods, or long-necked dinosaurs, have necks only about one third the length of their bodies.
  • Anthropology: Ancient skull from Galilee cave offers clues to the first modern Europeans

    28 Jan 2015 | 10:13 am
    The discovery of a 55,000-year-old partial skull in Northern Israel provides new insights into the migration of modern humans out of Africa. A key event in human evolution was the expansion of modern humans of African origin across Eurasia, replacing all other forms of hominin (humans and their predecessors), around 40,000-60,000 years ago. However, due to the scarcity of human fossils from this period, these ancestors of all present-day non-African modern populations have largely remained a mystery. Now, researchers describe a partial skull that dates to around 55,000, which was found at…
  • Antiquity of dairying on Emerald Isle revealed

    16 Jan 2015 | 7:44 am
    The antiquity of dairy farming in Ireland has been outlined by researchers in a new report. The research shows that dairying on the island goes back approximately 6,000 years, revealed through traces of ancient dairy fats found in pots dating to around 4,000 to 2,500 BC.
  • Out of the pouch: Ancient DNA extracted from extinct giant kangaroos

    15 Jan 2015 | 6:18 am
    Scientists have finally managed to extract DNA from Australia's extinct giant kangaroos, the mysterious marsupial megafauna that roamed Australia over 40,000 years ago. They have extracted DNA sequences from two species: a giant short-faced kangaroo (Simosthenurus occidentalis) and a giant wallaby (Protemnodon anak).
  • Two-faced fish clue that our ancestors 'weren't shark-like'

    12 Jan 2015 | 10:55 am
    An investigation of a 415-million-year-old fish skull strongly suggests that the last common ancestor of all jawed vertebrates, including humans, was not very shark-like. It adds further weight to the growing idea that sharks are not 'primitive.'
 
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    Everyone's Blog Posts - ArchaeoSeek

  • Strata: Portraits of Humanity features Roman soldier’s tombstone and more

    Rick Pettigrew
    15 Jan 2015 | 11:56 am
    Friends and colleagues: You can see three fascinating features in the January 2015 edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV: * In a short animated film, a small boy discovers an ancient grave by accident and witnesses its looting and destruction. * After 3 years soaking in a tank filled with a preservative solution, the 1,100 year old Native American dugout canoe excavated in 2011 from Florida’s Weedon Island Preserve has taken a big step closer to going on public display. * A Roman soldier’s gravestone excavated in 2003 inspires young UK cadets to design a…
  • ALI seeks match for a $10,000 gift

    Rick Pettigrew
    14 Jan 2015 | 10:09 am
    Please spread this word as widely as you can.  ALI produces The Archaeology Channel as well as ArchaeoSeek and much more. An anonymous donor at the beginning of 2015 contributed $10,000 to ALI to support our public outreach efforts and cultural heritage programming. This donor is willing to continue making such contributions, but only if we can raise matching funds to increase our level of basic cash support. If we can raise $10,000 in new contributions (meaning donations, Membership contributions or Underwriting contributions from new sources or in increased amounts from existing sources)…
  • Visit Turkey and see a Florida shipwreck on Strata: Portraits of Humanity

    Rick Pettigrew
    16 Dec 2014 | 9:05 am
    Friends and colleagues: Take a tour of Turkey’s Anatolia region and inspect a Florida shipwreck in the December edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV. In this episode we highlight eastern and southeastern Anatolia in Turkey,which has great scenic beauty and is an archaeological wonderland with clear traces of many civilizations. It includes Mt. Nimrud, with a massive burial mound and monumental statues placed at the summit 2000 years ago. Also this time, we see the 2011 excavations on the English China Shipwreck in Biscayne National Park, Florida, where the…
  • Descend into Roman mines in Spain on Strata: Portraits of Humanity

    Rick Pettigrew
    17 Nov 2014 | 11:24 am
    Friends and colleagues: Descend into Roman mines in northern Spain in the November edition of Strata: Portraits of Humanity, available online and on TV.In this episode we present “Metalla Oiassonis,” a film from Felix Ugarte Elkartea of Spain introducing us to the complex world of the ancient mining that the Romans developed at the ancient port city of Oiasso, located within the modern city today named Irun in Spanish and Gipuzkoa in Basque, in Spain near the French border.  In the western foothills of the Pyrenees and the next to the Bay of Biscay stands the granite massif called Aiako…
  • TOC & CFP, J. African Diaspora Archaeology & Heritage

    Christopher Fennell
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:41 am
    Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and HeritageVolume 3, No. 2, November 2014   This issue is now available online at:http://www.maneyonline.com/toc/jaf/3/2?ai=yo&ui=1yc&af=T ; Table of Contents Weaving the Second Skin: Protection Against Evil Among the Valongo Slaves in Nineteenth-century Rio de JaneiroBy Tania Andrade Lima Marcos André Torres de Souza Glaucia Malerba SeneJ. of African Diaspora Archaeology & Heritage, Vol. 3, No. 2: 103-136.http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/2161944114Z.00000000015?ai=yo&ui=1yc&af=T ; Toys with Professions: Racialized…
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    SEAArch - The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog

  • Call for Papers: The Archaeology of Portable Art: South East Asian, Pacific, and Australian Perspectives

    noelbynature
    28 Jan 2015 | 4:05 pm
    My alma mater is holding a symposium in May on portable art, focusing on Southeast Asia, the Pacific and Australian regions. Paper proposals are now being accepted and you are encouraged to contact Duncan Wright or Michelle Langley for more details. The Archaeology of Portable Art: South East Asian, Pacific, and Australian Perspectives Date: 23-24 May 2015 Venue: The Australian National University This symposium aims to reignite the dialogue about portable art across Island South East Asia, the Pacific and Australia and by doing so review future directions for research. Specific themes are:…
  • Belitung Shipwreck shows up in Canada as the Lost Dhow

    noelbynature
    27 Jan 2015 | 5:29 pm
    Remember the Belitung Shipwreck, whose finds were controversially recovered by commercial salvage operators and then sold to the Singapore Tourism Board? Whose planned exhibition at the Smithsonian was cancelled after an uproar over the circumstances the finds were recovered? The finds are now on display at the Aga Khan Museum in Toronto, Canada. As a museum showcasing the Islamic arts, the exhibition is packaged as the ‘Lost Dhow’, while previous exhibitions have been marketed as treasures from the Tang Dynasty. The Lost Dhow exhibition at the Aga Khan Museum. Source: Living…
  • Phu Phra Bat Historical Park to be nominated for world heritage

    noelbynature
    27 Jan 2015 | 5:07 pm
    Phu Phra Bat Historical Park in Udon Thani Province Thailand is to be nominated at Thailand’s next World Heritage site. This ridge in northeast Thailand is reminiscent of Cambodia’s Phnom Kulen, and contains a long history of human occupation from prehistoric rock paintings, to remains of Dvaravati, Lopburi/Khmer and recently Lan Xang cultures. It is a beautiful landscape and I was really fortunate to have investigated some of the sites there as part of my PhD research. U-sa’s Tower in Phu Phra Bat Historical Park. Source: The Nation, 20150127 Phu Phra Bat Park nominated for…
  • Photoshoot featuring topless woman in Angkorian temple raises uproar

    noelbynature
    27 Jan 2015 | 4:53 pm
    Photos of a topless woman posing in an Angkorian temple appeared in the internet over the weekend, drawing many protests and comments about propriety in what are essentially religious sites. The creators of the photos are thought to be a group based in China, although the specific parties have not been identified. Topless woman at Banteay Kdei. Source: Phnom Penh Post 20150126 Nude photos draw Apsara Authority’s ire Phnom Penh Post, 26 January 2015 Apsara Authority Slams ‘Pornographic’ Photos Cambodia Daily, 26 January 2015 Hindus Upset At Pornographic Filming At Angkor Updated…
  • Indian mystic claims Angkoran temples made in India, and then shipped to Cambodia

    noelbynature
    27 Jan 2015 | 4:35 pm
    A prominent Indian mystic has made some eyebrow-raising (read: ridiculous and laughably incorrect) claims that Angkorian temples were built thousands of years ago in India before being shipped to Cambodia. Indian mystic Nithyananda Sangha. Source: Phnom Penh Post 20150124 Mystic claims Angkorian temples built in India Phnom Penh Post, 24 January 2015 Nithyananda Sangha posted a series of YouTube videos making the assertion shortly before hosting workshops in Siem Reap A prominent Indian mystic who claims some 10 million followers has argued in a series of YouTube videos that the earliest…
 
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    Middle Savagery

  • The Other Photography of Archaeology

    colleenmorgan
    26 Jan 2015 | 8:48 am
    January has been full on, with three talks (including a keynote!) in three countries and a fourth one next week. Two of them involve representation in archaeology and I was reminded to finally get my Nostalgic, Personal, Neglected, Treasured, Rejected: The Other Photography in Archaeology made into an e-book! Click here for the low-quality pdf Click here for the link to the high-quality FREE blurb book Here is the original abstract for the Berkeley TAG piece in 2011: Our view of the past is hazy, inaccurate, hard to discern, never quite all there. Yet our record of such uncertainty is…
  • The Happy Accidents of Archaeological Drone Photography

    colleenmorgan
    14 Nov 2014 | 1:29 am
    Admittedly, 80% of the 227 photos are of grass. Blurry, impressionistic, green. The camera was set to time lapse, taking a photo every five seconds, and most people in the Heritage & Play group had a turn. A new person at the controls, and the angry-bee-buzz of the small white drone would signal lift-off. We all stood around it, watching it aloft, buzz around, then land. We were amateurs–this is not an effective group shot, but it’s lovely. It’s late autumn in England, the sun hangs low in the sky, prolonging the golden hour and lighting up the still-green fields.
  • Who Digs? Craft & Non-specialist labor in archaeology

    colleenmorgan
    9 Oct 2014 | 11:24 am
    Dan and I wrote a short polemic for Bill Caraher’s series on Craft and Archaeology. It was a hydra of a piece to write–we wanted to be succinct and direct, but it kept spiraling out of control. We obviously have a lot more to say on the subject, here’s a short excerpt: Digging is the most evocative archaeological practice, yet it is the most undervalued mode of archaeological knowledge production, least cultivated skill with fewest monetary rewards, and is considered so inconsequential that non-specialist labor is regularly employed to uncover our most critical data sets.
  • Book Review: Archaeographies

    colleenmorgan
    8 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Real Estate Open House, by Fotis Ifantidis My review of Fotis Ifantidis’ Archaeographies came out in the Journal of Contemporary Archaeology. I’m not sure why there aren’t figures, but oh well. A quote from the review: Out of the thousands of photographs taken at Dispilio, Ifantidis has selected examples that are, on the surface, aggressively non-archaeological. These photographs do not effectively document the archaeological record in a way that is acceptable as standard site photography: scales, when deployed, are haphazard, artifacts are scattered and in partial focus,…
  • 50 Years of Visualization at Çatalhöyük

    colleenmorgan
    7 Oct 2014 | 9:14 am
    As I previously mentioned, Jason Quinlan and I co-presented a poster at this year’s EAA in Istanbul. While it isn’t quite as brilliant as Alison Akins’ Plague Poster, I enjoyed putting something together about the photography at Çatalhöyük, especially with one of the primary photographers involved! Regardless, I’ve put our poster below. Of particular note is the immense increase in the size of the archive after Photoscan was introduced at Çatalhöyük. Jason and I collaborated on this remotely, and so there is some funny bits with converting between iterations of…
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    Looting Matters

  • Becchina and Japan

    David Gill
    28 Jan 2015 | 1:30 am
    In 2011 Fabio Isman reminded us of the likely impact of the Becchina archive. Palladion Antike Kunst handled material now in collections in Japan. These include:Kamakura, Japanese collection. Attic black-figured amphora. Perhaps attributed to the Antimenes painter. Palladion (1976).Kurashiki Ninagawa Museum (no. 34). Attic red-figured cup attributed to Makron. Palladion (1976).This excludes material in the Miho Museum.
  • Becchina and Madrid

    David Gill
    27 Jan 2015 | 2:54 am
    Detail of orientalizing amphora in MadridSource: Madrid, Museo ArqueologicoOne of the museums that has not yet responded to the identifications in its collection is the Museo Arqueologico in Madrid [see earlier links]. The material has been discussed by Fabio Isman in The Art Newspaper and there he notes:Becchina’s archive contains photographs of both sides of an Oriental-style Italic Amphora with a Wounded Deer from the seventh century BC, height 52cm, whose dimensions are clearly important enough to note down. The Madrid catalogue, showing a similar object, says of its provenance that…
  • The Basel paperwork will be raising further issues

    David Gill
    26 Jan 2015 | 3:05 pm
    The 5000 or so antiquities revealed in Rome as a result of "Operation Teseo" were the stock of a Basel gallery. But the photographic dossier from the same source point to a series of major international museums that were buying from the same source. For now we can list the countries:USASpainHollandEnglandJapanIt is likely that more details will emerge over the next few weeks. | |
  • Bettany Hughes on the Sappho Papyrus

    David Gill
    24 Jan 2015 | 3:03 pm
    I have had the privilege of seeing the new #Sappho poems but was sworn to secrecy!— Bettany Hughes (@bettanyhughes) January 30, 2014At the end of January 2014 Bettany Hughes commented that she had seen the new Sappho papyrus fragments. This was in preparation for her Sunday Times article that appeared on 2 February. In that piece it was claimed:The elderly owner of our new Sappho papyrus wishes to remain anonymous, and its provenance is obscure (it was originally owned, it seems, by a high-ranking German officer), but he was determined its secrets should not die with him.Yet now Dirk Obbink…
  • 'Fragments in time': reflecting on the Bothmer collection

    David Gill
    23 Jan 2015 | 5:50 am
    Christos Tsirogiannis and I have published "“A Fracture in Time”: A Cup Attributed to the Euaion Painter from the Bothmer Collection" that is now available in the latest number of the International Journal of Cultural Property 21, 4 (2014) [DOI]. IJCP is published by Cambridge University Press.The paper considers the issue of "orphaned" figure-decorated pottery fragments.AbstractIn February 2013 Christos Tsirogiannis linked a fragmentary Athenian red-figured cup from the collection formed by Dietrich von Bothmer, former chairman of Greek and Roman Art at New York’s Metropolitan Museum…
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    Theoretical Structural Archaeology

  • The Northern Frontier; lilies, Latin, and illiteracy

    Geoff Carter
    20 Jan 2015 | 12:52 pm
    Some readers, new to archaeology, particularly students like those on MOOC courses, discover that the evidence based arguments about Roman Military archaeology found on this blog , are not well received by their tutors.  It is important to understand that many academics can only understand archaeology when it is written down, having no experience of real archaeological interpretation. As a result, the text of an archaeological report, rather than the evidence can become an article of faith, and ideas become embedded at a fundamental level, immovable objects, that actual…
  • De-turfing Hadrian’s Wall

    Geoff Carter
    28 Dec 2014 | 12:35 pm
    I have argued the postholes found on the berm of Hadrian’s Wall are the remains of the a timber rampart, which together with theTurf Wall, formed the primary rampart and ditch phase of the frontier.[here] Recent work by Eric Graafstal also suggests the turf wall was the very first part of Hadrian’s Wall, and would date this phase to 119 AD, although the author believes that the Turf Wall was built in isolation against the tribes in SW Scotland [1].  Unfortunately, this leaves the Turf Wall dangling, awaiting the eventual arrival of the Stone Wall in centre of the country, and also…
  • Did the Scots Burn Roman London?

    Geoff Carter
    4 Nov 2014 | 4:07 pm
    At some point in the mid 120’s much of London Burnt  to the ground, around the same time construction of Hadrian’s Wall was apparently abandoned, could these events be connected - just how bad crisis in Roman Britain?“... under the rule of your grandfather Hadrian what a number of soldiers were killed by the Jews, what a number by the Britons”Marcus Cornelius Fronto, letter to Marcus Aurelius, AD162 It should be said at the outset, the use of the term “Scots” is generic for the people who still controlled the upper third of the island, and when Hadrian visited Britain…
  • Posthole Archaeology; Function, Form and Fighting

    Geoff Carter
    26 Oct 2014 | 1:19 pm
    In the previous post I posed the question what buildings does a moderately complex hierarchical agricultural society require, looking at aspects of agricultural buildings; this time I am looking at moderately complex hierarchical society, or at least that end of hierarchy that tends to represented in archaeology.It is fashionable, and perhaps progressive, to talk of higher status individuals or elites, to avoid cultural bias inherent such terms as aristocracy.   However, I use the term in its original cultural context precisely to reference that bias, or understanding, and…
  • Posthole archaeology; function, form and farming

    Geoff Carter
    25 Sep 2014 | 6:18 pm
    By the Bronze Age in British Isles, and certainly in terms of the proto-historic Late Iron Age, we have what historians might call petty kings and aristocracy, sometimes with a more wider regional and national institutions.  Although our museums have their weapons and treasures, architecturally, we have lost sight of the petty king in his palace and the homes of the aristocracy, always such a feature of our countryside.  But this is just the tip of an iceberg of ignorance, since we know very little of the charcoal burner in his hut, and have no real notion of cart sheds or byres;…
 
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    Archaeology News from Past Horizons

  • 55,000 year old skull in Galilee cave connects Africa to Europe

    Past Horizons
    28 Jan 2015 | 12:37 pm
    The discovery of a 55,000-year-old partial skull in Northern Israel provides new insights into the migration of modern humans out of Africa. Related posts: 43,500 year old modern human presence in Europe Genome sequence of 45,000 year-old Siberian DNA from 36,000 year-old European hunter gatherer shows deep shared ancestry Neolithic farmers came to Europe by sea route Stone artefacts from 700,000 year old South African site
  • Obsidian artefacts help researchers understand historic land use on Easter Island

    Past Horizons
    28 Jan 2015 | 6:52 am
    A new study by a group of international researchers, offers a different explanation as to the decline of Easter Island society, and helps to clarify the chronological framework. Related posts: Studies show early contact between Easter Island and the Americas Dental calculus reveals sweet potato as staple food for pre-contact Easter Islanders Analysing Jawoyn rock-art in Arnhem Land Understanding historic use of the Amazon Basin Latest research further discredits cosmic impact theory
  • An innovative method of documenting shipwrecks

    Past Horizons
    27 Jan 2015 | 7:57 am
    Three shipwrecks lying in the Gulf of Gdańsk have been documented in 3D. This innovative method allows underwater archaeologists to work effectively even with minimal visibility. Related posts: Sonar maps and images created of steamship lost more than 100 years ago The Man Who Thought Like a Ship Divers return to wrecksite of the Mary Rose Mesolithic shamanistic meteorite talisman unearthed 2,000 year-old Antikythera ship much larger than previously thought
  • More tattoos discovered on Oetzi

    Past Horizons
    27 Jan 2015 | 6:28 am
    With the aid of a non-invasive photographic technique, researchers have been able to show up all the tattoos on the iceman's body, including a new one on his ribcage. The technology has now enabled tattoos in deeper skin layers to be identified as well. Related posts: Pre-Neanderthal remains discovered at Normandy site Bronze Age palace discovered in southern Spain 6,500 Ur skeleton re-discovered in museum collection A look inside the charred scrolls of Herculaneum 1,300 year-old wooden ski discovered in Norway
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Assyrian soldiers

    Past Horizons
    26 Jan 2015 | 10:59 am
    Researchers have uncovered evidence from Mesopotamian literature, of Assyrian dynasty (1300–609 BC) soldiers suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Related posts: Deadly injuries to skull and pelvis of Richard III revealed The Assyrian city of Tushhan: a race against time 11,500 year-old infant double burial unearthed in Alaska Four decades of violence in 12th century Mesa Verde Dental calculus reveals sweet potato as staple food for pre-contact Easter Islanders
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    The Archaeology News Network

  • Ancient skull from Galilee cave offers clues to the first modern Europeans

    28 Jan 2015 | 9:00 am
    The discovery of a 55,000-year-old partial skull in Northern Israel provides new insights into the migration of modern humans out of Africa. The rare find is reported in the journal Nature this week by an international team of Israeli, North American and European researchers. The interior of the Manot Cave in Israel's Galilee, where a 55,000-year-old skull  sheds new light on modern human migration patterns [Credit: Amos... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Two Harappan sites being excavated

    28 Jan 2015 | 8:00 am
    Excavations have begun at the two Harappan sites of Binjor in Rajasthan, close to the India-Pakistan border, and Rakhigarhi in Haryana. The granary at the Harappan site of Rakhigarhi in Haryana  [Credit: The Hindu]While the Archaeological Survey of India’s Excavation Branch at Purana Quila, New Delhi, is excavating Binjor, the Deccan College Post-Graduate & Research Institute, Pune, and the Haryana Department of Archaeology... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Large Roman necropolis in Poland to be studied

    28 Jan 2015 | 7:00 am
    The largest necropolis from the Roman period in Karczyn in Kujawy is the object of detailed scientific research. Funds received from the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage will allow to complete the analyses, that will determine the diet, kinship and origin of the dead buried in the cemetery. Tomb of a warrior [Credit: Adriana Romańska]Excavations in Karczyn were conducted in 2002-2010 by the Archaeological Expedition of the... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Ancient human fossil from Taiwan could be new primitive species

    28 Jan 2015 | 5:30 am
    An ancient human fossil discovered from the seafloor near Taiwan reveals that a primitive group of humans, potentially an unknown species, once lived in Asia, researchers say. This fossilized lower jaw was recovered from the seafloor near Taiwain. Researchers  say the fossil, dubbed Penghu 1, may be a primitive type of hominin that has  been unrecognized so far in the Pleistocene Asian fossil record  [Credit: Y.... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • More on Easter Island collapse more complex than thought

    27 Jan 2015 | 10:00 am
    Long before the Europeans arrived on Easter Island in 1722, the native Polynesian culture known as Rapa Nui showed signs of demographic decline. However, the catalyst has long been debated in the scientific community. Was environmental degradation the cause, or could a political revolution or an epidemic of disease be to blame? Monolithic human figures called moai were carved from rock between 1250 and 1500  by the inhabitants of... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
 
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    The Mathisen Corollary

  • The vision of Ezekiel and the Tetramorphs of the Four Gospels

    David Warner Mathisen
    26 Jan 2015 | 3:01 am
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).Many present-day readers of the New Testament, particularly those from Protestant traditions, may be unaware of the very ancient association of the four New Testament gospel books with four specific figures: that of a winged Man, that of a winged Lion, that of a winged Bull or Ox, and that of an Eagle (winged, of course).Robert Taylor (1784 - 1844), an ordained minister in England in the early 1800s, was sentenced to three years behind bars and was defrocked for the offense of giving "astronomico-theological lectures" in which he explained the celestial…
  • A visit to Grimerica

    David Warner Mathisen
    23 Jan 2015 | 11:35 pm
    Big thank you to Grimericans Graham Dunlop and Darren Grimes for inviting me over to "The Igloo" to discuss ancient myth, celestial mechanics, world mysteries, and the shamanic-holographic nature of the universe and human existence (here's a link to the page where you can listen or download -- the guys are doing great work there so please support their "value-for-value" model if and when you are able to do so -- and tell a friend about it).Welcome to new visitors from the unique land of Grimerica, as well as to all returning friends here to this blog -- really hope you enjoy the conversation…
  • Joseph Hill and the Nazarite vow

    David Warner Mathisen
    22 Jan 2015 | 7:01 am
    Culture: "Why am I a Rastaman?" from Humble African (2000).January 22 is the birthday of Joseph Hill of Culture, born this day in 1949.Some of his countless inspiring songs are mentioned in this previous post from 2012.Regarding the "big picture" of human experience, the ancient scriptures of the world depict our incarnation in this material world as a case of spirit being "crossed with" matter -- and explain that a major aspect of our mission in this life is to raise up the spirit (in ourselves, in others, and indeed in all of nature) that has been cast down and hidden by matter -- to…
  • The Samson Myth is all about YOU

    David Warner Mathisen
    22 Jan 2015 | 6:59 am
    I have uploaded a new video diving into the profound message for each of us, hidden within the riddle of the Samson story.Please share it with anyone whom you feel would be interested!Blessings -- Namaste.
  • Samson and the seven locks of his head

    David Warner Mathisen
    16 Jan 2015 | 11:54 pm
    image: Wikimedia commons (link).In the Book of Judges, we are told twice that Samson has "seven locks" of hair. In Chapter 16, beginning in verse 13, we read:13 And Delilah said unto Samson, Hitherto thou hast mocked me, and told me lies: tell me wherewith thou mightest be bound. And he said unto her, If thou weavest the seven locks of my head with the web.14 And she fastened it with the pin, and said unto him, The Philistines be upon thee, Samson. And he awakened out of his sleep, and went away with the pin of the beam, and with the web.15 And she said unto him, How canst thou say, I love…
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    Cultural Heritage Lawyer Rick St. Hilaire

  • Be a Judge: The 2015 National Cultural Heritage Law Moot Court Competition Needs You!

    26 Jan 2015 | 6:00 pm
    DePaul University College of Law and the Lawyers’ Committee for Cultural Heritage Preservation are seeking attorneys to serve as judges during the Sixth Annual National Cultural Heritage Law Moot Court Competition. This year’s Competition is the largest and most competitive yet, with twenty-six teams representing nineteen law schools from across the country participating in the 2015 Competition! Oral arguments will be held on February 27-28, 2015 at the Everett McKinley Dirksen United States Courthouse, home of the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals, in Chicago, IL.The 2015 Competition…
  • Opposition to MoU's: A Change in Policy for the Association of Art Museum Directors?

    22 Jan 2015 | 8:38 pm
    Museums are vital to the protection of cultural heritage. They preserve art and artifacts for the benefit of present and future generations, and they inspire visitors, students, and scholars to appreciate and safeguard history.Most museums are tax exempt charitable corporations, holding the public's trust as stewards of human civilization. They are expected to lawfully and ethically acquire artifacts. They also are counted on to promote policies that preserve cultural objects.So it is with interest that the Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD) last Tuesday opposed the renewal of a…
  • U.N. Report: Destruction of Heritage Flagged as Risk Factor Related to Atrocity Crimes

    15 Jan 2015 | 5:30 am
    The destruction of objects of cultural or religious heritage is a signature feature of  genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. That is the assessment offered by a recent United Nations report examining, what are collectively called, atrocity crimes.Published by The Office of the Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, Framework of Analysis for Atrocity Crimes: A Tool for Prevention describes risk factors associated with grave criminal conduct directed toward specific groups, civilians, and legally protected populations.Several threats to cultural and…
  • Back Again: A Bill Weakening the NHPA Has Been Proposed in the House

    12 Jan 2015 | 5:30 am
    A bill that would weaken the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) is back on Capitol Hill.Last week, California congressman Darrell Issa (R-CA-49) introduced H.R. 135, the latest incarnation of an earlier legislative proposal that would empower a single federal agency head to unilaterally prevent a property from placement on the National Historic Register or from designation as a National Historic Landmark.The bill seeks to amend  the NHPA so that the head of the agency managing federal property can deny--based on unspecified national security grounds--historically…
  • Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Program for Museum Exhibitions: New Budget Law Sets Higher Limits

    18 Dec 2014 | 9:43 pm
    The Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Program received a significant boost from lawmakers on Capitol Hill this week, and museums are sure to take note.Tucked within the 1600 pages of the $1.1 trillion budget bill signed into law on Tuesday is a section that raises the indemnity limits for America's largest art insurance program.Administered by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Program protects temporary museum exhibitions against loss or damage and saves nonprofit cultural institutions $30 million dollars a year in costs they otherwise would have spent on…
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    The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty

  • Episode 21 “The Archaeology of Alcohol: Ancient Ales Edition”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    19 Jan 2015 | 3:57 pm
     Subscribe to my feed! Welcome to Episode 21 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty “The Archaeology of Alcohol: Ancient Ales Edition!” I suggest you sit back, pop open a cold one, get a little toasty, and enjoy this generally informative fun-times podcast. So, our ancestors have been making alcoholic concoctions for thousands of years, and thanks to science and archaeology we now have the ability to reconstruct the recipes to some of these awesome drinks. I thought it would be interesting to find out about how alcohol has evolved from its early days to…
  • Episode 20 “What’s Next?”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    2 Dec 2014 | 4:40 am
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back! It’s Episode 20 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty, “What’s Next?” So, I thought I’d catch you up on recent events relating to grad school and my career(Spoiler: I’m graduating, yay me!). That turned into the perfect opportunity for me to dispense some sagely advice about going out into the job market and figuring out what to do after school. If you’re looking for some great sources to look for jobs or learn about how to get jobs, I suggest you check out some of the sources I listed in…
  • Episode 19 “Caen you handle this? It’s France, part Deux!”

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    2 Oct 2014 | 11:50 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Welcome back to The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty! This is episode 19 of the podcast “Caen you handle this? It’s France, part Deux!” In this, the second installment of Jenny’s French adventures, we talk about my time in Paris and the Normandy region. Some of the things I waxed on about in this episode include: What’s up with city planning and historical relevance in Paris? Saint Denis Paris? Really? His name is Denis… Jenny’s movie recommendation for the month: Midnight in Paris Guess the obscure musical…
  • Béarnaise Awesome-Sauce

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:17 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Bonjour mes amis! Et bienvenue to episode 18 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty, “Béarnaise Awesome-Sauce!” You may have noticed that I’ve been gone for the last three weeks (yeah, sorry about that), well it’s because I’ve been in France! So I thought now that I’ve returned to my native soil I would tell you all about my travels and the fun and fascinating things I learned while exploring the beautiful land of baguettes, burgundy, and béarnaise sauce! This will be a two-part series because there’s…
  • Episode 17 “Great Odin’s Raven- it’s Archaeology 101!

    guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com (Jenny McNiven )
    5 Jul 2014 | 5:48 pm
    Subscribe to my feed! Hi friends, welcome to Episode 17 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty Podcast “Great Odin’s Raven-it’s Archaeology 101!” In this fun filled episode we tackle some of the basics of excavation, with a focus on why archaeology and geology are old friends- and how this makes us better at what we do. It’s like taking that Archaeology 101 class you never got around to in college! (Unless you actually did take that class, then it’s more of a review of things you probably already know…sorry). In this new…
 
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    AntiquityNOW

  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! Mix It Up With a Mead Cocktail for the Super Bowl

    AntiquityNOW
    28 Jan 2015 | 2:00 am
    The Seahawks and Patriots are playing in the National Football League’s Super Bowl XLIX in the United States this Sunday. There’s lots of planning to do before you throw the Super Bowl party of the century. You’re probably stocking up … Continue reading →
  • Did You Hear the News About AntiquityNOW?

    AntiquityNOW
    27 Jan 2015 | 6:28 am
    In today’s busy society, with so many outlets vying for our attention, it can be difficult to catch every blog post, read every social media update and discover every new and useful resource. We know you’re probably juggling many things … Continue reading →
  • Bon Appetit Wednesday! Ancient Magical Kefir

    AntiquityNOW
    21 Jan 2015 | 2:00 am
    We’ve written before about the benefits of looking to our past for nutritious foods. Many ancient cultures thrived in part because of the healthy, natural staples in their diets such as amaranth and quinoa in Mesoamerica, the adzuki bean in … Continue reading →
  • Final Call for Entries for LegacyQuest 2015

    AntiquityNOW
    20 Jan 2015 | 2:00 am
    It’s not too late to bring history to life! Submit your video showing how the past has resonance today. Join in our international film festival for tweens! Final videos due February 27, 2015 Visit http://antiquitynow.org/antiquitynow-month/legacy-quest-festival/ for submission details (individuals ages … Continue reading →
  • In Honor of Martin Luther King Jr.

    AntiquityNOW
    19 Jan 2015 | 2:00 am
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    Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica

  • Audio News for January 18 to 24, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    26 Jan 2015 | 7:02 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: X-ray analysis of fragile Herculaneum scrolls yielding clues to an ancient library (details) Italian police report "the largest discovery yet" of looted antiquities (details) New DNA analysis of Kennewick Man suggests a Native American ancestry (details) Advanced imaging reveals previously unknown tattoos on the 5300-year old Ötzi (details)
  • Audio News for January 11 to 17, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    19 Jan 2015 | 4:48 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Bronze figurine on Danish island shows famous friend of Bacchus (details) Burial mound in Japan may be early grave of Emperor Jomei (details) Early Egyptian frontier fortress excavated in Sinai (details) Pyrite mirrors show Hohokam links to ancient Mesoamerica (details)
  • Audio News for January 4 to January 10, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    12 Jan 2015 | 10:57 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Horse and chariot burials show power of early Chinese states (details) New tomb in Egypt held Fifth Dynasty queen (details) Byzantine palindrome amulet shows slow fade of ancient paganism (details) Colorado forests document surviving wickiups (details)
  • Audio News for December 28, 2014, to January 3, 2015

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    1 Jan 2015 | 7:18 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Geological study of Belize’s Blue Hole lagoon points to a major Maya drought (details) 4,000-year old copper crown pushes the boundaries of the Indus Valley culture (details) Pioneering Vikings first traveled to the British Isles from the central Norway coast (details) New analysis in Florida suggests the Vero site may predate Clovis (details)
  • Audio News for December 21 to 27, 2014

    Archaeological Legacy Institute
    29 Dec 2014 | 5:57 am
    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Remains of Roman-era synagogue found in rural Israel (details) Million-year-old stone tool in Turkey pushes back age of human spread into Europe (details) Earthquake effects may have led to abandonment of ancient kingdom in China (details) Dating discrepancies provide insight into early Neolithic adaptations in Poland (details)
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    NOSAS Archaeology Blog

  • A Cross Stone found in Rosemarkie

    nosas
    18 Jan 2015 | 7:06 am
    by Tim Blackie (NOSAS) Rosemarkie Cross Stone (Tim Blackie) This intriguing carved, reworked and relatively portable piece of sandstone (0.32 x 0.38 x 0.15m) was originally located in a rockery in the garden of 1 High Street, Rosemarkie. Neither the owners of the house nor the local community have any knowledge of its provenance. The find location at 1 High Street is at the south west top of the High Street close to Rosemarkie Church and ancient graveyard where many Pictish and medieval stones have been discovered. The owners were selling their house and offered it to me as I was…
  • Sun-watch at Garbeg: A Conjecture

    nosas
    12 Jan 2015 | 1:54 pm
    A look at how a prehistoric agricultural community in the Scottish Highlands could have made sophisticated use of the sun.    by David Robinson (NOSAS) On a remote expanse of high ground, roughly 2 kilometres north of Drumnadrochit in the Highlands of Scotland, sits the extensive series of prehistoric archaeological features known as Garbeg. The records of the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historic Monuments contain detailed references to these features (see appendix), which include hut circles and field system, hut circle groups and a Pictish Barrow cemetery. There are also other…
  • Another Old Route through Ross-shire – Achanalt Station to Dalnachroich in Strathconon via Badinluchie

    nosas
    31 Dec 2014 | 9:33 am
    by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS) What is believed to be an old droving route from Badinluchie, south of Loch Achanalt in Strath Bran, to Dalnachroich in Strathconon was followed by several NOSAS members on a sunny day in October. Climbing up from Badinluchie The Roy map of c1750 has two roads from the east coast to the west through Ross-shire, one through Strathconon and one through Strath Bran. At this time they would hardly have been roads but more probably bridle ways easily traversed by ponies; a road from Contin to Poolewe through Strath Bran first appears in the records about the year 1760.
  • Highland Henge Trail

    nosas
    17 Nov 2014 | 1:06 pm
    by Roland Spencer-Jones (NOSAS) Henges in Highland seem to be a bit different from other UK henges. Smaller, later, less flamboyant. More akin to the quiet steady Highland temperament, perhaps. A henge is usually defined as a circular enclosure, surrounded by a ditch, surrounded by a bank, with one or two entrances. They can be, but don’t need to be, associated with internal burials, or standing stones, or posts. They are generally a varied lot. Although the earliest known UK henge is at Stenness in Orkney, approx 3100BC at the start of the later Neolithic, the biggest and most spectacular…
  • Glenarigolach Abandoned Township, Wester Ross

    nosas
    15 Nov 2014 | 2:39 pm
    by Anne McInnes (NOSAS) Glenarigolach meaning ‘ glen of the forked shieling ‘ is accessed by a stalkers path leading up the hill on the E side of the Gruinard river. The area is centred on NG 98237 89963 and lies at a height of 100m. The glen was once well populated and Glenarigolach lies between the smaller settlements of Ridorcha and Craigour (See HER Record). Looking down the glen at Glenarigolach During the Highland Archaeology Festival 2014 NOSAS led a walk to the site on their second visit to the area. We were not quite so lucky with the weather as in April, but still enjoyed…
 
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